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11

Brief Answer Q1. The Wiktionary list of characters with the 冫 radical contains the following two characters: 冬, 冭. Where in these characters is the 冫? Are the two lines at the bottom supposed to be the ice radical? Answer: You're right. That's true. Q2. When I look at the entry for 永 in the Chinese dictionary app on my phone (Pleco), then it says ...


6

you need to identify the prototype of radicals.for your example,the prototype of辶is走,the ptototype of 扌is手,草for艹,水for氵,冰for冫......,then you just type the prototype and find the radical.


5

You can consider radicals as affix and suffix, and when you see a common english word, most time you will not consider what's the affix and suffix means, because you know the word meaning, only when you consider on the word's source, you will discuss with the affix and suffix, that's same to Chinese. And, when you encounter a word that you don't familiar or ...


4

This is a very interesting question unfortunately I cannot vote up yet due to a lack of reputation (so I build it up now with a hopefully good answer). My wife's Chinese and that of one of my linguistics professor Vietnamese (read up on their writing system, it's quite interesting!). I'm not studying linguistics, but because of the origins of our wives we ...


3

If you want to study character's origin, you have to look up references like 說文解字 instead of Wiktionary, which may be incomplete or incorrect. The original character of 冰 is 仌. You may look up the original text of 說文解字 here. When it is in 冬, it becomes two lines at the bottom as you describe. 冫is not simplified from 氷, but 氷 is simplified from 冰, which is ...


2

One. Characters can be made up of -or- contain lots of "radicals" but there will only be one that is the actual radical. For instance the character 落 has both 艹 and 氵as components but it's radical is only one: 艹. Characters can also have simplified & traditional radicals. For example: 卡 has a simplified radical of: 丨 and a traditional radical: 卜 - ...


2

氷 is just equal to 冰 from pronunce to meaning. But modern Chinese doesn't use this character, Japanese use it as 冰. 永 is made part by 水, so it is considered radicals by 水 (not 冫), and actually it's orgininal meaning in ancient Chinese is long water or water long in writing sequence, that's how it is contacted with water. And it's meaning transfered to ...


1

Could you share the context where you encountered this character? I'm almost certain that this character is only used in geographic names nowadays, for example, 阜阳 or 阜成门. This is why you could not find it in modern translations of the words dam or mound, because even most Chinese people would not understand the meaning of this single character 阜.


1

Yes you do, you just have to look further down the results of Google image search (and I wasn't expecting the top most images =.=). However, I don't think 阜 means dam, but it does mean mound, though in 99% cases it would be 土丘 or some other words because 阜 does not appear in conversational Chinese as far as I know. You get images related to ears because 阝 ...


1

辶 I got it from translate.google.com I just hand or mouse write it, and I do not need to remember anything else.


1

Microsoft's Chinese IME is probably not your best choice. 搜狗's IME displays 辶 by typing chuo. The same is true of iOS's and OS's IMEs. Radicials seem to have pinyin names as well, these pinyin in general should be able to type up the radicals: for example 讠 can also be typed up by inserting the pinyin yan into any IME (Microsoft not included, probably). ...



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