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As a native speaker, this is what I do in such a case: If my listener is not Chinese, does not know Chinese, or I am speaking in an event that doesn't require my listener(s) to know Chinese - I pronounce it in whatever tone I feel comfortable. Sometimes I mimic the listeners' pronunciation. (However, if I can guess the tones, I may tend to guess, because ...


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To a native speaker, even the phrase "he shenme nimen?" makes sense, but I would say the general structure to what you are trying to say is: Subj. + Verb + 什么(What) + Sometimes optional(Noun) ? Example 1: 你(You) + 喝(Drink) + 什么(What)? In this case, you don't need to follow by a noun, because "drink" is normally water/soft drink/alchol Example 2: 你(You) + ...


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Hanyu Pinyin is generally used for Standard Chinese. If you want to represent /uɛ/ in something consistent with Hanyu Pinyin, you could use uê. The Wikipedia article was using Sichuanese Pinyin, which may not be compatible with Hanyu Pinyin.


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Hearing English speaking folks pronounce Beijing as ”Beizhing” makes this an unrealistic ambition (is it really that hard pronouncing jing quite naturally as in jingle bells?). You simply can't expect people to correctly pronounce names or stuff in another language. Certainly, in some European countries, there are ambitions to come as close as possible: ...



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