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Old Pekin dialect (>50 years ago) pronounce it as lin(4th tone) and that might be influencing some other dialects. I am not sure about the situation in TW, but mandarin standard is lun(4th tone) except for 论语, habitually lun (2nd tone).


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It's the 4th in 一概而论, both regions: Check. e.g.: Mainland: 在线新华字典 Taiwan: 教育部重编国语字典 (Both URLs point to the '一概而论' entry) 论 does have a 2nd tone reading, but 论语 seems to be the only where it is used.


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As a native English speaker, I've found that after leaving China for four years now, my ability to remember tones has been negatively affected. Second, is remembering words. Weirdly enough, having not read much these past years, I never really lost an reading comprehension (though as before I may forget the meaning of a word and/or its pronunciation). The ...


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I am a Taiwanese. I have the same problem of English vocabulary lol. However, learning English is easier because the most of the newest news are written by English. You should find a person to practice it each day. One day an hour or more is better for your learning : ). Also, you can listen some Chinese song. It can help you to remember words faster. ...


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Studies have shown that if you grow up in a language environment where speakers do not distinguish between two sounds, your brain will lose the ability to easily perceive the difference between them. A notable example of this phenomenon is the inability for most Japanese speakers to distinguish between r and l. Jiangsu is an area where the Wu Chinese ...


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Since final consonants in Mandarin are not as firm as those in, say, Cantonese and English, people who speak Mandarin often relay on vowel quality to distinguish the -n/ng pair. -in is of course realized as a front vowel /i/, while -ing often has a tint of back vowel, which someone may find similar to Pinyin i+eng. I think it is perfectly acceptable to ...


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I can testify that some locals in Hebei (Yantai) will pronounce 天津 as Tianjing. Therefore, this phenomenon is seemingly not isolated to Jiangsu.


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In Standard Chinese those are two different consonants, much the same as 'n' in [English] 'kin' and 'ng' in 'king'. In IPA the final -ng is transcribed as [ŋ] while n is [n]. (By the way I have spent some time in Jiangsu and never noticed that local people would not distinguish these two consonants.)


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I think you're doing it right. The alveo-palatal part of sound (which j/x/q have in common) should be created by the gap between the middle of your tongue and the roof of your mouth, and that's exactly what 'alveo-palatal' means. The difference among j/x/q though, aspiration and frication, are controlled by other part of the mouth, but I don't think that's ...


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You can do this with Google Translate. To get downloads in mp3 format, see responses to this Stack Exchange question.



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