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4

Standard Cantonese's 陽平 tone is definitely pronounced with a falling contour (21). Modern Cantonese Phonology by Robert S. Bauer, p. 144 appears to acknowledge, but did not find, a low-level contour for this tone though: For the Mid-Low Falling tone both Yuan (1983:181) and Zhan (1985:168) also recognized a variant low level contour of ˩11 in addition to ...


4

An excellent resource for answering questions like this is 漢字古今音資料庫 at http://xiaoxue.iis.sinica.edu.tw/ccr/. Unfortunately it doesn't have Song or Yuan reconstructions, but it does list the 攝, which is a Song era classification. 祯 was in 梗攝, and 蒸 was in 曾攝 so they shouldn't have been complete homonyms. The difference, however, was probably in the vowel, ...


3

Originally, you had two separate characters (zdic links): 粘 = zhan1 = (v.) to stick 黏 = nian2 = (adj.) sticky The usage distinction still remains, but it is now acceptable to use 粘 for either word. Unihan lists the characters as semantic variants.


3

If you'd ever seen Mathews' Chinese-English dictionary (rev. American ed. Harvard UP, 1957 and a million pirate editions), this would ring a bell. "Chiai" goes back to the OLD National Pronunciation system of 1920 and can also be found in a system used by the missionaries of the China Inland Mission, of whom R. H. Mathews was one. The revision of Mathews ...


2

Woo6-yi5 户珥 From this pdf pg. 14 户珥 is pronounced Woo6-yi5 (Jyutping should be something like: Wu6-ji5).


2

From a native Chinese perspective: 粘(zhan) = 粘 (nian1) = to glue, to stick = verb. 粘(nian2) = 黏 (nian2) = sticky = adj. Although 黏 is more used in written, while 粘(nian2) is more oral.


2

I was taught at class, that zhan is the reading when 粘 is used as a verb, 'to stick, to glue'; the more common reading nian covers almost all the other cases, when its used as an adjective, 'sticky'. But I think this is not entirely correct. Here's a long list with compound words. In most cases the reading is nian, in some cases zhan. Try to see if you can ...


2

I don't agree wpt's answer. I'm a native speaker and most of people won't pronounce nèiyǒng unless you speak very very very fast(this phenomenon will happen on many many Chinese words). And for mandarin, it is considered as non-standard pronunciation, you should avoid such pronunciation in formal condition. And in my hometown and many other places, ...


1

Adding to @Claw's answer, Standard Cantonese used to have (and I heard in some dialects still has) TWO falling tones (and thus a total of 7 tones). This is still acknowledged in modern-ish dictionaries like the one published by CIHK. The former tone #2 was a high-mid falling tone, akeen to Hakka's fourth tone.


1

I'm living in Zigong, Sichuan now. There's no fixed pronunciation of many characters among Sichuan. When mentioned 佛山(A city in Guangdong), young people may say fo2, because Mandarin was spoken in more and more occasions. When referring to a local place, food, ancient things, people prefer to speak fu2 (佛教,大佛,牛佛烘肘). In addition, experts thought Pinyin has ...


1

I tried the 漢語方言大辭典, and there are many places with the fu pronunciation in the southwest mandarin area, for example 佛豆 (= 蠶豆, fava bean) is pronounced fu tou in 畢節; 佛瓜 (瓠瓜 gourd) is pronounced fu gua in 自貢, etc. Not really surprising; 弗 is fu in Mandarin.



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