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15

Voicing and Aspiration Stop consonants can fall into the following categories (roughly): Voiced stops: Vocal chords start vibrating before stop is released. E.g., English "b" as in "bat" (/bæt/ in IPA), French "b" as in "bon" = /bɔ̃/. Unvoiced unaspirated stops: Vocal chords start vibrating almost exactly when stop is released. E.g., Chinese "b" as in ...


6

As a Mandarin native speaker I pronounce 道 exactly same as 到,稻。 I pronounce the initial d exactly same as in dog or dad. I also pronounce t exactly in the same way for stop. The native English pronunciation of dog and stop might be different, but to my ESL ears, they are exactly same. Added: Here is a video teaching Pinyin Mandarin Chinese Pinyin ...


2

说着 could be either a verb (said) or an adverb (while saying). But as I understand it these are pronounced differently. In most cases 说着 reads 'zhe' and means while saying. 说着(zhao2) is a rare usage only in colloquial language in the Northern dialects, where 着 means hit the target, e.g. '被你说着了' means 'spot on'. The non-dialectal version is '被你说中了'. ...


2

This is an interesting question, and it got me thinking for the last couple of days. Here's my two cents. Rather than try to match your pitches to some model recordings, have you tried matching them to your personal highs and lows when speaking English? Try to notice how high and low you can go in different language contexts. An example that comes to mind ...


1

I think it's true that Chinese speakers use a wider pitch range than English speakers, or at least a wider range than most American English speakers. I blame it on Clint Eastwood. Unfortunately it's pretty hard to change ingrained vocal habits. One way I've found to practice is to imagine some situation where the English intonation comes closer to ...


1

The difference would be the degree of correctness. Certain words must have no citation. Certain words must have. And certain words are in between. If you come to China, you will hear correct version and wrong version as well based on what province, what city you are. The reason is 1/ oral language is free style. 2/ dialect influence. Based on what you ...


1

I agree on the answer from Stumpy Joe Pete, and I want to add some points. In both Cantonese and Mandarin, there's no voiced consonants and only voiceless consonants. So 大埔 should indeed be Tai Po. In addition, in Wu Chinese, it has both voiced and voiceless consonants.



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