Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

All the consonants in the first group are bilabials (articulated with the two lips). The reason can't be phonemic, since there are no such Pinyin syllables *do, *so, *lo etc. -- as you correctly note Pinyin could be simplified by replacing all -uo syllables with -o. I expect the reason for the spelling is perceptual -- from the perspective of phonetics, ...


7

It seems that Pinyin does this to conform to a former phonetic transcription system 注音符号, which drops u (ㄨ) before o (ㄛ) after b p m f. 注音符号 was originally designed to reflect some old (perhaps not even real) phonetic rules and symbols like uo (ㄨㄛ) uan (ㄨㄢ) were used. However, in most Chinese dialects there's no contrast between rounded and unrounded vowels ...


6

The OP is asking how to type characters, using a pinyin IME, when those characters have a ü in their pinyin spelling. For example, how do you type 绿=lü? This is different than asking how to actually type the letter ü. The answer is to type a v. To follow the example, change to the pinyin IME, type lv and select 绿.


4

what you asked is called compound finals, see here And your case (o -> uo) is just one of the several cases, for example, a -> ia, e -> ie, o -> uo, a -> ua. It has a slight difference in pronunciation, with compound finals, it sounds more smooth.


4

There is no radical, but the left part of 那 can be 冄 rǎn (the same as 冉) U+5184 Seal Script That's because in the seal script, 那 is written as The left part is 冄, and the right part (radical) is 邑. So in 說文解字, it is described as 从邑,冄聲。 But it is better not to call 冄 a "radical", because modern dictionaries and ...


4

I think it is a terrible mistake that the website has made, because there is no occasion when qu is pronounced tsʰu in Mandarin. Since you can actually tell the difference between u and ü, things should be easier for you now. You can just memorise that after (pinyin) j, q, x, y, ü is always written as u, and if you see u after j, q, x, y, it's always ...


4

Regarding starting with pinyin or characters: It's funny, I recently asked this question myself. In your case, I would recommend: Starting with basics of pinyin... getting the hang of pronunciation. TalkBank provides a pinyin chart that pronounces each for you given the selected tone. It's really cool. Just choose a tone, and click on a vowel/initial. ...


4

Sure. We don't have pinyin(the one used today) until the foundation of PRC. The creator of Pinyin is this man, zhoyouguang (wiki) In my point of view, pinyin has little to do with English. So don't mess them up. Pinyin has its own pronunciation, its own combination rules. The practice of Pinyin is to, reduce the illiteracy of Chinese people, to better ...


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

(This answer strictly speaks to the question. There is also some good, related information in the other answers you may find interesting.) Na4zi4pang2 is Pinyin for 那字旁, literally 'the radical from 那'. It's the name of the radical instead of pronunciation for a character. I am not an expert in character classification and (de)composition, I don't know in ...


3

zhon would cover this I believe Example: pinyin_a_re.findall('Yǒurén diūshīle yī bǎ fǔzi, zěnme zhǎo yě méiyǒu zhǎodào.') ['Yǒu', 'rén', ' ', 'diū', 'shī', 'le', ' ', 'yī', ' ', 'bǎ', ' ', 'fǔ', 'zi', ',', ' ', 'zěn', 'me', ' ', 'zhǎo', ' ', 'yě', ' ', 'méi', 'yǒu', ' ', 'zhǎo', 'dào', '.']


3

When I was first learning Chinese, we were using the New Practical Chinese Reader series of books. In them: Dialogues and vocabulary are presented with both characters and pinyin. You were only expected to memorize a subset of the characters used in a given chapter (e.g., in the first dialogue, you only had to learn how to write 你, 好, and 吗 or something ...


2

as Stumpy Joe Pete said, you'll be hard pressed to find a font that works in all cases, and that you may want to look into a browser extension that highlights, magnifies, and explains the character you've hovered over. I recommend Pera Pera Kun: http://www.perapera.org/ They have extensions for FireFox and Chrome. Here's a snapshot: I have never seen ...


2

I had a similar experience learning Chinese (My first teacher was from Taiwan, so we learned Zhu Yin). I found that the best way to learn pinyin was through chat room practice. Live conversations gave both contextual and applicable meaning to the pinyin I was using, and therefore helped solidify my understanding of pinyin. I recommend going to ...


2

There is an (almost) one-to-one mapping from Zhuyin to Pinyin, replacing symbols with letters. In my humble opinion, Pinyin only save one from remembering symbols. Neither Pinyin nor Zhuyin is perfect. Better learn both of them. Pinyin is the result of an attempt of romanization, everything is going well except that, after all, Chinese language is quite ...


2

The problem is than pinyin x also sounds "like" an English sh. I'm pre-embryonic at Chinese but I've been an armchair linguist for years and I'm in China trying to pick up Mandarin right now. Both Pinyin sh and x are different from English sh. In English sh your tongue is at the ridge just behind your upper teeth. In Pinyin sh your tongue bends backwards ...


2

Here's one way to do it which I figured out starting from some tips thanks to user2619 in the comments: Right click on the keyboard/IME icon in the system tray. Select "Settings" from the popup menu. The "Text Services and Input Languages" dialog will appear. Use the "General" tab. Under "Installed services" click on "Add...". Find the section "Chinese ...


1

I also struggle with all of these kinds of strange inconsistencies in Pinyin. Your Chinese friends have trouble explaining it because they learned speaking before they learned Pinyin and Pinyin seems to have been designed to make sense that way at the cost of confusing adult second language learners. With many languages such as English the writing is based ...


1

Sorry pal, I don't think such software exist for a simple reason of exponential combination process. Chinese pronunciation has so many rules. Add on top of that, there are "occasional" special cases which may be frequent in usage. I gave it a minutes and I couldn't see how such a software could be designed to translate Chinese text to sound symbol. The ...


1

To PinYin Please use: Chinese version of word or WPS, in word you can see: 用鼠标选中需要注音的文字(拖黑)——格式——中文版式——拼音(Word2003,XP……) for Word2007 or above version, switch to "Home" page and then click this:


1

吗 is a simplified Chinese character. You can tell from the short horizontal line where traditional would have four dots or legs. 嗎 is the traditional Chinese character equivalent. So if you really need 吗 you should install Simplified instead of or as well as Traditional Chinese. Traditional is used in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao, but most people in ...


1

I have never looked for this kind of a tool before - good idea! I just ran a search using and came across an online tool that will do what you ask: http://zhongwenzhuanpinyin.51240.com/ If you can read a little bit of Chinese, I would recommend trying this one. It will convert your Chinese characters to pinyin and show tones. I have read on many Chinese ...


1

I've looked for a similar font (with pinyin on top, or bottom) and have not found anything. There are a lot of naysayers on this thread, and I'm not sure why. Such a font would be extremely useful, even given the limitations. Creation of such a font would be automatic using publicly available databases, and even if the original fonts were copyrighted, one ...


1

Speaking solely from my experience as a native, I think both pronunciation (tai4 yang2 and tai4 yang5) are OK. tai4 yang5 may be heard more because of the ease to pronounce. For respected sources, I'd still recommend 现代汉语词典. There is also a site called 汉典(http://www.zdic.net/) which I often refer to, but it sometimes has minor errors (as can be found in its ...


1

Heres a few excerpts from some books that speak about this: Ross and Ma (2006), Modern Mandarin Chinese Grammar, §2.4, p.9: In Beijing and northern China, certain syllables lose their original tone and are pronounced as neutral tone. This tone change does not occur in Taiwan, where all syllables retain their original tones. San Duanmu (2007), The Phonology ...


1

'U' is pronounced 'Ü' with the initials J, Q, X and the pseudo-initial 'Y'. Otherwise it is always pronounced 'U'. Something that might help one remember it, is that J, Q and X are also pronounced with the same tongue-position but with slightly varying flow of air. So J, Q and X are basically one pronunciation. I like to think that the inventors of pinyin ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible