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This is one of the core conceptual mistakes that learners of Chinese make. Let me try to shed some light on it: 了 does NOT express past tense, it expresses change. Why not past tense?! Because as 倪阔乐 has also stated, (1) there are no tenses in Chinese. And because (2) 了 can express change in the past, present and future, too. Let's just examine ...


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Firstly, the second sentence is not complete, it's invalid. If you mean "I enjoyed board a plane", then you should say "我喜欢坐飞机", not "去". When you use "去", a destination should be described in your talking context. "我喜欢步行去巴黎" means "I like to go to Paris by walk", means when I go to Paris, I like to go there by walk. "我步行喜欢去巴黎" means "I like to walking ...


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"我认为" is good, it's equal to "I think", which means you deducted it from your knowledge. You can also use "据我所知" witch equals to "As I know". "我认为中国是世界第二大的国家", or "据我所知,中国是世界第二大的国家".


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what about 認為: http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000136182 for serious, formal one; with researches, proofs, etc..., you may consider 考證: http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000076978


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Yes. In fact, you can use any word as an exclamation, especially in speech. I'm not aware of any language where this is ungrammatical. Example: Q: What's your favourite Chinese word? A: 当然!


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As far as I know adding verbal modal particle 了 is enough for marking reality or actuality of the situation. No need in 其实 here cause it can be used in irrealis context too.(habit, wishing, ordering....) in your case 其实 is just a decoration. P.s. Try translating Your sentence without 了. That is: ,去年我去北京,太冷啊! P.s.s if you want to stress that "it is cold" ...


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It is true that a lot of words in an English conversation such as 'basically', 'well...', 'actually' don't have good one-to-one translation mappings to the Chinese language. 其实has a negating connotation to the context you are trying to convey. I am going to give it a shot and say, here 'actually' could be replaced by 'in fact', which then can be translated ...


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都 can mean either 'both', or 'all'.. so you could simply say, 都是吧 whether it was 2 or 10 reasons.


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To the best of my knowledge, breaking up sentences into separate lines is fine, but you should not do so in a way that breaks up linked characters (e.g. in your example, 变 and 得). For example, in the ending of a Hong Kong commercial about cervical cancer prevention, we see the text: 爱护自己 (take care of yourself) 及早检验 (and get tested early) (The ...


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In terms of grammar, Chinese also uses punctuation marks to delimit fragments and sentences, so a line break usually doesn't indicate a new sentence. The only hard rule is that most punctuation marks should not begin lines. Most word processing software should enforce this for you. After this it's a stylistic question. It's true in Chinese, just as it is in ...


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In Chinese, there is no word, or even grammatical principle expressing the meaning "both". Instead, we will say 我是去中国旅行和学习汉语的。 Because clearly you are going to do two things at the same time, actually "both" is redundant. In Chinese, thus, just stop confusing in the word "both". If you want to emphasize "both", like that in English, a good way, in my view,...


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Just reply 两者都是 in Chinese. or say 我去中国旅行同时学习汉语.


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In fact 一边。。。一边。。。 means doing two things at the same time, like 我一边学习一边听音乐 means I listen to the music while studying. Here, you can say 我去中国既旅行又学习汉语。 既。。又。。 is an appropriate phrase to express that.



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