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Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


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T1 = T4 < T2 < T3, which means that T2 and T3 are more complex tones. https://naccl.osu.edu/sites/naccl.osu.edu/files/NACCL-23_1_06.pdf


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From a practical learner's point of view, treating the checked "tones" as shorter, closed syllables that carry the same tone as as tones 1, 3, 6 (and 2 in changed tone) would be enough. In modern Cantonese of the Pearl River Delta, there appears to be little to no difference in pitch between the non-checked and checked. In Taishanese, one of the checked ...


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The classic sentence for multiple tone 3s is “Old Li buys good wine.” 老 李 買 好 酒 In citation form they are all tone 3s, of course: lao3 Li3 mai3 hao3 jiu3 Which ones change to tone 2? It basically depends on how fast you are speaking. If you are speaking slowly and carefully, only the tones that are within a phrase will ...


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My subjective view is that the first and third tones are quite long, and the fourth is short and abrupt. The paper by Chang cited in the other answer seems to confirm this: [An] intrinsic durational difference among four Mandarin tones has been noted as early as in Lin (1965), with T3 being the longest, and T4 being the shortest. An acoustic study by ...


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This a well-known issue to do with the rendering of contour tones in certain computer fonts. The Wikipedia article for tone letter states that: The contour-tone letters are composed as sequences In the "Modifier Tone Letters" block in the Unicode standard (A700-A71F in Unicode 7.0), only the level tone letters are provided. Hence any non-level tone ...


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In the "我很好" (wo hen hao), you would definitely go with "3-2-3". "wo3-hen2-hao3". Say "很好" first, and then add "我" in the front, without changing the tone.


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In real world speeches and conversations you may want to adjust the duration of any specific character, either to make yourself comfortable or to show your stress. However, the duration of tones is "undefined" in Chinese pronunciation system. As a native speaker, I have never been told that tones have exact or relative durations. This doesn't conflict with ...



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