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7

Yep, they do As you can find on the great and all knowing wiki, the word for tea in most languages comes from the Chinese: Cognate to Min tê: English tea Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian, and Swedish te Finnish and Estonian tee French thé German Tee Greek τέϊον Hebrew תה Indonesian and Malay teh A great many others Cognate to Mandarin chá: Greek τσάι ...


6

In MOST cases... Outside of Beijing, in texts, I believe the 儿 is still pronounced. But you can be sure that in spoken Chinese, it will never be pronounced (unless some kids are trying to mock the access by over accentuating it). I said in MOST cases because there are some words that have simply been adopted by non-Beijing'ers and will always be pronounced ...


6

Oh, get you a Taiwanese news (at 0:18 by the anchor, 0:58 by a student and 1:24, 1:56 by himself) about that, where it's pronounced as "niáng pào". I can tell that we use this word in mainland China too, here is the proof. It refers to a sissy (a boy that other boys dislike because he prefers doing things that girls enjoy).


6

In the International Phonetic Alphabet, for stop consonants, the three following categories are distinguished: (Truly) voiced stops. The vocalization begins before the release of the stop. Examples would be [b], [d], and [g] Voiceless, unaspirated stops. The vocalization begins simultaneously with the release of the stop. Examples: [p], [t], [k]. ...


5

I have asked this question before to native speakers, and their answer was the same as my natural intuition did in cases where I have read unknown characters. The most probable case is that the character is read with a similar pronunciation as one of its radicals. For example, many native Chinese speakers may not know with certainty how to pronounce the ...


5

(As I very recently learned) The standard pronunciation for 垃圾 is lājī in the PRC and lèsè in Taiwan An obvious question to ask is Why? Although I could not find an authoritative source, I have seen a number of claims that are very similar to each other. I'll refer to the talk page for 垃圾 on Wikipedia: ...


4

Your pronunciation is correct. This is a common mis-pronunciation in many places in China, not just Shanxi. In fact, this is so common that nearly every modern Chinese input software supports so called "模糊音"(ambiguous pronunciation). The user can config if this function is enabled. Here's a screenshot of the config in Google Pinyin software: As you can ...


4

I think it is a terrible mistake that the website has made, because there is no occasion when qu is pronounced tsʰu in Mandarin. Since you can actually tell the difference between u and ü, things should be easier for you now. You can just memorise that after (pinyin) j, q, x, y, ü is always written as u, and if you see u after j, q, x, y, it's always ...


4

I agree with TaraWordoor. You shouldn't be able to differentiate /er/ from /nr/ because when the sound /n/ is "erhua"-ed, you don't pronounce /n/ at all. So if you want to say 人儿, you're actually pronouncing /rer/. (BTW, these sounds are not in international phonetic alphabet. They're basically pinyin.) However, you should be able to hear the difference ...


4

I've made a chart here for my own understanding of Standard Mandarin Chinese phonology a while ago: a ai au an aŋ e ə əi əu ən əŋ i ia iai iau ian iaŋ ie iə iəu iən iəŋ io iu iuan iuə iun iuəŋ aɻ o u ua ...


4

Biang is an interesting character, being absent in many dictionaries, and having an unverified origin. I don't think it being uncommon is reason enough to consider its pronunciation to be non-standard, however. There are quite a few characters that have very uncommon pronunciations, so much so that for the rare ones, most native speakers would also find ...


4

There are three things going on here: 多 pronounced with a 2nd tone If you observe carefully, you may notice that all examples of 多 with 2nd tone occur when the following character is 4th tone. I believe this is an erroneous extension of the same rule for the characters "一" (yī) and "不" (bù), which both become 2nd tone when the following character is 4th ...


4

When encountering unknown characters, native speakers often refer to dictionaries, which have pinyin of the unknown character. While it is hard to guess the exact pronunciation of unknown characters, there are a subset of Chinese characters, called phonogram(形声字), whose pronunciation is related to part of the character. For example, 蛛(spider) has the same ...


3

As others explained, there are two qualities of these sounds which distinguish them in different languages: voicing and aspiration. I'll leave you to look up on Wikipedia what these mean exactly. In Mandarin Chinese, b is always unvoiced and unaspirated. p is always unvoiced and aspirated. In English, b is always voiced an unaspirated. p is always ...


3

Across the Northern China, 儿 is usually realised as an /r/ sound gluing to the previous sound (and may affect the previous sound in some accents). It is not pronounced independently as a character. In southern China, -儿 construction (or the so-called 儿化) is much less common, which only exists in a few phrases such as 一会儿 (actually I cannot think of a second ...


3

Answer to each question "When Beijingers use words like…" Assume that by "Beijingers", you mean those who born in or near Beijing, so do their parents or close relatives, growing up in a Beijing native people community, and not necessarily living in Beijing all the time of a year. "When Beijingers use words like 一点儿, the ending syllable will be very ...


3

Nowadays schoolchildren are taught Pinyin pretty thoroughly first, so they know how to correctly pronounce Pinyin. Then when learning new words, all they have to do is learn the Pinyin. A lot of primary/elementary textbooks will have annotations like this: Here's a typical Chinese primary school blackboard: Here's a Taiwanese equivalent of this sort of ...


2

In my experience, I would say region is has a big influence on how the r sound is pronounced. For instance, I know an older aiyi from GuangDong who says yan2. This is due to her being more familiar with Cantonese pronunciation. The younger generation who are educated more in Mandarin from school and TV, say the traditional ren2 with more of an r sound.


2

It is an ancient pronunciation of that Chinese character. Because Chinese chess has been created for more than 2000 years. During this period of time, pronunciations of many characters have changed, "車" is one of them. But because this game has been widely spread, this ancient pronunciation has been retained. This pronunciation is only used in this game.


2

as Stumpy Joe Pete said, you'll be hard pressed to find a font that works in all cases, and that you may want to look into a browser extension that highlights, magnifies, and explains the character you've hovered over. I recommend Pera Pera Kun: http://www.perapera.org/ They have extensions for FireFox and Chrome. Here's a snapshot: I have never seen ...


2

The simple answer is yes, it is a phonologically possible syllable in Mandarin Chinese. Remember for every Chinese syllable, there is a initial + final + tone , in this case, b is the initial, iang is the final, and the tone is 2, So the three factors complete its qualification as a Mandarin Chinese syllable.


2

The problem is than pinyin x also sounds "like" an English sh. I'm pre-embryonic at Chinese but I've been an armchair linguist for years and I'm in China trying to pick up Mandarin right now. Both Pinyin sh and x are different from English sh. In English sh your tongue is at the ridge just behind your upper teeth. In Pinyin sh your tongue bends backwards ...


2

In class, I can see that as a problem. I agree the best approach is the teacher asking them to repeat themselves again and again, particularly while doing reading. I could really feel the pressure so I knew I had to know exactly which tone it was, and then be definitive in what I said. There was a lot of 再說一次. However, once people are outside of class, I ...


2

I come from a family that speaks Cantonese, and we say 三更半夜 (although my mother says 半夜三更 I don't know why). 三更半夜 refers to "midnight" (doesn't have to be exactly 12:00 am, but some time around 11:00 pm and 2:00 am mainly). One time I was still up at 1:30 am and my father comes in and says 「現在三更半夜,你還沒有睡覺嗎?」. Basically what he was saying was, "It is very ...


1

This is my favorite question so far. We can only guess! For example, I don't know how to pronounce character 笪, what can I do? Well, I will pronounce as 旦(dan4). Is that correct? Maybe or maybe not.(Actually it is da2) Let me give you one more example, I don't know how to pronounce character 啝 so I will just pronounce 和(he2), and in this case, it's ...


1

For Chinese (native language speaker), someone from south of China may have issue to distinguish between an and ang, en and eng, in and ing, s and sh, c and ch, z and zh, but never mix b and p. They are totally different.


1

I've looked for a similar font (with pinyin on top, or bottom) and have not found anything. There are a lot of naysayers on this thread, and I'm not sure why. Such a font would be extremely useful, even given the limitations. Creation of such a font would be automatic using publicly available databases, and even if the original fonts were copyrighted, one ...


1

The answer is pao4 (the most common pronunciation) 如法炮製、炮烙 are pao2 炮羊肉 is bao1 When pronouced pào, it usually means artillery. 鞭炮: firecracker 炮兵、炮手: artilleryman páo means burn or roast 如法炮製 is an idiom, means follow suit. 炮烙 is a ancient torture (stamp on someone's body with burning iron) And bāo means stir-fry or drying 炮羊肉: stir-fry lamb 炮乾: ...


1

If I were teaching my daughter a new character, let's say 浅, I would say it very slow: 七-----衣-----安-----, and let her repeat very slow in the same way, then increase the speed gradually to the normal speed, which makes it sound like 千, then aske her to put the 3rd tone on it to get 浅 qiǎn. For 禁, it will be 鸡----阴----, and we get jin, then put 1st or 4th ...


1

This is something that also always confuses me when reading pinyin... In zhuyin, though, the zh for zhong is ㄓ, while the ch in Chong is ㄔ, ㄓ is pronounced more like the English "dr" sound, and ㄔ is pronounced more like the English "tr" sound. Also, the qi sound is ㄑ,which is pronounced like the English "chi" sound, and the xi sound is ㄒ, which is pronounced ...



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