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10

一 in 一线 has two kinds of tones, and two corresponding meanings: yi1 xian4 (1st tone), means front line / 1st line, such as 一线城市 (first-tier city), 亲临一线, 一线队. yi2 xian4 (2nd tone), means a gleam of / a ray of, such as 一线光明, 一线生机. Basically, before the word with 4th tone, 一 should be pronounced as the 2nd tone (“一”的音变), such as 一样, 一辈子. But if it is used ...


7

一 is First tone here, meaning first class, the best. Other examples: 一等奖, first prize; 第一, first.


5

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


5

From a practical learner's point of view, treating the checked "tones" as shorter, closed syllables that carry the same tone as as tones 1, 3, 6 (and 2 in changed tone) would be enough. In modern Cantonese of the Pearl River Delta, there appears to be little to no difference in pitch between the non-checked and checked. In Taishanese, one of the checked ...


5

I suggest that you shouldn't do this. Chinese characters cannot be faithfully constructed backwards from a tone+syllable combination -- the mapping only goes one way (and even then, sometimes characters have multiple pronunciations). For example, as you know, 馬 is generally pronounced ma3. However, ma3 could also reference the characters 碼 (number), or 獁 ...


4

Standard Cantonese's 陽平 tone is definitely pronounced with a falling contour (21). Modern Cantonese Phonology by Robert S. Bauer, p. 144 appears to acknowledge, but did not find, a low-level contour for this tone though: For the Mid-Low Falling tone both Yuan (1983:181) and Zhan (1985:168) also recognized a variant low level contour of ˩11 in addition to ...


3

"Neutral" tone is not really a tone, and shouldn't be used for comparison with lexical tones. Jerry Norman (Chinese, p. 148) calls syllables with neutral tone 'weakly stressed syllables' to avoid just this misundertanding: The term 'neutral tone' implies that weakly stressed syllables are a kind of 'fifth tone'. From both a synchronic and a diachronic ...


3

The neutral tone doesn't have a fixed value; it's phonetic realization is largely determined by the preceding tone: Also called fifth tone or zeroth tone (in Chinese 轻声 [輕聲] qīng shēng, literal meaning: "light tone"), neutral tone is sometimes thought of as a lack of tone. It is associated with weak syllables, and thus usually comes at the end of a word ...


3

Arguably 东干语 is an example, which has only three tones. The first and the second one in mandarin is merged. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungan_language


3

I am not sure, but probably the Shanghai dialect (上海话), which is said to have only two tones or rather pitch accents: low and high.


3

When you are talking about 成都话, the first tone (阴平) follows the following rules: 1) The regular case for the first tone is 45. When you are reading a single character, you should use 45. 2) When the character is part of a phrase or a sentence, it may change. Specifically, when a first tone character A is preceded by another first tone character B, A is ...


3

The classic sentence for multiple tone 3s is “Old Li buys good wine.” 老 李 買 好 酒 In citation form they are all tone 3s, of course: lao3 Li3 mai3 hao3 jiu3 Which ones change to tone 2? It basically depends on how fast you are speaking. If you are speaking slowly and carefully, only the tones that are within a phrase will ...


3

T1 = T4 < T2 < T3, which means that T2 and T3 are more complex tones. https://naccl.osu.edu/sites/naccl.osu.edu/files/NACCL-23_1_06.pdf


2

My subjective view is that the first and third tones are quite long, and the fourth is short and abrupt. The paper by Chang cited in the other answer seems to confirm this: [An] intrinsic durational difference among four Mandarin tones has been noted as early as in Lin (1965), with T3 being the longest, and T4 being the shortest. An acoustic study by ...


2

粵語的聲調變化分成連續變調與變音 (morpho-phonemic change)。主要發生在複詞或疊字詞,一般來讀低音域(主要是低降調)的第二音節會轉為高昇調。 1) 連續變調:不發生語意或文法上的改變: 家人稱呼,如:爸爸(baa4 baa1)、媽媽(maa4 maa1)、弟弟(dai4 dai2)、太太(taai3 taai2) 2) 變音:會發生語意或文法上的改變: i) AAB型疊字詞,如:立立亂(laap6 laap2 lyun6,雜亂的) ii)名詞作為容器量詞使用時保持原來的聲調,如:一盒朱古力(jat1 hap3 zyu1 gu1 lik1,一盒巧克力)vs 呢個盒(ni1 go3 hap2,這個盒子) It seems like what you ...


2

You kind of hit a snag without knowing Chinese characters (hanzi), because there are so many homophones in chinese, especially without tones. In your example of 吗 and 马, they both have different tones which you don't type at all, and actually typing ma for me gives about 15 different characters to choose from. In fact, even words like 终止 and 中止 sound ...


2

一线城市 is the first tone Rule number 1: If "一" is for "order", then it is the first tone. However, 一线天, is the second tone. Rule number 2: If "一" is for "quantity", then it is the second tone. Again, in oral Chinese, sometimes rules above are not always right, e.g. 一辈子, usually ppl use second tone for that, because that can give this word a special ...


1

I don't know how to answer your question, maybe the suggestions below will help you: In my opinion, it seems that 这位姑娘 with niang2 is serious, but 小姑娘 with niang5 is rather relaxed. At least, I prefer to use niang5 in my daily life (but I think the word 姑娘 is less used than 女生, because the word 姑娘 sometimes makes people embarrassed). I think the 边 in 东边 is ...


1

See this question about the pronunciation of "一". To be simple, in 一线城市, 一 is used as an ordinal number, so it is the first tone. Here 一 means first. In general, 一 is used as a cardinal number, its prononciation varies in function of the context.


1

Adding to @Claw's answer, Standard Cantonese used to have (and I heard in some dialects still has) TWO falling tones (and thus a total of 7 tones). This is still acknowledged in modern-ish dictionaries like the one published by CIHK. The former tone #2 was a high-mid falling tone, akeen to Hakka's fourth tone.


1

It's not standard Jyutping, but CantoDict uses the asterisk to indicate a changed tone. In your example, waa6*2, the standard citation tone for 话 is 6, but when pronounced in the word, 广东话, its tone changes to a rising tone, so it is denoted with a *2. A note at the footer of the definition page indicates this convention: Also, CantoDict uses a unique ...


1

This is why you have to learn the actual characters first, and read and write in the actual characters. Pinyin helps indicate the pronunciation, nothing more. There is no tool that can help you distinguish between hundreds of characters equally represented by one string of Roman letters.


1

At least on Windows 7 you can configure the New Phonetic IME to not require tones, although you will still need to press the space bar to separate characters. Go to Control Panel - Region and Language - Keyboards and Languages - Change Keyboards Choose the New Phonetic IME and click Properties On the Advanced tab, switch the "Toneless" option to ON


1

In the "我很好" (wo hen hao), you would definitely go with "3-2-3". "wo3-hen2-hao3". Say "很好" first, and then add "我" in the front, without changing the tone.


1

In real world speeches and conversations you may want to adjust the duration of any specific character, either to make yourself comfortable or to show your stress. However, the duration of tones is "undefined" in Chinese pronunciation system. As a native speaker, I have never been told that tones have exact or relative durations. This doesn't conflict with ...



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