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Sentence structure does not change based on whether you use pinyin or characters. The basic sentence structure is subject-verb-object, with any attributes going before the corresponding sentence part: Kouke de nimen man-man de he dian shenme? The thirsty you slowly drink a bit of what? adjective-subject adverb-verb adjective-object There are ...


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To a native speaker, even the phrase "he shenme nimen?" makes sense, but I would say the general structure to what you are trying to say is: Subj. + Verb + 什么(What) + Sometimes optional(Noun) ? Example 1: 你(You) + 喝(Drink) + 什么(What)? In this case, you don't need to follow by a noun, because "drink" is normally water/soft drink/alchol Example 2: 你(You) + ...


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Hanyu Pinyin is generally used for Standard Chinese. If you want to represent /uɛ/ in something consistent with Hanyu Pinyin, you could use uê. The Wikipedia article was using Sichuanese Pinyin, which may not be compatible with Hanyu Pinyin.


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ue and üe are pronounced differently.ue is not used in Mandarin. Only üe is used. Edit: The questioner was actually asking about using Hanyu Pinyin to transcribe Sichuanese. Hanyu Pinyin was designed as a tool to teach the speaking of mandarin, but it is still possible to capture words in Sichuanese using the closest possible combinations. I see no ...


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As a native speaker, this is what I do in such a case: If my listener is not Chinese, does not know Chinese, or I am speaking in an event that doesn't require my listener(s) to know Chinese - I pronounce it in whatever tone I feel comfortable. Sometimes I mimic the listeners' pronunciation. (However, if I can guess the tones, I may tend to guess, because ...


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Hearing English speaking folks pronounce Beijing as ”Beizhing” makes this an unrealistic ambition (is it really that hard pronouncing jing quite naturally as in jingle bells?). You simply can't expect people to correctly pronounce names or stuff in another language. Certainly, in some European countries, there are ambitions to come as close as possible: ...


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I will address two parts to this question: how to read Chinese and how to learn how to understand spoken Chinese. Learning to recognise and pronounce all of the Chinese characters takes time and lots of practice. The best way is to use graded readers that introduce maybe 20-40 new characters per short story and then continuously repeat those characters in ...



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