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The other answers seem to have mistaken what you are looking for... Wikipedia has a page of 同音文章 (one-syllable articles or homophonic poems (as you called it)): here (in case they get deleted here's what they have below) 侄治痔   《侄治痔》   芝之稚侄郅,至智,知制纸,知织帜。   芝痔,炙痔,痔殖,郅至芝址,知之,知芷汁治痔,至芷址执芷枝,豸至,踯,郅执直枝掷之,枝至豸趾,豸止。   郅执芷枝致芝,芝执芷治痔,痔止。   ...


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It's the Tongue Twister with Chinese, you can look at this webpage,there are many interesting tongue twister examples.


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You can check out this website. Tongue Twister Examples and Origin there are example tongue twisters and the origins of tongue twister are explained (in Chinese). Tongue Twister in Chinese This is another website where examples of tongue twisters are shown only in Chinese. There is no Pinyin for this. I think this is more easier than the one above. The ...


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I think you'd better to know how computer distinguish words end user input. Here is a general idea, Computer could only know true and false, 1 and 0, and all the words would be 1 and 0 in the end. English words and Chinese words are the same for the computer basically. So we have to make computer know what does 'A' mean, and what does '我' mean. There are ...


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This question does not belong in Chinese language section, nevertheless. What you're talking are Chinese language input tools. There is actually nothing to solve here for game developers. Any game user can use Google pinyin, Sogou, Baidu input tools in a full screen application for Chinese input. A user types Chinese words in pinyin and gets a list of ...


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In oral Chinese, it is rarely to use only one character/syllable (almost all of the characters are also single-syllable words) to carry a specific meaning as a word. For example, the syllable "jiǎng" will be used with other character like "jiǎng + huà" (講話; speaking) or "dé + jiǎng" (得獎, receiving an award). In addition, not every meanings of a syllable ...


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Chinese was once monosyllabic, where one character represented one word. But back then, thousands of years ago, pronunciation for characters was also much more distinct, and still is in certain topolects (like Cantonese). Modern Mandarin, on the other hand, compensates for lack of precision in pronunciation by being polysyllabic, where mosts words are ...


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First, for the example you have given, besides 讲、奖 and 蒋 I don't think most people will think of any other characters than these when they hear the word jiǎng spoken by itself. A lot of the other characters you have listed there are either somewhat uncommon or are just a prefix/suffix for other words. It's somewhat like it someone just said the word ...


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丷 is a variant of 八, just as 灬 is a variant of 火. Variant characters are common for radicals, given that they can occur at difference positions within a composite character.


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I asked a friend in 2001, how best to learn Chinese and he pointed me to the Bopomofo phonetic alphabet, and the schools and textbooks that use it. That alphabet gave me very quickly an unambiguous tool for phonetic reading and writing so i didn't feel so entirely illiterate, it helped me learn pronunciation, helped me 'forget' my western phonetic patterns, ...


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For Android, there is Pinyiner (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.astratech.chinesereader_free) . It works offline, you can even read books, mark new words and create flashcards.


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v is not an Alphabet in official PINYIN system but an International Phonetic Alphabet. ǘ 读愚,于,雨,遇 But Sougou always using what is short for convenience. It's the most popular Chinese Input Method in China even Apple set it as default in OSX Mavericks. I think there are no strict rules,everything based on your own preferences.


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V is not used in Chinese as a consonant (声母), it was used to be ü as a vowel (Chinese called 韵母), like lv -> 绿 xv -> 许 Is there a standard rule here? Should ü always be replaced with v in pinyin programs? Yes What about after the J, Q, X and Y letters where ü is always implied, should I be hitting V or U on my keyboard? When used with JQXY ü is same as ...


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A more direct answer: lv nv lve nve


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In the past (e.g. 80's to 90's), when the Chinese IME did not implement fuzzy logic, the rule was you should use v for and only for ü as you would write on paper. For example for J you should type ju not jv. Now all the mainstream Chinese IME (MSPY, Sogou, Google Pinyin, etc.) has fuzzy logic built-in and enabled by default. This question isn't much ...



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