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10

There are a few differences between those three words: "以及" can only connect phrases,not words. The phrases after "以及" is commonly considered to secondary. "与" and "和" are used to express the relationship. "与" is more elegant than "和". such as "老人与海". "和" is mostly used in oral form. In some cases,"和" and "与" are somewhat interchangeable, such as ...


10

"的" in this case means "certainly", "really", "I am sure that..." as the conclusion says in your question. For me, such sentences are the same. 我会去看他的。 我一定会去看他。 You can say "我一定会去看他的". The mood sounds stronger (I think it's not much stronger), but I can't tell you how strong it is (this is a natural language, not math). I would use this when I want ...


9

被 + verb = passive form 根除 = eradicate 被根除 = be eradicated Some verbs have active form with passive meaning. 根除 is one of them. So it's fine to remove 被 from this sentence. (These verbs are very similar to ergative verbs in English but mainstream Chinese grammar doesn't interpret them as ergative verbs.)


8

I'm not sure if you are familiar with 的时候 but this translates approximately to 'while'. So the sentence reads: While I was eating I read a book. You can see the English use "I" twice, so it may make more sense to you if you read it like this: 我吃饭的时候(我)看了一本书


8

Overall both translations are fine and fluent, with some small issues below: Grammatical/Syntactic issues: I think there is only one issue, in (2) 我们想酒保因为要省钱的. Either use 要省钱 as verb (i.e. remove 的), or use 要省钱的 as adjective (i.e. add 是 before 要). Semantic issues: In (1), margarita mix is translated into 玛格丽特混合物. In Chinese, people don't refer food/drink ...


8

Grammatically 在 is required. Unlike in English 'here' is an adverb which can follow verb directly, in Chinese 这里 is a pronoun, in order to construct a V-O phrase, there must be a preposition in between. In colloquial language, people often omit 在, so it's also understood and appropriate, just less formal.


7

Yes, your guess is right. However, I think you should focus on the character "再" here. There are several such patterns with "再". The pattern "再 + verb + [], [] + 就 + []" is used to express a condition, a premise; remember that "过" here means "[time, etc] to pass, to elapse" and "再" means "to continue to do something" or "to do something again" here. This ...


7

I think you are close. Basically: 知道 = to know 我知道 = I know 我知道的 = What I know 就 = Just 這麼多 = this much 就這麼多了 = Just this much I personally wouldn't translate this as "Beyond this I know nothing." It would be closer to "What I know is just this much", however I would translate it as "I only know this much". I don't see where this sentence would ...


7

You can use 完 and 了 together or separately. 了 is usually used to indicate the completion of an action. E.g. 你买了好多东西 (You purchased a lot of stuff). See the question "Tense and use of 了" to learn more. 完 is used to indicate the action of completing/finishing something. E.g. "說話沒完的人" (a motormouth, someone who talks to no end). Usually it's verb + 完. 完了 ...


7

The time specification should be before the verb, but you can choose whether you put it before or after the subject. There is (a little bit) more emphasis on the first word. So you can either say 今天你吃什么了? or 你今天吃什么了? In case you have both a time description, a place description and explained how you did something (manner), the time should be first, then ...


7

It is part of the construction: 在....前 'before....' (used as a conjunction). Here it means 'Before you close the file, do you want to save it?' The 在 effectively indicates a point in time, i.e., 'at' a particular time. (Literally translated into English, this would become 'at [the time] before you close the file'). This is typical of constructions ...


6

Both sentences are correct. The word "人" is added to add emphasis to the physical location of the person. You can take 你现在在哪里? to mean "Where are you now?" And 你现在人在哪里? to mean "What is your current physical location?" The former is normally used when the asker and the subject are within the same locality (e.g in a shopping mall). The latter is often used ...


6

什麼都 can be used in both positive and negative statements while 什麼也 is usually used in negative statements. So, instead of focusing on the usage of 也 here, 什麼都 and 什麼也 can be regarded as phrases which are sometimes used interchangeably. For example: 我們以為什麼都知道,而實際上什麼也不知道。/ 我们以为什么都知道,而实际上什么也不知道。 One possible translation: We thought we knew/know ...


6

You can also use 好 to emphasize many: 我有好几个朋友 Wǒ yǒu hǎojǐ gè péngyǒu - I have lots of friends 好多人来看我 Hǎoduō rén lái kàn wǒ - Many people came to see me In this case the 好 is strongly emphasized. 好几个 = Lots 好多 = Very many To suggest some or a few: 我有几个朋友来看我 Wǒ yǒu jǐ gè péngyǒu lái kàn wǒ - I have some friends coming to see me ...


5

You can use (person) noun + 們, 很多 + noun, 幾 + classifier + noun or demonstrative pronoun + 些 + noun。 As in: 朋友們 ([some] friends) 很多朋友 ([many] friends) 这些朋友 ([these] friends) 幾個朋友 ([how many/some number of] friends) 多數的 + noun can also be used to signify "the majority/large portion of" the noun.


5

Briefly, I'd parse them as I ate dinner and watched a movie. I'll watch a movie after I eat dinner. After I ate dinner, I watched a movie. OR I'll watch a movie after I've eaten dinner. 以后 corresponds exactly to the English equivalent of 'after', while 了 has some more leeway in how it's used. All three of your sentences imply that you ate, and then you ...


5

This is classical Chinese, not modern Chinese. Normally in Classical Chinese 所 stands for an omitted object of a verb. 所 + Verb means ‘Verb 的东西 (the thing that is verb-ed), which is equivalent to a kind of relative clause marker (RM) in English ‘what/that is Verb-ed’. It makes the sentence passive. The 有 just means 有. In modern Chinese I would write it ...


5

"明天你都六点起床不起床?" is not a valid sentence in Chinese. If we remove 都, and make it "明天你六点起床不起床?", it is valid but a little awkward. Because we usually don't say things like "起床不起床?", "吃饭不吃饭?", "睡觉不睡觉?", "学习不学习?" etc. when asking questions. The point here is that we normally don't repeat the whole word before and after 不 in questions, instead we simplify it. ...


4

In all these situations I would use one of these 这样不好 这样不太好 这样好象不好 short, simple and broadly usable. adds a feeling of "not optimal". adds some level of uncertainty to the statement.


4

Why need subject? It's a imperative. "有时间“ just modifies the sentence as a condition. Comparing with some English sentences: Well, I'm going. Call me later. Well, I'm going. Don't forget closing the door. You don't need subject as well. For you second question, would it be possible to say: 如果有时间 , 到我家去. It's rare to say like that. Firstly "如果” is ...


4

In general, we don't care if it is grid aligned or not. And even in fonts that are not fixed-width, the Chinese characters usually have the same width. To make it to look better, it is better to make the right boundary a straight line, not zigzaged. If you find it hard to achieve, then just leave it as it is. Some punctuation marks, such as commas (,), ...


4

I'm a native speaker, here is my opinion: 欢迎你来到中国! is a complete sentence, it emphasize that the opposite side already arrived in China.; 欢迎你到中国来! is an uncompleted sentence, the part of Purpose is omitted. 来 or 去 is an adverbial modifier, it's commonly following by a noun or phrase for purpose. e.g. 欢迎你到中国来访问! 欢迎你到中国来旅游! 欢迎你到中国来玩! Also, 欢迎你来中国! can be ...


3

Ivan did a good job answering in that, in this example, it's all context based... just as all languages are. It's kind of like: "Hey man, I'm bouncing. Stop by some time" Whereby you can guess they mean: "Hey man, I'm bouncing. You should stop by some time" You will find many more examples along your journey to learn Chinese where an expected subject is ...


3

To translate directly: "Can you wash your clothes at the hotel?" 你可以在宾馆洗你的衣服(clothes)吗? Not sure if it is really what you want. But if you are asking the hotel staff whether they help you wash your clothes, then it should be: "Do you provide laundry service?" 你有提供洗衣服务(service)吗? The basic order of a Chinese sentence is usually in the ...


3

There's also 嘛 and 吗. Practically, there is little difference between the two, aside from the pronunciation. 吗 is most used in questions where speaker is usually neutral about the question. 嘛, although not applicable in your given example, it can be used to question or affirm. I.e., used with to express emotional context (positive or negative given the ...


3

The other answers give some good examples, so I'll try to provide an answer from a grammatical perspective. 完 can be used as a resultative complement meaning "to finish doing something". You put it after a verb to mean that you finished doing that verb. 「吃完」 means "finish eating". 了 has many different uses, but the one that I first learned was as a past ...


3

The best way to translate the 和 in this sentence is using "how". The sentence roughly translates to "Spring festival is similar to how Westerners spend Christmas, this is a festival where the whole family gets together." However, this is more of a contextual translation. 和 should be closer to "with" but it doesn't make exact sense to say Spring festival is ...


3

This is really a big topic that can be expanded on multiple dimensions, but to the core of your question, Does Chinese songs have a natural word order? Not always, if 'natural' means grammatical and can be used in daily spoken language or formal non-poem writing. If I learn Chinese from new songs, do I risk learning unnatural expressions and word ...


3

I am a native speaker but not language specialist, thanks for @Earth Engine awared that. In my opinion (not from authoritative textbook), strictly speaking, B. "欢迎你到..." means you are not in the place... we welcome you to there; "欢迎你来到" means you are already there, we welcome you. However, except very formal situation or someone who is extremely ...


2

To answer the question: English phrase "I am [doing something] because [reason]" has Chines equivalent, which preserves the same sentence order, as: "之所以我现在正在做.. 是因为..." Though, I am not sure if 所以我在做.. 是因为 is wrong, the 之 in this sentence is not really optional, i.e. saying 之所以我在做.. 是因为 is much more natural than 所以我在做.. 是因为, at least to me. ...



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