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Does 危機 really mean both crisis and opportunity? Yes or No. No, when Chinese saying this word with no second thought, we don't imply the meaning of opportunity. Yes, you still can "interpret" this word separately to mean both crisis and opportunity, to show a positive attitude, since 危 mean crisis and 機 can roughly mean opportunity.


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Drunken (programming) Master is right. These 2 from iciba: It sounds like a wonderful idea to me, does it really work? 听起来这个主意很不错,真的能行吗? His rhetoric sounds like the death rattle of a fading leadership. 他的慷慨陈词听起来像是一个衰落的领导层垂死的挣扎。 They also have examples of 听上去。It's a great site for finding example sentences.


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Basically you can use it whenever you want to say enjoy the meal. Most common use is by waiters. In Chinese dining, dishes are served in turn, not all in one go. So waiters say 请慢用 every time they bring a new dish to your table, no just right before you start. Same applies if you are cooking for your guest. It is also used when you need to leave the party ...


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I think it's all about when you say it. If you say it before the person starts to eat, it's just a polite way to say "enjoy your food". If you say it when he/she already started, it could sound like you are correcting the way he/she eats.


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You are all experts on chinese culcure. But allow me to add some comment. Another Chineses expression regarding 吃我豆腐 is 占我便宜,which also means taking advantage of me. But in the contemporary era, girls use 吃我豆腐 to expecially describe some one touched her boobs. Because they bear great similarities in both appearance and feel.


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慢 generally has positive connotations of being deliberate, such as 慢走, "walk slow", which is commonly said before someone departs.


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Usually you would say "bon appetit" at the beginning of the meal. Same applies in Chinese: you can say either 慢慢吃 / 请慢用 / 请 / 慢用 The only time it might cause confusion is when you say it during the middle of the meal


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It is a polite expression, not liable to cause offence, something like 'enjoy your meal'.


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I don't know if my answer is absolutely right. There is a famous book named Di-Zi-Gui (弟子规)from Confucianism(儒学). You know, Confucianism was prevailing for a long time in China. As I know, Di-Zi-Gui is a book to teach children moral precepts and standards. 《弟子规》:“勿践阈,勿跛倚,勿箕踞,勿摇髀……” The first one is 勿践阈 勿 means 'don't 不能',践 means ‘踩’,阈 means ‘门槛’ ...


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Wong, 廢柴 usually used to describe someone who is a "rubbish", a weak person. This word is very common in Hong Kong, it is not a foul language, but not polite



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