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11

A rule of thumb is to look for the radical that seems to be more prominent. For those characters, it's pretty easy: In 烋, notice how 灬 spans the entire character horizontally: it is the radical (火) Same thing applies to 想 : 心 is the radical. As a bonus, in 强 which you have in your name, 弓 is the radical: notice how it spans the entire character vertically ...


10

TL;DR : 饣 is the phonetic, not the signific. 饣, which is simplified from 食, is the radical of 饰/飾 only in the sense that it is listed that way in a Chinese dictionary. It is not the meaning-bearing part of the character. Here are two possible analyses. In both cases, 饣 is contributing to the pronunciation, not the meaning: 飾 = 食 (phonetic: shi2) + 布 ...


10

This radical is called the 双耳旁 or 双二刀, due to it looking somewhat like an ear or the 刀 character. There are actually two radicals depending on whether it's placed to the left or right: 左耳刀 if on the left, 右耳刀 if on the right. The two radicals have different origins and different meanings. http://baike.baidu.com/view/457766.htm The left version is derived ...


9

According to zdic.net, 饰 is formed of 巾, 人, and 食 (饣). 食 (饣) is the sound component, while the other portion suggests the meaning. The dictionary explains the character's components this way: 形声。从巾,从人,食声。人佩巾有装饰作用。 So, it's a 'pictophonetic' character which signifies a person wearing or adorned with a cloth, thus having the effect of decoration. If you're ...


8

There are many simplified characters' radical has nothing to do with the character itself,the only reason for this is just simplify characters,i have some examples(found on the web): 1) Without the heart, how to love 2) Looking back the village, the man has already left 3) No morals, because it is none of my business 4) The leader has ...


7

I feel like this question could elicit subjective and open-ended answers, but here goes anyway ... In Beijing, one of the classes I had was a dedicated 汉字 (Hànzì, Chinese character) class. In it, we were learning the most common radicals, and some word examples that contain that radical. We learnt how, often, the meaning is conveyed by the radical and the ...


6

I can only provide a partial answer: Many of the characters used in the names of non-Han ethnic groups were originally derogatory. After the founding of the PRC, the government conceptualized New China as a 多民族国家, and they changed many of the characters that were perceived as derogatory. I don't know if this process started under the 国民党, as you suggest, ...


6

Before answering of which radical 将 should be, let me introduce some authoritative reference books. For traditional Chinese: 康熙字典 (compiled in Qing Dynasty) and 說文解字 (compiled in Eastern Han Dynasty by Xu Shen). The online dictionary I highly recommend is 漢典. For simplified Chinese: 新华字典. Its online version is 在线新华字典. However, I find the online version is ...


6

The online chinese dictionary MDBG provides radical information for every character in its database. For instance, if you search for the character 天 (tiān) and click on the first result, the "Rad/Str" column reads 大 + 1, i.e., the radical 大 plus one stroke. Zhongwen.com also gives information on character decomposition. The entry for 洋 reads "Water 水 with 羊 ...


5

The etymology part of the YellowBridge dictionary will show you this. Look up any character here, then click on etymology, and you will see the radicals in the 'etymology explorer'.


5

The former interpretation is correct. Chinese characters are composed of components (some radicals, some phonetics, some neither). For many of the components, there are standard or widely used ways to refer to them. A common pattern is {component}+字+{旁/头/盖/底/儿/框}. (The last part refers to which part of the character it is--e.g., side, top, bottom, "frame") ...


5

On http://ctext.org/dictionary.pl?if=en you can see how a character evolved, the simplified and traditional characters. For example for 目. Another similar website is http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx . Their result for 目. Zdict is completely in Chinese: http://www.zdic.net/zd/zi/ZdicE7Zdic9BZdicAE.htm Here is another website in ...


5

I'm also finding conflicting sources. For example according to the reference work Chinese Characters: A Genealogy and Dictionary it's also 羊 + 女. Similarly, still in the same work, 美 is 羊 + 大. Often when characters are combined they are slightly changed to make the character more compact and I think that is what has happened here. However when I look at ...


5

說文解字 has both references for 氣 and 气. Put simply, 气 and 氣 comes from different origin and somehow merge together into one stream later. In detail: 米 is not added to 气 to get 氣 in Tang Dynasty. Long time ago, 氣 appears in the form of Bronze inscription, though different meaning as 气. 氣 is originally designed to mean the "air generated from digesting food". ...


5

Install input method tools such as Google Pinyin Windows only type u start to input then type follow to input radicals 丨 shu 竖 一 heng 横 丿 pie 撇 礻 shi 示 衤 yi 衣 But I think most easy way is Ctrl+C,Ctrl+V There is a list of radicals. Find it and copy it.


5

As @50-3 has mentioned, the 难 is the simplification of the traditional character 難. Most Chinese characters are phono-semantic compounds (形声字), in which the radical hints at the meaning while the phonetic hints at the pronunciation. In the case of 難, the phonetic component is 堇 while the radical is 隹. In modern Chinese, the pronunciation of 堇 has diverged ...


4

On wiki, this part is defined as "phonetic". I am not familiar with these jargons in English, but I thinks this one is acceptable. In your case,"艮"(gèn or gěn) is really a character. Edit: Add Chinese names for this part We call these characters “形声字”(in modern Chinese, many characters can be classified into this type). 形 means "form", referring to the ...


4

This question could probably best be answered by Wikipedia as there are many, many methods. One relatively common one is to look up the character by stroke count, then by stroke order. In this system, there are five types of strokes - horizontal stroke, vertical stroke, etc. and each is assigned a number. This is the method used to look up characters in ...


4

From my experience, knowing the radicals does help to categorise characters in your head and it's somethign you can hold on to. However, I have no learned them in isolation, each time I learn a new word I make sure to look up the word in the dictionary which mentions the radical. I don't think it's helpful to learn 200+ radicals off the bat. For one some ...


4

Chinese native speakers don't treat 田 由 甲 申 甴 电 as related radicals. It is true that those radicals look very similar to each other, but we don't go further than that. We don't have any terms for this phenomenon, because we don't think it is something that needs special attention/study. Here are more examples: 刀 vs 力, 土 vs 士, 己 vs 已 vs 巳, 冂 vs 几, etc. In ...


4

As far as I know, all radicals have meaning. The one you are talking about is 阝(fù) and called "Radical 170" (when used on the left, meaning mound or dam) or "Radical 163" (when used on the right, meaning city) while the Unicode dictionary says the radical means 'place'. Given the two examples you listed, it does relate to this meaning. ...


3

I am learning some written Mandarin through memrise.com, and their approach when introducing a new word, is to explain all the different part first, so you end up learning all the radicals naturally. I think it works better than learning them in isolation, because you can immediately relate to how they could be used.


3

Let me connect the dots for @EdenHarder (but comment box is too narrow...) Explanation 漢文 夫飾者 形聲字也 據典[1]之二五七二頁 然竊以為會意也 參此及此 殷商有祭祀者 食諸神袛以祭牲 飾牛牲以布匹 苟無食 何以有飾 飾者 从巾 从人 食聲 讀若式 一曰襐飾 賞隻切 據典[2] 恭候有疑 English Signific or phonetic, imagine in an ancestor worship or toward a deity in ancient times (e.g. Shang), people present with food, covered with cloth; or ...


3

My favorite online dictionary, Nciku lets you draw in a character, and then tells you what it is. Super useful if you can't find out what the radical is, or just want a quicker way to look something out. My favorite iOS app, Pleco has this functionality, along with Optical Character Recognition (OCR) so you can hold up/take pictures of one or more ...


3

In short, ⺷ could be a variant of 羊 in the past, and is the radical form of 羊 when written in the upper of a character. Historically, ⺷ could be used as 羊 with the same meaning and pronunciation. 《字彙補》, a Qing Dynasty dictionary, gave the definition 『⺷,疑羊字之訛。』 that ⺷ could be a (possibly erroneous) variant of 羊. While Jin Dynasty's 《四聲篇海》 thinks that the ...


3

In my opinion, 三点水 and shui3 are all correct names for 氵, so for 饣. Actually, 氵is also 水, just in another face. You can know this by comparing Chinese Seal Character(小篆) 河:http://www.zdic.net/z/1c/zy/6CB3.htm 水:http://www.zdic.net/z/1c/zy/6C34.htm 三点水 is more formal, shui3 is most used in computer world. Hope my explanation can help you understand this ...


2

Another user here runs a site called HanziJS that does what you're asking for. (Sorry, I can't remember that user's name, but I discovered his website while reading here!) http://hanzijs.com/


2

Your question is totally wrong on itself! “犭”(反犬旁/犬部) is a radical of Chinese Characters (Han-Zi,汉字) which is only for forming/making up some single Chinese Characters. In the creating era aka ancient times, people used “犭”(a radical, the variant of 犬 i.e. dogs) to make some Characters which is with some relation to beast such as ...


2

As mentioned in a question on searching by character parts, tatoeba.org has several tools related to character structure. The one you're interested in would be the one that explodes a character. It's not perfect, and your 天 example produced this: 一 大 大 一 大 大 However, 他 produced this: 亻 也 乜 丨 乚 乛 人 You can always go to the source data at wikimedia ...



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