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9

I could think of some reasons why the stroke order is important. In modern times, especially in the digital times, there should be a standard of the stroke order, so that when people input characters with "stroke order" method, it's useful to program the input method consistently. We have some general rules of the stroke order, such as "from up to down, ...


8

The best place to start is with the Wikipedia entry on stroke order. It lists these guidelines, along with more detail and some nice animated examples: Write from top to bottom, and left to right. Horizontal before vertical Diagonals right-to-left before diagonals left-to-right Center before outside in vertically symmetrical characters ...


7

The stroke order is important, yes. The main reason that explains why the stroke order is so important is that the it helps to write the character correctly, with better speed and in an easier way. Pick a character, and try to write it with the official stroke order, and then with another one: you'll find out that in the second case it will be sometimes ...


6

No fonts do, just sites with pictures or animations. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:-bw.png#file Instructions: Past the address in your browser bar, then write a character between "File:" and "-bw", like this "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:你-bw.png#file". It will show you the character's stroke order, not animated, but very clear. ...


6

The single most important reason for stroke order being adhered to is probably the handwriting problem: Imagine, if you will, someone writing an english text in cursive, consistently crossing the t's and dotting the i's before writing the stems; and making it part of the flow of the line. Now imagine that same scenario, only with each character having ...


6

As @deutschZuid mentioned in his comment, the component in 乘 that you mention is technically not its radical. The "radical" refers specifically to which component the character is classified under in dictionaries, which in this case is 丿. But anyway, to answer your question, the 丬 component in 妆 and 装 and the component that looks like that in 乘 have ...


5

About this question, you can consult Guobao Wang's summary: 1.只有横折钩类与撇相遇:先写横折钩,例刀、力、万 、方、乃、杨。 2.其他横折类与撇相遇:都先写撇,例如及(横折折撇 ),几(横折弯),九(横斜钩)、匕(竖折弯)。 translate into English: 1.Only when uppermost and rightmost lines with a left hook cross with right-to-left diagonals(ノ): uppermost and rightmost lines with a left hook is written first. For example: ...


4

My teacher says there are two main reasons for stroke order: Depending on the stroke order, the character will look one way or another. This is mainly a matter of style from times when writing was made exclusively with paint brushes. Now in the era of computers, stroke order is definitely not important for writing. As it's been said, for systems that ...


4

I believe for 印 the 1st one is correct. 氏 is written in this order: . The first 3 strokes are exactly same as those first 3 stroks in 印. Consider the following characters: 卯, 留,齊(齐). We finish this part first, , then add the next strokes, which are 丿, 丶, and ㇏ respectively. But if you make the font of 印 like this, the 2nd order in your question is correct. ...


2

The order of strokes affects the "evolution" of the character when writing in high speed. In high speed the character shape shifts and one can often recognize the character even after extreme deformation because the general flow of the character is there. But if the stroke orders are changed, the deformation doesn't conform to the expected shape and it may ...


2

As far as I know, there isn't any Chinese font with stroke order. But Japanese has: http://www.nihilist.org.uk, https://sites.google.com/site/nihilistorguk/. And I have to remind you, even one character is the same in Chinese and Japanese, its stroke order may be different.


1

According to the Wikipedia article on stroke order there is disagreement as you have already mentioned. Wikipedia sites the following text: 现代汉语通用字笔顺规范 (PRC-China modern Chinese commonly used characters standard stroke orders), Beijing: 语文出版社 (Language and Literature Press), 1997, pp. 453, ISBN 7801262018, retrieved 2010-09-02 (Authoritative) As the ...


1

You can reference 《现代汉语通用字笔顺规范》 published by the Ministry of Education of PRC, which includes the stroke order of over 7000 daily used simplified Chinese characters. If you want to find some traditional Chinese stroke order resources, check this



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