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This is a good question. 字了一 should be understood as: (and his) 字 (is) 了一 Thousands years ago, many people in China have a special name besides their first name and last name though nowadays most of Chinese don't have one. And this special name is often described after '字'. For example: 刘备,字玄德. According to some reference in Chinese, 字 sometimes can ...


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字了一 means 表字:了一。 表字: Chinese style name; courtesy name (a name traditionally given to Chinese males at the age of 20 (also called 字)) check http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%A1%A8%E5%AD%97 http://zh.wikipedia.org/zh-mo/%E8%A1%A8%E5%AD%97


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這麼些 can be directly translated to this many/much, 那麼些 is that many/much, and like it is in English, it doesn't necessarily mean "a lot": A: How much pizza did you eat? B: This much. A: I can see why you are so slim. If you do want to say "many", you want to use 這麼多 or 那麼多. Back to the original sentence, of course they can be put to the ...


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Someone may guide you to a comprehensive source, but if you want to do prepositioning or left branching, all you need to care about is to make them appear in a logical sense. This basic sense is the same for most languages. You put time first, then the location A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.... You put more prominent attributes first ...


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Sentence as S There may not be such a thing. In English you might want to say That I came out of the closet surprised them all. While in Chinese you can have 我出柜惊了他们所有人。 Which is normally interpreted as I came out of the closet (and) surprised them all. Not quite the same. Sentence as O Plenty. 你知道我出柜了。 You know I've come out of the closet. ...



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