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6

I had a student in Taiwan who was blind, so I've had a chance to work with this. There are articles on Chinese Braille in both the English and Chinese Wikipedias if you haven't read them yet. It is a spelling (phonetic) method, not character based. Blind Chinese students are not taught regular character forms. Braille in Taiwan is basically zhuyinfuhao; ...


5

I suggest that you shouldn't do this. Chinese characters cannot be faithfully constructed backwards from a tone+syllable combination -- the mapping only goes one way (and even then, sometimes characters have multiple pronunciations). For example, as you know, 馬 is generally pronounced ma3. However, ma3 could also reference the characters 碼 (number), or 獁 ...


4

I use Sogou input, there's a preference setting for it. And I believe many Chinese input have it too.


4

In general, I think too much importance is ascribed to which transcription system is used. Students' ability to distinguish, pronounce and remember tones depends on many factors and the way the tones are written are just a very small part of it. Even if there was a difference between systems, it would probably drown in other factors. The question of tonal ...


2

You can install ibus and ibus-pinyin (there's also google pinyin but I personally prefer ibus-pinyin) or scim. Scim is more the historical software, but ibus is definitely better. You will probably have to restart (!), but then there's about no configuration: at most, you learn the shortcuts to switch between input methods.


2

I would recommend Google Pinyin which I use everyday: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.inputmethod.pinyin


2

You kind of hit a snag without knowing Chinese characters (hanzi), because there are so many homophones in chinese, especially without tones. In your example of 吗 and 马, they both have different tones which you don't type at all, and actually typing ma for me gives about 15 different characters to choose from. In fact, even words like 终止 and 中止 sound ...


2

Chao was a genius and a very funny guy. But pinyin draws on his experience with GR and a lot of other efforts. Pinyin is a better system. And of course it is far more widely used. Tone marks seem weird to a lot of English speakers -- though of course they are standard in French too -- and used to be a big nuisance to type, on typewriters. But today they ...


2

As a native speaker, this is what I do in such a case: If my listener is not Chinese, does not know Chinese, or I am speaking in an event that doesn't require my listener(s) to know Chinese - I pronounce it in whatever tone I feel comfortable. Sometimes I mimic the listeners' pronunciation. (However, if I can guess the tones, I may tend to guess, because ...


2

Solution for Windows 8.1 Go to Control Panel\Clock, Language, and Region\Language (Alternatively, click the downward arrow on the language bar (on the taskbar) to open the menu and click Settings...) Click Add a language Select Chinese (Simplified) Select Chinese (Simplified, China) Once 中文(中华人民共和国) is available as a language, click Options following it. ...


2

OK, again in mac os x, go to system preferences⋯keyboard⋯input sources⋯press +⋯choose "chinese-traditional" from the left⋯then choose "pinyin - traditional", voila :) remember to check the "show input menu in menu bar", then you can choose the pinyin as input method, and type "out" traditional chinese characters. have fun :)


2

To a native speaker, even the phrase "he shenme nimen?" makes sense, but I would say the general structure to what you are trying to say is: Subj. + Verb + 什么(What) + Sometimes optional(Noun) ? Example 1: 你(You) + 喝(Drink) + 什么(What)? In this case, you don't need to follow by a noun, because "drink" is normally water/soft drink/alchol Example 2: 你(You) + ...


1

As pinyin doesn't use the letter v, then words containing the u with umlaut can be written with v key, then combined with the number keys to get different tones. For example: v+1 = ǖ v+2 = ǘ v+3 = ǚ v+4 = ǜ v+5 = ü


1

Google Pinyin is another option for you. In Windows, switch your input method to Google Pinyin, and then use Ctrl+Shift+T to switch to traditional Chinese mode. Now you can type pinyin to get traditional Chinese characters. You can easily switch back-and-forth between simplified and traditional characters by using the same keyboard combination above.


1

This is why you have to learn the actual characters first, and read and write in the actual characters. Pinyin helps indicate the pronunciation, nothing more. There is no tool that can help you distinguish between hundreds of characters equally represented by one string of Roman letters.


1

Hanyu Pinyin is generally used for Standard Chinese. If you want to represent /uɛ/ in something consistent with Hanyu Pinyin, you could use uê. The Wikipedia article was using Sichuanese Pinyin, which may not be compatible with Hanyu Pinyin.


1

Hearing English speaking folks pronounce Beijing as ”Beizhing” makes this an unrealistic ambition (is it really that hard pronouncing jing quite naturally as in jingle bells?). You simply can't expect people to correctly pronounce names or stuff in another language. Certainly, in some European countries, there are ambitions to come as close as possible: ...


1

“華師大” I am using the simplified Chinese IME from Office 2010. This IME is mainly for simplified characters, but traditional Chinese characters also appear in its database. For an occasional use of traditional characters, you may have to scroll down several pages to choose a corresponding traditional character. For an occasional use of traditional ...


1

I know it's late to the game. This does not answer the question, in fact, it circumvents it. I recommend sogou pinyin (搜狗拼音). There are both versions for Windows and Mac. By default it's set to the simplified Chinese, but you can switch to the traditional version very easily by pressing "shift+ctrl+f", f for 繁体(fan ti). And press them again to switch ...


1

On the Pinyin language bar, click on Tool Menu > Options > Advanced Tab > Character Set to Traditional


1

"I’ve never met a pinyin learner with tones even half as accurate as a decent GR user." My only guess is that Tim Ferris has not met many Mandarin learners, then. Ask any foreigner with a near native leevel, one of those you see on TV or whatever, which system they learnt: chances are the vast majority will have studied pinyin. Not to say that GR is bad. ...


1

To what I have been taught in schools or even chinese dictionaries I flipped...the only correct pronunciation for the word blood is Xiě.....while Xuè is represent Snow. Hence it is depending on the individual on their level of acceptance and understanding of the language and/or words. For myself, I will only stick to my foundation laid...that is blood is ...


1

The explanation of below pic can help. "It's similar to the [ʒ] sound in the middle of English word "measure".


1

Many of the keyboards available have loads of bloatware, ads and require an incredible amount of permissions on your phone. They sometimes come in installed sizes of nearly 100 Megabytes. This is why I suggest another option: Multiling O Keyboard. It needs next to zero permissions has swiping is free of cost and free of ads (albeit not open source) ...


1

As mentioned by vermillion, various IME's include this functionality. But there are other ways of doing this. One way could be with a script similar to this one for windows Autohotkey_L. However, Autohotkey is not available for Gnu/Linux, so this would need to be reworked. A good text expansion app for Gnu/Linux is AutoKey. I made an example that can be ...



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