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14

Not sure if listening skill to tones in Chinese songs has its own implication, I get the impression that songs are generally harder than daily conversations for a non-native language. To answer the first part of your question: native speaker can not tell the lyrics all the time. One particularly interesting case is the songs by Jay Chou, who is one of the ...


12

There is a technique I started to use and actually, I've seen it also in other dictionaries, so maybe I wasn't that original... But anyway, the answer is colors! When you're studying new Hanzi or vocabulary, just color each character according to the tone... It's very helpful to remember the tones, because after a while, you visualize the tones in your ...


11

No. In songs, most tones disappear. The syllables are sung along the melody of music. We only tell the tone because we can catch what the whole word or sentence is. In songs, usually the melody should be written to convey the tones of syllables (or syllables chosen to much the melody). Mismatch of melody and lyrics can result in misunderstandings. However, ...


11

Yes, for example these characters are taken from a Chinese grammar textbook: There are obviously others, but as you can see, it's possible to guess the pronunciation. In other cases, according to the radicals, you can understand if they refer to a certain "topic", for example, the third one in that list is the radical for "water", the last one is the ...


9

一 is pronounced in the first tone when it stands alone. It is pronounced in the fourth tone when it precedes a first, second, or third tone. However, it is pronounced in the second tone when it precedes a fourth tone. 不 is a bit similar: It is also pronounced in the fourth tone when it precedes a first, second, or third tone. However, it is pronounced in the ...


9

The correct one should be bu2 zai4 hu. Unless there is an emphasis for "NOT" CARE, a 4th tone bu4 is then used, but I rarely hear that as a native speaker. Let's review the tone change rule for 不, A second tone bu2 is used only when the tone of next character is a 4th tone, i.e. bu2 shi4. A forth tone bu4 is used if the tone of next character is 1st, 2nd ...


7

As your linked table indicates, the Middle Chinese 陰上 tone generally corresponds to Cantonese tone 2 and Mandarin tone 3, so it is indeed curious that you see both words having tone 4 in Mandarin, which typically corresponds to Middle Chinese 去 tones or 陽上 tones where the syllable onset is an obstruent (全濁聲母). Looking up the characters in the Kangxi ...


7

Looking at 我很好 this falls into the "When there are three 3rd tones in a row" The 我 is one syllable so it falls into this part: If the first word is one syllable, and the second word is two syllables, the first syllable becomes half-3rd tone (˨˩), the second syllable becomes 2nd tone, and the last syllable stays 3rd tone For this 我也很好 this is ...


7

All the 5 tones in Mandarin exist in English already, but not used in the same way. 1st tone: I am a STUUUUU-dent. When you read this sentence in the normal way, the syllable STUUUUU carries the first tone. 2nd tone: Are you a stu-DENT? When we ask a yes-no question in English, we need to raise the last syllable of the sentence. The syllable of DENT? ...


7

Dictionaries, in general, will not incorporate tone sandhi rules into their pronunciations (of which Mandarin has quite a few) Wikipedia says the following: Mandarin Chinese Mandarin features several sandhi tone rules. When there are two 3rd tones in a row, the first one becomes 2nd tone, and the second one becomes a half-3rd tone. E.g. 你好 (nǐ + hǎo = ní ...


6

Here is a nice short overview on Mandarin tone sandhis: http://web.mit.edu/jinzhang/www/pinyin/tones/index.html If you want to read into the details I have found the following a very good source (from the father of another romanization): "Yuen Ren Chao: A Grammar of Spoken Chinese. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1968, ISBN 0-520-00219-9."


6

Complete rule of tones change is not a simple subject which can be understood just b a list. But there is a simple one I think might be suitable for you. http://www.trinity.edu/sfield/chin1501/ToneChange.html Plus, if you are a foreigner who want learn Chinese without academic purpose, I think it's enough since many Chinese cannot use tones change complete ...


6

The rule that applies to sentences also applies to names, that is for a sentence of sequential 3rd tone characters, (Optionally) Split it to phrases by functional groups. For each group, every other character is read as 2nd tone while keeping the last character 3rd tone. 2.1. If a group has even number of characters, the tones become 2,3,...,2,3,2,3. ...


5

These tone changes, known as tone sandhi, are not indicated according to Hanyu Pinyin rules: 11.1 Only the original tones are indicated; tone sandhi is not indicated. This is why your Google search for "yìnián" would not necessarily yield more results, because it's still supposed to be written as "yīnián" even when it's pronounced "yìnián". EDIT: ...


5

Like others have told you, you might be confused a little bit. First of all, while languages have words made of syllables, Chinese has characters where each character is a syllable. These syllables can be written using the Latin alphabet with some systems, Pinyin being the most common one. Syllables can have 5 different tones: high, rising, fall-rising, ...


5

For people who tell me they "don't get" the tones, or who can say them but quickly forget them, I usually explain them as listed below. I imagine you're well past this point, but the visuals might help remembering them: 1st tone: Sing it -- ♪ 2nd tone: Like a yes/no question -- ? 3rd tone: Low, creaky. -- Still can't think of a good symbol >_< 4th tone: ...


5

There is a very interesting phenomenon in Chinese, called 语音变调(tone sandhi). Here are the rules. (Note: all the rules apply only characters in the same word/phrase) Tone Rule #1: 3-3 to 2-3 When there are 2 third tones in a row in the same word/phrase, the first one becomes second tone. This rule is always followed automatically, even though it will not ...


5

Here's an example of this sort of phenomenon: Syllables that begin with unaspirated stops b, d, g, or affricates j, zh, z, and end in a nasal n or ng, as a rule don’t have second-tone forms. Here's a more extensive explanation of how this came about


4

Personally I think the IPA given in the Wikipedia page for Pinyin is organized well and the symbols don't change like other pages I've seen, i.e. the browser changes to other symbols ruining the IPA scheme. Like it has been said, the IPA transcription might change in some words endings when you transcribe real speech, so you must be aware of that and know ...


4

Here is a list for all the pinyin and there correspondence IPA: http://ling.cass.cn/yuyin/english/sampac/sampac.htm You'll need a special font to show the IPA on the page correctly, which is downloadable from the page. This page is in the web site of the Institute of Linguistics, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. NOTE: same letter in different ...


4

too many characters can be classified into "形声字", which consists of two parts, one (the radical) indicates the topic the character is referred to and the another indicates the possible pronunciation. xiaohouzi79 shows a good example. But remember, there are some commonly used characters that don't follow this, when you can't read a character, dictionary is ...


4

In short: the standard pronunciation is the English pronunciation. There's no Chinese standard way to pronounce English letter (how they are pronounced when they are used as pinyin should not be counted here, I think). Tone does not exist for English letters, as they are English, not Chinese. English intonation should take effect(in English, when 'DVD' is ...


4

There are three things going on here: 多 pronounced with a 2nd tone If you observe carefully, you may notice that all examples of 多 with 2nd tone occur when the following character is 4th tone. I believe this is an erroneous extension of the same rule for the characters "一" (yī) and "不" (bù), which both become 2nd tone when the following character is 4th ...


4

This rule is not so strict, as in my specification, we never pronounce 甲苯(methylbenzene),乙苯(ethylbenzene), 苯甲酸(acetic acid) in that fashion, though no ambiguity is produced, it is just weird and funny to pronounce so. However, for familiar words like 奶奶,姐姐, the other extreme is present, which is they are always pronounced as 21-5. (In my opinion, this is an ...


4

Simply put, there are no tone sandhi rules for when words change from their citation tone to the neutral tone. The appearance of the neutral tone is morphologically motivated, not phonologically motivated — in other words, the tone change is not governed by the sounds of the surrounding words. Because the definition of sandhi is ...


3

What source do you call authoritative? Any Chinese grammar book and handbook series should explain this at some point. In Wikipedia it is also mentioned: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_sandhi#Mandarin_Chinese Given that there are these tone sandhi, there are two ways to deal with these. You can either write the original tones, or you can write the ...


3

相 [Xiang1] surname Xiang [xiang1] each other, one another, mutually [xiang4] appearance, portrait, picture You should look into getting a Chinese reader. http://www.loqu8.com has one for free that is really good. It uses the CC-CEDICT dictionary which is really good. If you would like more concrete examples, they're all going to be in Chinese, but there ...


3

I agree with fefe and I would like to show my experience on how to read these acronyms. A native Chinese speaker will read it as he reads these letters in English, however, There is no standard way to pronunce these acronyms. Different people would read them differently, as every one has his own preference (also effected by his dialects,I believe) to read ...


3

I don't believe there is a standard for it. But from news and gameshows it is quite common to pronounce the first few letters of the alphabet (ABCD..) in first tone as part of a Chinese sentence. For other letters like HXZ that do not go well in first tone, the fourth tone is used. Like I said I don't believe this to be a standard, but a result of people ...


3

I've been developing and using the TOP (Tonally Orthographic Pinyin) system since 1995. There's a free online converter available at http://www.chinesepronto.com/triple/flashfix.php. The TOP system is redundantly marked for tones: with colors, with capital and small letters, and with the standard Hanyu Pinyin tone marks. The color system is simple and ...



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