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13

Yes. For Mandarin (Simplified Chinese): The Contemporary Chinese Dictionary (现代汉语词典): This one is for words and phrases. They have a version in both Chinese and English. Xinhua Dictionary (新华字典): this is for Chinese characters. Also available in both English and Chinese. I'm not too familiar with traditional dictionaries. But 國語日報辭典 seems pretty popular ...


6

Before answering of which radical 将 should be, let me introduce some authoritative reference books. For traditional Chinese: 康熙字典 (compiled in Qing Dynasty) and 說文解字 (compiled in Eastern Han Dynasty by Xu Shen). The online dictionary I highly recommend is 漢典. For simplified Chinese: 新华字典. Its online version is 在线新华字典. However, I find the online version is ...


6

There is one main difference between children's books and adult foreign textbooks: Adult foreign textbooks are designed to give foreigners the best chance to communicate in simple everyday circumstances. Children's books start with the very basics and require longer to get to the same place, however they provide you a much more solid base and a far wider ...


5

These two books have been recommended from another site (I haven't read these myself): An Introduction to Literary Chinese: Revised Edition (Harvard East Asian Monographs) by Michael Anthony Fuller (2004) A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese (Harvard East Asian Monographs) by Paul F. Rouzer (2007) Aside from learning yourself, another option is to ...


5

I have read some children's books and found that they can be helpful. However, there is one drawback that I've seen, which doesn't apply to textbooks. Some children's books are designed to help children learn to read. However, the assumption is that the children already know how to speak. Thus, the book helps new readers learn characters but assumes they ...


5

I learned Chinese through children's books as a child. I've suffered from NOT using children's books in other languages. What has happened in those languages is that I've learned a lot of "technical" terms, and can hold my own in "advanced" discussions. Then I trip over some grammar point or some every day phrase that every 10-year old native speaker knows. ...


5

There are three similar style guides for Chinese: 文后参考文献著录规则 GB/T 7714-2005 Appendix A Appendix B 科学技术报告、学位论文和学术论文的编写格式 GB7713-87 文摘编写规则 GB 6447-86


4

No. Children's books are written -- not surprisingly -- for little native speakers. These are little people who have an astonishingly broad vocabulary at age three. And that vocabulary includes many words that foreign learners of the language never pick up (or need, really.) What kid doesn't know the sounds that every animal makes, or the words for a bunch ...


4

Xinhua Dictionary is kind of a gold-standard for Chinese dictionaries, similar to the place Merriam-Webster holds in the English-speaking world.


4

According to An article on Chinese Government Official Website The differences of word usage may be explained like: “机车”在大陆一般指“用来牵引列车车厢的动力车,即火车头”,在台湾则指摩托车 To translate in English, "机车" in Mandarin means locomotive, while "机车" in Taiwan means motorcycle. one can buy a paper-based dictionary at amazon dot cn. I am not sure I can post urls to a ...


2

I've used a mixture of textbooks and children's books to practice reading. The biggest advantage to children's books is that I can read them together with my daughter. She's not very interested in my textbooks! The biggest thing to be careful of with children's books is to check which phonetic system they use before you buy or borrow them. Here in ...


2

Well. If you learn as an adult, usually you want to learn quickly. There are many specialised learning methods targeting adults, and they are very helpful. So, if you want to learn quick - don't use children books. But. If you have children. And if you read to them. This is another pair of shoes. Yes, even if it is you who wants to learn. If I read a ...


2

First, there is no legal source to download both of them. More specific, they're content of copyright. The Commercial Press has made great effort to ban online version to protect its interest. So you can hardly find the website which is providing PDF or other format. However, there's another way, but you'd pay a little money(~$2). Visit the greatest ...


2

Of course we have, you can see it on baidu.com. But because in China many provinces now have the right to have their own teaching syllabus, they may have different categorization of characters. But all the characters must come from the most common used 2500 characters. Then spread to the other characters.


2

We call these words "异形词" in Chinese. Definition from Wikipedia: 异形词,是指在普通话书面语中并存并用的同音(指声母、韵母和声调完全相同)、同义(指理性意义、色彩意义和语法意义完全相同)而书写形式不同的词语。例如:“笔画”和“笔划”、“按语”和“案语”、“唯一”和“惟一”等等。实际的使用当中,除了书写的差异之外,它们还有使用频率的不同,但是一般不会造成误解。 中华人民共和国教育部和国家语言文字工作委员会2002年3月31日发布试行了《第一批异形词整理表》。 在繁体中文里面,异形词现象也是存在的。而汉字简化并没有完全消除这些现象,所以从繁体中文中继承也是异形词的主要来源之一。 Here's a link for 《第一批异形词整理表》: ...


1

翳明 is just name of an acupuncture point. When we talk this to others, we usually just use the name itself. Here's a brief explanation of the name. The character 翳 means "cover/shield". In terms of medicine, it refers to corneal opacity. 明 in classical Chinese has the meaning of "make clear-sighted". So, the meaning of the name reads "remove opacity and get ...


1

There are plenty of places on the web where acupuncture points are mentioned in English like this: NeiGuan or Neiguan. In fact you can even do a plain Google search for "Neiguan" and there are plenty of results. There are also some listings for Yiming but this doesn't seem to be as well known. If you want to be precise I would add the Chinese next to it, ...


1

Wikipedia has a pretty thorough overview of the differences: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwanese_Mandarin



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