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10

This radical is called the 双耳旁 or 双二刀, due to it looking somewhat like an ear or the 刀 character. There are actually two radicals depending on whether it's placed to the left or right: 左耳刀 if on the left, 右耳刀 if on the right. The two radicals have different origins and different meanings. http://baike.baidu.com/view/457766.htm The left version is derived ...


7

I feel like this question could elicit subjective and open-ended answers, but here goes anyway ... In Beijing, one of the classes I had was a dedicated 汉字 (Hànzì, Chinese character) class. In it, we were learning the most common radicals, and some word examples that contain that radical. We learnt how, often, the meaning is conveyed by the radical and the ...


5

As @50-3 has mentioned, the 难 is the simplification of the traditional character 難. Most Chinese characters are phono-semantic compounds (形声字), in which the radical hints at the meaning while the phonetic hints at the pronunciation. In the case of 難, the phonetic component is 堇 while the radical is 隹. In modern Chinese, the pronunciation of 堇 has diverged ...


5

Install input method tools such as Google Pinyin Windows only type u start to input then type follow to input radicals 丨 shu 竖 一 heng 横 丿 pie 撇 礻 shi 示 衤 yi 衣 But I think most easy way is Ctrl+C,Ctrl+V There is a list of radicals. Find it and copy it.


5

說文解字 has both references for 氣 and 气. Put simply, 气 and 氣 comes from different origin and somehow merge together into one stream later. In detail: 米 is not added to 气 to get 氣 in Tang Dynasty. Long time ago, 氣 appears in the form of Bronze inscription, though different meaning as 气. 氣 is originally designed to mean the "air generated from digesting food". ...


4

From my experience, knowing the radicals does help to categorise characters in your head and it's somethign you can hold on to. However, I have no learned them in isolation, each time I learn a new word I make sure to look up the word in the dictionary which mentions the radical. I don't think it's helpful to learn 200+ radicals off the bat. For one some ...


4

Chinese native speakers don't treat 田 由 甲 申 甴 电 as related radicals. It is true that those radicals look very similar to each other, but we don't go further than that. We don't have any terms for this phenomenon, because we don't think it is something that needs special attention/study. Here are more examples: 刀 vs 力, 土 vs 士, 己 vs 已 vs 巳, 冂 vs 几, etc. In ...


4

As far as I know, all radicals have meaning. The one you are talking about is 阝(fù) and called "Radical 170" (when used on the left, meaning mound or dam) or "Radical 163" (when used on the right, meaning city) while the Unicode dictionary says the radical means 'place'. Given the two examples you listed, it does relate to this meaning. ...


3

In my opinion, 三点水 and shui3 are all correct names for 氵, so for 饣. Actually, 氵is also 水, just in another face. You can know this by comparing Chinese Seal Character(小篆) 河:http://www.zdic.net/z/1c/zy/6CB3.htm 水:http://www.zdic.net/z/1c/zy/6C34.htm 三点水 is more formal, shui3 is most used in computer world. Hope my explanation can help you understand this ...


3

I am learning some written Mandarin through memrise.com, and their approach when introducing a new word, is to explain all the different part first, so you end up learning all the radicals naturally. I think it works better than learning them in isolation, because you can immediately relate to how they could be used.


3

Let me connect the dots for @EdenHarder (but comment box is too narrow...) Explanation 漢文 夫飾者 形聲字也 據典[1]之二五七二頁 然竊以為會意也 參此及此 殷商有祭祀者 食諸神袛以祭牲 飾牛牲以布匹 苟無食 何以有飾 飾者 从巾 从人 食聲 讀若式 一曰襐飾 賞隻切 據典[2] 恭候有疑 English Signific or phonetic, imagine in an ancestor worship or toward a deity in ancient times (e.g. Shang), people present with food, covered with cloth; or ...


2

Inescapable Radicals I think knowledge of radicals is inescapable as many dictionaries have at least one index organised around radicals and stroke count. I find it easier to learn characters (and related characters) using radicals. These relations between characters assist in overall comprehension and multiply the number of characters one can recognise ...


2

饰 was first and ritual related to worship with cattle and other food in ancient China. For example,《周礼·地官·封人》:“凡祭祀,饰其牛牲。” So, 饰 has the 饣radical.


2

They are called 部首. And, in antique dictionaries like 康熙字典, they are referred to as 部. It is very formal and scholarly to address the whole bunch of characters containing 氵 or 水(at the bottom) or other parts showing links to 水 as 水部. The logic here is ''the original character of the radical' + 部', following the rules of classical Chinese. However, in ...


2

Being able to recognise radicals is very helpful; they sort of provide visual cues for what a character mean or sound like (but there's also traps!). That said, I don't know how useful specifically trying to memorise the radicals is. I'd thought you would naturally pick it up after you've learnt a few characters.


2

Actually if you can look at the traditional form of this character. The upper part is "丣".“丣” work as a phonetic radical here because it is pronounced you3. A lot of characters have been simplified in Mandarin in main land China. This make it harder for us to break down a character. You can find more information here: 汉典解释 So the first thing to do when ...


1

Actually it depends on what you mean by "radical" which can stand for both "偏旁"(pian1pang2) and "部首"(bu4shou3) in Chinese. They are such ambiguous concepts that even some Chinese teacher can get confused, according to Baidu Baike: “偏旁部首”常常连在一起说,于是有些教师就认为“偏旁”和“部首”是一回事,这是一种误解。偏旁和部首,虽然有某些联系,却是两个不同的概念。 The two concepts are different in that while "部首" ...


1

Partial answer Given to the best of my knowledge and a little research Wikipedia defines a Radical as: a graphical component of a Chinese character under which the character is traditionally listed in a Chinese dictionary. So declaring which dictionary you're referencing would be a big help as not all are based off Kangxi radicals. But let's take a ...


1

As a native Chinese speaker, My teacher told me that 氵 called 三点水 and 饣 called 食字旁. Actually, we never call 氵 as 水. It's a little strange. The link wikibooks you gave is exactly the right answer to your question.



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