Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

It is very common and, in my personal experience, has similar offensiveness as the f word in English. It can be offensive and quite rude: e.g. in a business negotiation, when the deal is finally broken and one side says: 你他妈的给我滚出去 = "Get your fucking ass out of my office" It may be used in irony among close friends which is not offensive then: E.g. ...


11

The only correct answer is "TA MA DE". This is the equivalent version of "F**K" in Chinese. I never hear people pronounce as "Di". Thinking it in other way, it will be too soft and feminine if it's pronounced as "Di". It supposed to be strong and speak with hatred.


10

There is a restaurant in the Ximending district of Taipei, Taiwan, with a giant banner exclaiming; 真他媽的好吃 =~ "Truly f**ing tasty" I equate it to the British "bloody". "That's bloody tasty". Offensive in a formal context, but a commonly accepted expletive.


9

May I suggest checking out the ChinaSmack glossary? They have a huge array of colorful language, and there is sure to be something that meets your needs in terms of a curse word there. Just to add, I always hear Chinese girls saying 讨厌 (taoyan) when they are annoyed or frustrated, but it's not exactly the most masculine of statements. 烦 (fan) also seems to ...


6

For cursing: "操" is pretty similar to "damn" or "sh*t" in such situation of cursing. Also similar as they should not be used in very formal situations. However, the meaning of "操" is same as the f word in its verb form. "操" should be quite acceptable (or at least ok) in informal scenarios. "靠" has very very close meaning as "操" in this situation. ...


6

Oh, get you a Taiwanese news (at 0:18 by the anchor, 0:58 by a student and 1:24, 1:56 by himself) about that, where it's pronounced as "niáng pào". I can tell that we use this word in mainland China too, here is the proof. It refers to a sissy (a boy that other boys dislike because he prefers doing things that girls enjoy).


5

The 的 here is acting as the possessive, so this means: His mother's... From the context that you have shown, 他妈的 should be pronounced: Ta Ma De


5

In every formal environment, is not appropriate like fxxking & shxt in english. Unofficially, in oral, people also use 他妈的 equivalent to VERY. Examples: 天气真他妈的热(It's really fxxking hot today) when used isolated, just means damn it and the same degree of offensiveness.


4

I believe that 他妈的 would be a general curse like "f--k!" (or "damn"), but not an insult , whereas 你妈的 would be a personal insult like "f--k you" or "you mother(truck)er." Think of 他, in this context, as a generic form of "you", much like "on" in French. In other words, "one's mother" or "someone's mother" (although could also specifically be "his mother" - ...


4

The 的 has two kinds of pronunciation, De and Di. Different pronunciation is used for different cases. In 他妈的, the 的 is pronounced like: De, which makes the whole thing: Ta Ma De. I also never hear people say Ta Ma Di. In case you didn't know, 他妈的 or 他麻痹(Ta Ma Bi) means Mother F**ker in English. Hope this helps!


4

"他媽的" is a brief form of "他媽的屄(bi)", where 屄(bi) is a noun, meaning = woman's sex organ (may be offensive for somebody) So the pronunciation of 的 here should be /de/ in neutral tone.


4

Should be De, although 的 can also be pronounced as Di, but it has a different usage, such as 的確, 目的.


3

"靠" is more like it, in modern oral Chinese. While "操" is literally the F-word since it's a homonym of "肏" which means the F-word. If you are looking for a more speakable word, 倒霉, 该死 or 见鬼 would be more fit.


3

De and Di and both accurate. Di is more colloquial.


3

I think maybe your friend is referring to "ma de", which literally means "your mother" but colloquially means "f**k". Actually, there's a slow, drawn out way to say this, which is "maaaa de", which means "f**k", "s**t"... but honestly, without the "de" (which sounds like "duh"), no one will misinterpret your meaning (or lack of meaning) by simply saying ...


2

I know some people might think 干 is not-so-mild, but I tend to hear it a lot in the sense of Damn, all the way over there? That's a long way to go 干!那么远的地方?走过去要很久 or That chick is hot, damn! 那个正妹好辣,干!


2

In my region, Shandong Province, it's pronounced as tE ma de


2

I think it has the exactly same meaning as 'fucking', not more offensive or less. It should only be used between people about the same age and who meet each other very often.


2

De or Di would both work depending on the regions of China.


2

I think 他妈的 is perfectly normal and not offensive just liking fucking. It is used to emphasize something but people may regard you rude and uneducated if you say this in some formal situation.


2

A story tells of an ethnic minority student who simply wanted to borrow a pen from a female comrade. Ethnic minorites in China are often as tone deaf as Westerners, and when the guy wanted to borrow a pen (借你的笔 / jie4 ni3 de bi3), it became 借你的屄 (jie4 ni3 de bi1), and the female student got all red in her face pondering the proposal of lending her cunt to ...


2

日 is a swear word getting popular and popular in china these days.. By the hatred for the Japanese.. And it's stroke like the circle with a dot in the center.. Same meaning as sticking up your middle finger.. It is a very ”powerful” word that doesn't need any help of other words to lead it's meaning. Like "ri ni ma"for integrated phrase. The same applies ...


1

A friend of mine used to go to the post office and borrow a pen (bi3) from one of the women who work there. However, she kept asking if the woman had a bi1 (in the first tone), which means a cu*t until a friend noticed what she was saying and told her what it meant. And they say shabi, which is pretty offensive, it would translate as stupid c*nt.


1

干(gan4) is another character that could be accidentally said as a swear word in Chinese. 干(gan4) could mean do as in "gan4 shen2 me" or tree bark as in "shu4 gan4". However, 干(gan4) is also the equivalent for "f**k" in Chinese. In our experience, our students usually accidentally say it when slowly pronouncing the compounds such as "gan4 shen2 me" and ...


1

Since new swearing tag appears thick and fast... 他妈的is already sounds traditional... It could come out of a gentleman's mouth,like the essay wrote by the great writer and thinker Lu Xun: Those who live in China will often have occasion to hear the swear: tamade (他妈的) and others like it. I think the geographical distribution of this phrase is probably as ...


1

It's very offensive and strange to talk to strangers or in a formal situation. It also depends on users' level of social class I think. I never use it to describe something good or when I miss somebody. Speaking of that, I never use f..k in English to talk to my friends either. I guess it depends on the people's personality. I could imagine the gangsters ...


1

Note that I'm Taiwanese and I use Traditional Chinese characters. The swear words I type below (sorry!) may look different in Simplified Chinese. Also, China has way more swear words than us that I don't understand. ...for swear words, do they use the same character they use for the word or is it written differently? As many people have written above, ...


1

The answer is pao4 (the most common pronunciation) 如法炮製、炮烙 are pao2 炮羊肉 is bao1 When pronouced pào, it usually means artillery. 鞭炮: firecracker 炮兵、炮手: artilleryman páo means burn or roast 如法炮製 is an idiom, means follow suit. 炮烙 is a ancient torture (stamp on someone's body with burning iron) And bāo means stir-fry or drying 炮羊肉: stir-fry lamb 炮乾: ...


1

It is a highly offensive expression comparable in meaning and offensiveness to "s-o-b" in English. It refers to coming out of one's mother (one's birth), and not for the better. It means, she's a "b, because you're an "s-o-b."



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible