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11

The correct one should be bu2 zai4 hu. Unless there is an emphasis for "NOT" CARE, a 4th tone bu4 is then used, but I rarely hear that as a native speaker. Let's review the tone change rule for 不, A second tone bu2 is used only when the tone of next character is a 4th tone, i.e. bu2 shi4. A forth tone bu4 is used if the tone of next character is 1st, 2nd ...


11

Dictionaries, in general, will not incorporate tone sandhi rules into their pronunciations (of which Mandarin has quite a few) Wikipedia says the following: Mandarin Chinese Mandarin features several sandhi tone rules. When there are two 3rd tones in a row, the first one becomes 2nd tone, and the second one becomes a half-3rd tone. E.g. 你好 ...


8

It seems that Pinyin does this to conform to a former phonetic transcription system 注音符号, which drops u (ㄨ) before o (ㄛ) after b p m f. 注音符号 was originally designed to reflect some old (perhaps not even real) phonetic rules and symbols like uo (ㄨㄛ) uan (ㄨㄢ) were used. However, in most Chinese dialects there's no contrast between rounded and unrounded vowels ...


7

All the consonants in the first group are bilabials (articulated with the two lips). The reason can't be phonemic, since there are no such Pinyin syllables *do, *so, *lo etc. -- as you correctly note Pinyin could be simplified by replacing all -uo syllables with -o. I expect the reason for the spelling is perceptual -- from the perspective of phonetics, ...


6

Chinese was once monosyllabic, where one character represented one word. But back then, thousands of years ago, pronunciation for characters was also much more distinct, and still is in certain topolects (like Cantonese). Modern Mandarin, on the other hand, compensates for lack of precision in pronunciation by being polysyllabic, where mosts words are ...


5

I think it is a terrible mistake that the website has made, because there is no occasion when qu is pronounced tsʰu in Mandarin. Since you can actually tell the difference between u and ü, things should be easier for you now. You can just memorise that after (pinyin) j, q, x, y, ü is always written as u, and if you see u after j, q, x, y, it's always ...


5

In standard Mandarin, the pinyin h is pronounced as [x] in IPA, like ch in Scottish English loch -- yes, you're right that there's a tiny g, because [x] is a velar consonant. However, in south China, many simply say [h], although some natural assimilation may happen. For instance, for those speakers, pinyin ha is [ha] while pinyin he becomes [xɤ] (if you get ...


5

It's Mandarin transliteration by Portuguese Jesuit Fr. Inácio da Costa (17th century). Partial text: “大学之道,在明明德,在亲民,在止于至善” Ta hio chi dao, cai min min te, cai cin min, cai chi yu chi xen


4

Regarding starting with pinyin or characters: It's funny, I recently asked this question myself. In your case, I would recommend: Starting with basics of pinyin... getting the hang of pronunciation. TalkBank provides a pinyin chart that pronounces each for you given the selected tone. It's really cool. Just choose a tone, and click on a vowel/initial. ...


4

There is no radical, but the left part of 那 can be 冄 rǎn (the same as 冉) U+5184 Seal Script That's because in the seal script, 那 is written as The left part is 冄, and the right part (radical) is 邑. So in 說文解字, it is described as 从邑,冄聲。 But it is better not to call 冄 a "radical", because modern dictionaries and ...


4

Sure. We don't have pinyin(the one used today) until the foundation of PRC. The creator of Pinyin is this man, zhoyouguang (wiki) In my point of view, pinyin has little to do with English. So don't mess them up. Pinyin has its own pronunciation, its own combination rules. The practice of Pinyin is to, reduce the illiteracy of Chinese people, to better ...


4

what you asked is called compound finals, see here And your case (o -> uo) is just one of the several cases, for example, a -> ia, e -> ie, o -> uo, a -> ua. It has a slight difference in pronunciation, with compound finals, it sounds more smooth.


4

I found listening to music really helped when learning - artists from Taiwan and the south tend to sing more clearly in my opinion. perhaps you could start there. Also, it is worth noting that in English we have around 8000 unique syllables, whereas in (mandarin) Chinese there are only around 400 (multiply this by 4 for the tones).


3

When I was first learning Chinese, we were using the New Practical Chinese Reader series of books. In them: Dialogues and vocabulary are presented with both characters and pinyin. You were only expected to memorize a subset of the characters used in a given chapter (e.g., in the first dialogue, you only had to learn how to write 你, 好, and 吗 or something ...


3

I've looked for a similar font (with pinyin on top, or bottom) and have not found anything. There are a lot of naysayers on this thread, and I'm not sure why. Such a font would be extremely useful, even given the limitations. Creation of such a font would be automatic using publicly available databases, and even if the original fonts were copyrighted, one ...


3

The other answers seem to have mistaken what you are looking for... Wikipedia has a page of 同音文章 (one-syllable articles or homophonic poems (as you called it)): here (in case they get deleted here's what they have below) 侄治痔   《侄治痔》   芝之稚侄郅,至智,知制纸,知织帜。   芝痔,炙痔,痔殖,郅至芝址,知之,知芷汁治痔,至芷址执芷枝,豸至,踯,郅执直枝掷之,枝至豸趾,豸止。   郅执芷枝致芝,芝执芷治痔,痔止。   ...


3

(This answer strictly speaks to the question. There is also some good, related information in the other answers you may find interesting.) Na4zi4pang2 is Pinyin for 那字旁, literally 'the radical from 那'. It's the name of the radical instead of pronunciation for a character. I am not an expert in character classification and (de)composition, I don't know in ...


3

太阳 Tàiyáng, Sun: pronounced "Tie Yang" 太 Tài:highest; greatest 阳 yáng:sun You may find some reference yáng as 5th tone (轻声 qīngshēng) because it's easier to pronounce in spoken Chinese. The character 阳 yáng by itself is always 2nd tone.


3

zhon would cover this I believe Example: pinyin_a_re.findall('Yǒurén diūshīle yī bǎ fǔzi, zěnme zhǎo yě méiyǒu zhǎodào.') ['Yǒu', 'rén', ' ', 'diū', 'shī', 'le', ' ', 'yī', ' ', 'bǎ', ' ', 'fǔ', 'zi', ',', ' ', 'zěn', 'me', ' ', 'zhǎo', ' ', 'yě', ' ', 'méi', 'yǒu', ' ', 'zhǎo', 'dào', '.']


3

Phonetic Substitution Although the character cannot currently be typed into a computer, wikipedia notes that one may use a phonetic substitution. I doubt that most people would recognise this 58 stroke original character in any case but at least this may be a usable substitute. The Chinese character for "biáng" cannot be entered into computers. ...


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

Don't connect Chinese sounds to English sounds (or any other language, for that matter). It will only hinder your pronunciation. For example: A lot of learners want to connect 'xi' with the English 'she' - but first the Chinese 'x' is represented by the IPA letter ɕ where as the English 'sh' is represented by IPA ʃ - although it might be considered a ...


3

I think I know one. 扥 dèn This means "pull with a little brutal force".


2

I had a similar experience learning Chinese (My first teacher was from Taiwan, so we learned Zhu Yin). I found that the best way to learn pinyin was through chat room practice. Live conversations gave both contextual and applicable meaning to the pinyin I was using, and therefore helped solidify my understanding of pinyin. I recommend going to ...


2

There is an (almost) one-to-one mapping from Zhuyin to Pinyin, replacing symbols with letters. In my humble opinion, Pinyin only save one from remembering symbols. Neither Pinyin nor Zhuyin is perfect. Better learn both of them. Pinyin is the result of an attempt of romanization, everything is going well except that, after all, Chinese language is quite ...


2

as Stumpy Joe Pete said, you'll be hard pressed to find a font that works in all cases, and that you may want to look into a browser extension that highlights, magnifies, and explains the character you've hovered over. I recommend Pera Pera Kun: http://www.perapera.org/ They have extensions for FireFox and Chrome. Here's a snapshot: I have never seen ...


2

For Android, there is Pinyiner (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.astratech.chinesereader_free) . It works offline, you can even read books, mark new words and create flashcards.


2

In the past (e.g. 80's to 90's), when the Chinese IME did not implement fuzzy logic, the rule was you should use v for and only for ü as you would write on paper. For example for J you should type ju not jv. Now all the mainstream Chinese IME (MSPY, Sogou, Google Pinyin, etc.) has fuzzy logic built-in and enabled by default. This question isn't much ...


2

Names are still tricky. There was even a heated discussion recently about the correct pronunciation of a very famous person called 甄嬛. Some characters are neither wrong nor right, e.g.: 茜 some people pronounce it xi1 other pronounce it qian4 ... it just depends on their parents Haven't tired any of these but there's a bunch of different software that will ...


2

The problem is than pinyin x also sounds "like" an English sh. I'm pre-embryonic at Chinese but I've been an armchair linguist for years and I'm in China trying to pick up Mandarin right now. Both Pinyin sh and x are different from English sh. In English sh your tongue is at the ridge just behind your upper teeth. In Pinyin sh your tongue bends backwards ...



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