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11

Actually, "好包了" does not mean "I'm full". You may see "...打好包了..." in the Google hits. It refers to "have made something into a package. If your friend say "这顿饭我包了". That means your friend will get the bill, and you don't pay the bill. You will see "7天包退" on some goods's package, that means "7 days to cancel purchase for non-faulty goods". And ...


6

The character 分 has two different readings. As fen1, it has a range of meanings. As fen4, it can mean a role or part played by a person, a more general part or portion of something, or a component. Fen4 can also be written 份, and dictionaries I consulted from both Taiwan and the mainland don’t seem to differ here. The Far East Chinese-English Dictionary, ...


6

醡醬麵 and 炸醬麵 炸醬麵 can work as it means "noodles with fried sauce" 醡醬麵 is "noodles with extracted sauce (e.g. extracting oil)" 炸 fried (火 fire radical + phonetic 乍 zhà) 醡 extract (酉 container + 窄 narrow; from 穴 hole and 乍) Archaic character for 榨 (tool for extraction process. 木 wood used to refer to tools in this case) 醬 sauce 麵 noodles Alternatively, ...


5

I think it is a terrible mistake that the website has made, because there is no occasion when qu is pronounced tsʰu in Mandarin. Since you can actually tell the difference between u and ü, things should be easier for you now. You can just memorise that after (pinyin) j, q, x, y, ü is always written as u, and if you see u after j, q, x, y, it's always ...


5

The pronunciations of finals do not change when used after different finals, with perhaps only one exception: 'i'. It has three variations: 'zi ci si', 'zhi chi shi ri', and all others. NOTE: Not many Chinese know the differences, but you can compare: English pinyin Lee li she shi (the two consonants are also different) see si The three ...


4

There is no expression "好包了". Actually, "好饱了" is also a strange spelling, since we usually use "我吃饱了" to express "I am full".


4

I think one of the reasons is the loss of tone and/or stress in the syllable. But see this table, "Chinese (Mandarin)/Pronunciation of Finals", it provides a good summary of the changes.


3

It is okay to say Macbook Air in between Chinese, or you can say 苹果的Air电脑 or 苹果的Air系列电脑 if you must. More info: It seems that mainland Chinese are adapting 电脑, but I want to point out both 電腦(traditional Chinese) and 计算机(simplified Chinese) means "computer". 電腦 is used everywhere while 计算机 is only for formal use in mainland China. (計算機/计算机 can mean ...


3

Sorry for my misunderstanding of your question. Actually, because 注音符号 is abandoned in the mainland(it still remains in the dictionary), and is mainly popular in Taiwan, so I am not familiar with that system. I searched 注音符号 on the Wikipedia, and I found the answer. ...


2

One of the easiest ways to hear the different pinyin sounds is to look on YouTube. The trickiest ones for me to learn were the different pronunciations of "i". Here are some videos that explain the differences: zhi, chi, shi, r sound a bit like English "sure". ji, qi, xi sound a bit like English "she". zi, ci, si sound a bit like the vowel at the end of ...


2

We call these words "异形词" in Chinese. Definition from Wikipedia: 异形词,是指在普通话书面语中并存并用的同音(指声母、韵母和声调完全相同)、同义(指理性意义、色彩意义和语法意义完全相同)而书写形式不同的词语。例如:“笔画”和“笔划”、“按语”和“案语”、“唯一”和“惟一”等等。实际的使用当中,除了书写的差异之外,它们还有使用频率的不同,但是一般不会造成误解。 中华人民共和国教育部和国家语言文字工作委员会2002年3月31日发布试行了《第一批异形词整理表》。 在繁体中文里面,异形词现象也是存在的。而汉字简化并没有完全消除这些现象,所以从繁体中文中继承也是异形词的主要来源之一。 Here's a link for 《第一批异形词整理表》: ...


2

"醡" is not only tradtional spelling but also simplified spelling. So does "炸". "炸" can be used in both tradtional chinese and simplified chinese. "炸酱面", "炸醬麵", "醡酱面" and "醡醬麵" are all right. However, "炸" is used in mainland China, and "醡" is used in Taiwan usually. It seems like that "apartment" is used in the USA and "flat" is used in the Uk. So the view ...


2

Huang has a great answer. Additional info is that in Taiwan when printing the bopomofo to the side of the character, the first tone "一" is usually not printed at all. It is considered as the "default" tone. The other three and the neutral tone are printed out.


1

You are right, it means 'choose', and the difference of pronunciation, (as a Taiwanese I think it) is due to the song. (The elongation of that note.) So both suán-ti̍k or sng-tia are fine.


1

I'm Chinese , I think it make no sense to spell this voice in Chinese Characters. And even if you give the spelling , I don't think I can understand what it is. Beside, don't use Chinese Characters to spell any other language's voice unless there is a usage of oral speaking in Chinese.Just write what it is and explain it in Chinese in (). Like this: ...


1

弗里顿 Fereydoon From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Fereydoon, Fereydoun or Ferydoon (Persian: فریدون) may refer to: Ferydoon Zandi_百度百科 姓名:弗里顿·赞迪


1

This is a translation error of wikipedia. If you switch the entry to chinese, it will give you 炸醬麵. https://zh.wikipedia.org/zh-hk/炸醬麵 醡 and 炸 do mean differently as stated by other answers. And I think the two words have been mixed up when they did the simplification on chinese.


1

not sure about Taiwan, but in Hong Kong, most of the time people just use the word 炸 instead of 醡. I don't think it's anything related to simplified/traditional wording coversion It's simply because 炸 pronounce similar to 醡, and 炸 have way less strokes than 醡. I mean, when you work as a waiter in any kind of food place, you really don't have that kind of ...


1

'U' is pronounced 'Ü' with the initials J, Q, X and the pseudo-initial 'Y'. Otherwise it is always pronounced 'U'. Something that might help one remember it, is that J, Q and X are also pronounced with the same tongue-position but with slightly varying flow of air. So J, Q and X are basically one pronunciation. I like to think that the inventors of pinyin ...


1

There are many accents, but I will try to describe the pronunciation. I don't know phonetic characters, but if you go by an American accent, 去 sounds a lot like "chew" if one were to say it fast, adding more of a "ts" sound at the beginning, with a downward inflection, and emphasize the "ee" sound. Just listen to people talk, and imitate them.


1

For Chinese writing, we don't say how to "spell" the character. We say how to "write" the character.


1

Just some additional information related to how to input the horizontal version: In Unicode, the code point for "BOPOMOFO LETTER I" (0x3127) takes the vertical form. There's not horizontal version in the 'Bopomofo' section in Unicode. But a further search showed me that "BOPOMOFO LETTER I" is rendered either horizontal or vertical in different fonts. In ...



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