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As you already know it, there are five tones of Chinese character pronunciations, the level tone(阴平), the rising tone(阳平), the falling-rising tone(上声), the falling tone(去声), and the light tone(轻声). For the problem of "你好", it's the problem that it's hard to pronounce a sequence of multiple falling-rising tones continuously, if you are not pronouncing it ...


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It is a common convention writing pinyin with the dictionary tone. Students will soon learn the rules for tone sandhi, and will then apply it to both pinyin and characters. If applying tone sandhi in pinyin, there is a risk of associating a certain syllable with the wrong meaning or learning the wrong tone. So yes, nǐ hǎo is the standard rendering in pinyin,...


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If it makes up the same "expression" (usually ranging from one to four words) in pinyin, such as "budui', "nihao", etc, it is put together. If it is not the same "expression", they will be separated. For example: hen gaoxing renshi ni. Notice "hen" is separate from "gaoxing" and so forth. This helps the reader read with ease rather than having to make ...


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Navigate to /system/library/input methods Right click on TCIM.app and choose "show package contents" Navigate to contents/resources/ There you will have the icon, named pinyin.tiff. Make a backup of the icon. Make another icon, and replace this instance with your creation. Admin password needed. Kill TCIM to make it take effect. Keep a copy of your icon ...


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Update: I was not able to find out how to change the actual icon, but a quick fix was to select the "show input source name" in the dropdown on the top bar. I was just seeing the icon before, and now I can see the full name. This is fine but takes up 4x more space in my crowded top bar that it needs to. I'll consider it a shim.


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you can click on the icon, it should provide a drop-down menu with a bunch of preferences and options. Select "Show Input Source Name" - then select your preferred keyboard language. It should come up with the icon, PLUS something like "Pinyin - Simplified". This worked for me, hopefully works for you too!


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The regular use is exemplified below: 一次 24 yícì 一个 24 yígè 一旦 24 yídàn 一起 43 yìqǐ 一撇 43 yìpiě 一种 43 yìzhǒng 一人 42 yìrén 一行 42 yìxíng 一边 41 yìbiān 一堆 41 yìduī 一般 41 yìbān In addition, When 一 follows another character to form an immediate constituent, no matter how the tone changes, yi remains the first tone. 第一 41 dìyī ...


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Yìbiān would be correct. For ordinals, it is pronounced yī. In other cases, When followed by fourth tone, it takes the second tone (一对, yí duì). For all other following tones, it takes on the fourth tone. The reason it is not marked in dictionaries, is because the rules for tone sandhi are few and straightforward. Isolated cases are when a tone is dropped (...


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As pinyin doesn't use the letter v, then words containing the u with umlaut can be written with v key, then combined with the number keys to get different tones. For example: v+1 = ǖ v+2 = ǘ v+3 = ǚ v+4 = ǜ v+5 = ü



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