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5

I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier and I'm even more surprised no one thought of this before me, well, I'm sure someone did just didn't find it on the internet. I was installing fonts and noticed some of the fonts that came with my operating system - OS X Mountain Lion - was cursive Chinese. So a thought occurred to me. Cut and paste the same ...


5

Well, this is what Japanese speakers do when they look at a Chinese text – they have some understanding of it since they recognize the characters. One fundamental problem, though, is that in modern Chinese, the majority of words are made up of two characters. There are two types of dictionary for Chinese, one that gives character meanings (字典) and one that ...


3

Before learning Cantonese, I used to read a lot of Chinese texts -- and I still do, even Mandarin texts, even though I don't speak Mandarin -- and I'd use the Korean reading of sinograms. For instance, 我是法國人 would be "아 시 법 국 인" / "a shi pǒp kuk in". So indeed I was able to read (and write) Chinese without being able to speak it... :-)


2

According to Zhonghua Zihai, the largest Chinese character dictionary, there are more than 85,000 Chinese characters! However, research (Huang 1994 and Da 2004) shows that the most frequently used 1200 Chinese Characters account for about 90% of the characters occurring in the real world. Therefore, this is about the number of characters needed for a learner ...


2

According to this paper, Chinese is indeed read at a measurably faster speed than English.


2

The modern handwriting scripts of Chinese characters are 楷书, 行书 and 草书. 楷书 is the standard and official handwriting script, which is made up by 笔画 (strokes) and looks like printing script. It is the only handwriting script taught in primary schools in China, because it is the only legal standard of handwriting script. 行书 is the handwriting script that ...


2

In my experience, the speed of reading Chinese and reading English are just not comparable. I can read a long paragraph written in Chinese at a single glance, and get almost all the essential meaning. Also, I could scan and locate the information I need in a hell long article almost instantly, provided it must be written in Chinese. I am trying to find a way ...


2

For Android, there is Pinyiner (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.astratech.chinesereader_free) . It works offline, you can even read books, mark new words and create flashcards.


2

Yes you can. Arthur Waley did, and we still owe him gratitude for beginning to open western eyes to Chinese literature. But that was 100 years ago, before electronics, before air travel, and Waley was a rare genius. Also Stumpy Joe Pete is entirely right. Profoundly deaf people can learn to read Chinese. But won't you say the words to yourself somehow ...


1

I believe so, but It's recommended to learn the pronunciation with it. learn the pronunciation you'll regret it if you dont


1

I asked a friend in 2001, how best to learn Chinese and he pointed me to the Bopomofo phonetic alphabet, and the schools and textbooks that use it. That alphabet gave me very quickly an unambiguous tool for phonetic reading and writing so i didn't feel so entirely illiterate, it helped me learn pronunciation, helped me 'forget' my western phonetic patterns, ...


1

EDIT: My answer to the first question is that the Official list of 2,000 characters contained in the book are what I would recommend. I am not qualified to answer regarding fluency and accept the answer of others. If you're interested in a good offline reference that you can study at length, I'd recommend McNaughton and Li's (1999) Reading & Writing ...


1

You would probably need to learn 500 for very basic communication, but to be able to talk to someone, 2000 is ok



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