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3

I've been also curious about this and I think this could easily be a research topic. Chinese people often happen to understand me even when my tones are flat, and I highlight that they understand me a lot less when my tones are wrong. Of course this depends a lot on the context, and on the sentence. In a known context and with basic (high frequency) words ...


2

As a native speaker, this is what I do in such a case: If my listener is not Chinese, does not know Chinese, or I am speaking in an event that doesn't require my listener(s) to know Chinese - I pronounce it in whatever tone I feel comfortable. Sometimes I mimic the listeners' pronunciation. (However, if I can guess the tones, I may tend to guess, because ...


2

it's zhōng, according to 國語辭典: http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000120693 in cantonese, it jung1 (sydney lay scheme) http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=中 sound file: http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/sound/zung1.Mp3 方者﹒才也﹒始也; roughly "only then" have fun :)


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First tone, when you use it to mean 'middle', 'middle of', 'centre'. When it is pronounced in the fourth tone, it typically means "got it". For example, when you check your lottery ticket and you've won. I double checked with this Source and it looks like I got it. Here are more specifics: 拼音: zhong (first tone) 注音: ㄓㄨㄥ center; middle in; inside; ...


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Hearing English speaking folks pronounce Beijing as ”Beizhing” makes this an unrealistic ambition (is it really that hard pronouncing jing quite naturally as in jingle bells?). You simply can't expect people to correctly pronounce names or stuff in another language. Certainly, in some European countries, there are ambitions to come as close as possible: ...



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