Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

The only correct answer is "TA MA DE". This is the equivalent version of "F**K" in Chinese. I never hear people pronounce as "Di". Thinking it in other way, it will be too soft and feminine if it's pronounced as "Di". It supposed to be strong and speak with hatred.


10

Linguists divide pre-modern Chinese broadly into two periods: Old Chinese and Middle Chinese. I wanted to preface my answer by noting that Bernhard Karlgren used the term "Ancient Chinese" to refer specifically to Middle Chinese, and it appears that your questions seem to be referring to Middle Chinese as well, though I will be making a note about Old ...


8

You're right. Chinese people read Kanji using their Chinese pronunciations. For Chinese people who don't speak Japanese, they have probably only learned 'tokyo' from the English word and they don't have a clue what 'akihabara' is. The same applies to nouns, proper nouns and names.


7

Yes, there are rules - it is not irregular at all. The two different pronunciations of 阿 actually reflect different usages. The original Old Chinese pronunciation of ē is for using the character as a verb or noun, which is what the character 阿 originally meant. In contrast, the later pronunciation of ā emerged as a particle with completely different ...


6

In recent years, Mainland Chinese have officially adopted shuōfú across the board. If you only wish to be understood and/or conform to current official standards, a sufficient answer is: just use the shuōfú pronunciation. Everyone will understand what you mean regardless of whether they agree with it. For a more academic answer: Strictly speaking, shuìfú ...


6

How was it pronounced in older times (i.e. Middle Chinese)? I haven't found a record of 瞓 in classical Chinese, but since 瞓 and 训 are both read as fan in Cantonese, I'll take 训 instead. It is read qhuns in reconstructed Old Chinese that is before the 1st century B.C. In Middle Chinese it is pronounced as hyonh. How did the pronunciations ...


5

As an addendum, two brief comments regarding how tones are reflected in the languages that borrowed a lot of vocabulary from Chinese: According to the Wikipedia page on ‘Sino-Xenic pronunciations’, “[m]ost Middle Chinese tones were preserved in the tones of Middle Korean, but these have since been lost in all but a few dialects.” The source cited seems ...


5

Still should be shan1 but probably they have some 翘舌音 problems, i.e. cant pronounce ch, sh, zh etc. A lot of Chinese variants don't have 翹舌音 so these pronunciations become problematic. Count it as an accent.


5

The 的 here is acting as the possessive, so this means: His mother's... From the context that you have shown, 他妈的 should be pronounced: Ta Ma De


5

In the International Phonetic Alphabet, for stop consonants, the three following categories are distinguished: (Truly) voiced stops. The vocalization begins before the release of the stop. Examples would be [b], [d], and [g] Voiceless, unaspirated stops. The vocalization begins simultaneously with the release of the stop. Examples: [p], [t], [k]. ...


5

When encountering unknown characters, native speakers often refer to dictionaries, which have pinyin of the unknown character. While it is hard to guess the exact pronunciation of unknown characters, there are a subset of Chinese characters, called phonogram(形声字), whose pronunciation is related to part of the character. For example, 蛛(spider) has the same ...


5

I have asked this question before to native speakers, and their answer was the same as my natural intuition did in cases where I have read unknown characters. The most probable case is that the character is read with a similar pronunciation as one of its radicals. For example, many native Chinese speakers may not know with certainty how to pronounce the ...


5

I've made a chart here for my own understanding of Standard Mandarin Chinese phonology a while ago: a ai au an aŋ e ə əi əu ən əŋ i ia iai iau ian iaŋ ie iə iəu iən iəŋ io iu iuan iuə iun iuəŋ aɻ o u ua ...


5

Very interesting question. Like what @AwQiruiGuo has said, 地 should be pronounced as [de] (in speech, that is). And indeed the mentioned singer does not speak perfect Mandarin. However, this questions has more complicated background and should not be simply explained as the personal accent of the singer. Because in the case of songs, pronounciation ...


5

I think you're doing it right. The alveo-palatal part of sound (which j/x/q have in common) should be created by the gap between the middle of your tongue and the roof of your mouth, and that's exactly what 'alveo-palatal' means. The difference among j/x/q though, aspiration and frication, are controlled by other part of the mouth, but I don't think that's ...


4

Should be De, although 的 can also be pronounced as Di, but it has a different usage, such as 的確, 目的.


4

"他媽的" is a brief form of "他媽的屄(bi)", where 屄(bi) is a noun, meaning = woman's sex organ (may be offensive for somebody) So the pronunciation of 的 here should be /de/ in neutral tone.


4

It's quite clear that there is no difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ" in the 1987 成都话方言词典 as you have shown. If you look at page 26 of the dictionary, you can see everything that starts with "ẓ" in the particular Chengdu Pinyin system that they have, listed from ẓán to ẓùn. Really then, this is a typographical question. Looking at the page, you see that there's ...


4

The 的 has two kinds of pronunciation, De and Di. Different pronunciation is used for different cases. In 他妈的, the 的 is pronounced like: De, which makes the whole thing: Ta Ma De. I also never hear people say Ta Ma Di. In case you didn't know, 他妈的 or 他麻痹(Ta Ma Bi) means Mother F**ker in English. Hope this helps!


4

'e' is the older pronunciation and is used to reflect the older pronunciation in some particular words (usually more formal words), such as 阿胶 (ē jiāo, some animal gelatin), 阿房宫(ē páng gōng -- notice that 房 is pronounced páng instead of fáng), 阿谀奉承. 'a' is the modern and default pronunciation, used in translation of foreign names (e.g., Algebria - 阿尔及利亚) as ...


4

First and foremost, I think it's very dangerous to try to approximate Mandarin sounds with parts of English words, partly because we all pronounce English slightly differently and partly because some sounds just don't exist in English. There is no "ü" [y] in English, so trying to use English here will just trap students and never really allow them to learn ...


4

There are three things going on here: 多 pronounced with a 2nd tone If you observe carefully, you may notice that all examples of 多 with 2nd tone occur when the following character is 4th tone. I believe this is an erroneous extension of the same rule for the characters "一" (yī) and "不" (bù), which both become 2nd tone when the following character is 4th ...


4

I found listening to music really helped when learning - artists from Taiwan and the south tend to sing more clearly in my opinion. perhaps you could start there. Also, it is worth noting that in English we have around 8000 unique syllables, whereas in (mandarin) Chinese there are only around 400 (multiply this by 4 for the tones).


4

Generally speaking, in modern practice, Chinese speakers pronouce mixed English letters as is. for example: 5A级景区 is pronouced as "wu3 ei1 ji2 jing3 qu1" 阿Q正传 is somehow different, because the author had explicitely mentioned in this novelette that Q should be pronounced as 桂 or 贵. (Note that back in the era of this novelette Chinese people were just ...


4

It's the 4th in 一概而论, both regions: Check. e.g.: Mainland: 在线新华字典 Taiwan: 教育部重编国语字典 (Both URLs point to the '一概而论' entry) 论 does have a 2nd tone reading, but 论语 seems to be the only where it is used.


4

Old Pekin dialect (>50 years ago) pronounce it as lin(4th tone) and that might be influencing some other dialects. I am not sure about the situation in TW, but mandarin standard is lun(4th tone) except for 论语, habitually lun (2nd tone).


3

I think maybe your friend is referring to "ma de", which literally means "your mother" but colloquially means "f**k". Actually, there's a slow, drawn out way to say this, which is "maaaa de", which means "f**k", "s**t"... but honestly, without the "de" (which sounds like "duh"), no one will misinterpret your meaning (or lack of meaning) by simply saying ...


3

The translation for "your verification code is 1234" in Chinese should be "您的认证码是 一 二 三 四" or "您的认证码是 1 2 3 4" in your code. Note: “1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10” are pronounced as "yi1 er4 san1 si4 wu3 liu4 qi1 ba1 jiu3 shi2" in Chinese. are written as "一 二 三 四 五 六 七 八 九 十" in Chinese.


3

This might be historical reasons. According to some discussions in other forums, 'Di' pronunciation was common in almost all songs before 1995. After 2000, almost all are pronounced as 'De' -- the same as speaking. If you sing late songs with 'Di' sound, it sounds really weird, because it is no longer common in spoken languages.


3

I try to give you an answer from what a native speaker thinks. The two pronunciations have different meanings. According to the dictionary, 着(zhao1) has the following definitions: ● 着 zhāo ㄓㄠˉ  1. 下棋时下一子或走一步:~法。~数。一~儿好棋。  2. 计策,办法:高~儿。没~儿了。  3. 放,搁进去:~点儿盐。  4. 应答声,表示同意:这话~哇!~,你说得真对! You can see the closest meaning is "2. 计策,办法 -- strategy, measure". ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible