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11

Dictionaries, in general, will not incorporate tone sandhi rules into their pronunciations (of which Mandarin has quite a few) Wikipedia says the following: Mandarin Chinese Mandarin features several sandhi tone rules. When there are two 3rd tones in a row, the first one becomes 2nd tone, and the second one becomes a half-3rd tone. E.g. 你好 ...


11

The correct one should be bu2 zai4 hu. Unless there is an emphasis for "NOT" CARE, a 4th tone bu4 is then used, but I rarely hear that as a native speaker. Let's review the tone change rule for 不, A second tone bu2 is used only when the tone of next character is a 4th tone, i.e. bu2 shi4. A forth tone bu4 is used if the tone of next character is 1st, 2nd ...


9

Linguists divide pre-modern Chinese broadly into two periods: Old Chinese and Middle Chinese. I wanted to preface my answer by noting that Bernhard Karlgren used the term "Ancient Chinese" to refer specifically to Middle Chinese, and it appears that your questions seem to be referring to Middle Chinese as well, though I will be making a note about Old ...


7

All the 5 tones in Mandarin exist in English already, but not used in the same way. 1st tone: I am a STUUUUU-dent. When you read this sentence in the normal way, the syllable STUUUUU carries the first tone. 2nd tone: Are you a stu-DENT? When we ask a yes-no question in English, we need to raise the last syllable of the sentence. The syllable of DENT? ...


4

As an addendum, two brief comments regarding how tones are reflected in the languages that borrowed a lot of vocabulary from Chinese: According to the Wikipedia page on ‘Sino-Xenic pronunciations’, “[m]ost Middle Chinese tones were preserved in the tones of Middle Korean, but these have since been lost in all but a few dialects.” The source cited seems ...


4

Simply put, there are no tone sandhi rules for when words change from their citation tone to the neutral tone. The appearance of the neutral tone is morphologically motivated, not phonologically motivated — in other words, the tone change is not governed by the sounds of the surrounding words. Because the definition of sandhi is ...


4

Yes, you're right. The phenomenon of 豆腐 dòufu is the result of tone sandhi (连续变调 liánxù biàndiào). IME does not support tone sandhi, so you're unable to search for it as a neutral tone. The only accepted tone entry for 腐 is 3rd tone fǔ.


4

This rule is not so strict, as in my specification, we never pronounce 甲苯(methylbenzene),乙苯(ethylbenzene), 苯甲酸(acetic acid) in that fashion, though no ambiguity is produced, it is just weird and funny to pronounce so. However, for familiar words like 奶奶,姐姐, the other extreme is present, which is they are always pronounced as 21-5. (In my opinion, this is an ...


4

There are three things going on here: 多 pronounced with a 2nd tone If you observe carefully, you may notice that all examples of 多 with 2nd tone occur when the following character is 4th tone. I believe this is an erroneous extension of the same rule for the characters "一" (yī) and "不" (bù), which both become 2nd tone when the following character is 4th ...


3

I suggest you use an online dictionary similar to this site: http://www.mdbg.net/chindict/chindict.php?page=worddict&wdrst=0&wdqb=shishi The linked site above allows you to hear the pronunciation (click on the arrows), however I suggest you copy and paste two characters into Google translate which has the audio and it pronounces it as a set phrase ...


3

I think maybe your friend is referring to "ma de", which literally means "your mother" but colloquially means "f**k". Actually, there's a slow, drawn out way to say this, which is "maaaa de", which means "f**k", "s**t"... but honestly, without the "de" (which sounds like "duh"), no one will misinterpret your meaning (or lack of meaning) by simply saying ...


2

Wikipedia is your friend: Tones See also: Four tones The Qieyun classified characters in four parts according to their tone: even tone (píngshēng 平聲), rising tone (shǎngshēng 上聲), departing tone (qùshēng 去聲), and entering tone (rùshēng 入聲). The "entering tone", also known as a "checked tone", actually refers to syllables characterized by a final stop ...


2

Yale romanization analyzes Cantonese syllables in terms of an optional initial and an obligatory final (e.g., cheung = ch + eung). The tone mark is always placed over the first letter of the final (e.g., chèung). As you mentioned, h is used after the vowel (more accurately the syllable nucleus) in syllables to denote tones 4, 5, and 6 (e.g., chèuhng). While ...


2

A story tells of an ethnic minority student who simply wanted to borrow a pen from a female comrade. Ethnic minorites in China are often as tone deaf as Westerners, and when the guy wanted to borrow a pen (借你的笔 / jie4 ni3 de bi3), it became 借你的屄 (jie4 ni3 de bi1), and the female student got all red in her face pondering the proposal of lending her cunt to ...


2

Simple answer: Sinosplice Tones In Chinese Songs I’ve been asked a number of times: if Mandarin Chinese is a tonal language, what happens when you sing in Mandarin? Well, the answer is the melody takes over and the tones are ignored. Pretty simple. A graphic representation of tones spoken vs. sung in Mandarin [also from Sinosplice]: Sometimes, ...


2

日 is a swear word getting popular and popular in china these days.. By the hatred for the Japanese.. And it's stroke like the circle with a dot in the center.. Same meaning as sticking up your middle finger.. It is a very ”powerful” word that doesn't need any help of other words to lead it's meaning. Like "ri ni ma"for integrated phrase. The same applies ...


2

For purposes of "tonality," Chinese doesn't want to have two words with the fourth tone or third tone "back to back." When this happens, the first word in the series takes the second tone instead. The example of using two words with fourth tones such as 不在 is one where the two words together are pronounced bu2zai4, even though they are pronounced 不bu4 and ...


2

Here are some exmaples: shi jian 尸检 shi1 jian3 时间 shi2 jian1 实践 shi2 jian4 使剑 shi3 jian4 世间 shi4 jian1 事件 shi4 jian4 试建 shi4 jian4 shi shi 失实 shi1 shi2 失事 shi1 shi4 实施 shi2 shi1 时时 shi2 shi2 时事 shi2 shi4 实事 shi2 shi4 十世 shi2 shi4 史实 shi3 shi2 史事 shi3 shi4 誓师 shi4 shi1 事实 shi4 shi2 事事 shi4 shi4 逝世 shi4 shi4 yi yi 一亿 yi2 yi4 疑义 yi2 yi4 意义 yi4 hi4 异议 ...


2

I feel this is a pedagogical shortcoming. New words should be introduced using pairs of words with the same sound but different tones, for example {天、甜},{湯、糖},{上海、傷害}. This might help the learner make remembering tones a prioity in his efforts to learn the language. For example, in a lesson with 20 new vocabulary words, perhaps there should be two pairs of ...


2

In class, I can see that as a problem. I agree the best approach is the teacher asking them to repeat themselves again and again, particularly while doing reading. I could really feel the pressure so I knew I had to know exactly which tone it was, and then be definitive in what I said. There was a lot of 再說一次. However, once people are outside of class, I ...


1

Improve the pronunciation of the second tone and your problem with the identification/perception will automatically disappear. It’s neurolinguistic magic. The pronunciation can be improved with a good voice training, a skilled Mandarin teacher or with a tool which has been made for tone training and voice analysis: Zhoong Tone


1

The method that worked best for me was recording myself reading something and then comparing that with a native speaker. They actually sell "language learning" CD players/tape recorders that play a recording, and when you hit a button, record a few seconds of your speech, then play you and the last few seconds of the recording back. I used this system and ...


1

John Pasden, a linguist you may be familiar with if you use ChinesePod, has developed a system for learning tones called "Mandarin Chinese tone-pair drills." The program he developed costs money and is probably easier to use than anything else, but there is no reason why you could not simply practice all of the different tone combinations in pairs of two on ...


1

Depends on your method of memorizing characters. If you are using a story, it would be easy to append the tone somewhere in there. Even if you are not, I would recommend using this method, works well! Update: So far, I was largely ignoring tones when memorizing new words. Not a good idea, but it did help in giving me a good momentum. Now, I have switched ...


1

if you want to listen to separated 聲母(initial consonant) and 韻母(simple vowel), I would suggest this swf from here https://www.mdnkids.com/BoPoMo/BoPoMo.swf This material is made by 國語日報 from Taiwan. Just click those symbols (left 16 are vowels, right 21 are consonant) and you can listen to it. The tone of Taiwan Mandarin is a little bit different from that ...


1

Here's the ultimate one for you. 92-character poem by Zhao Yuanren (赵元任) 《施氏食狮史》 石室诗士施氏,嗜狮,誓食十狮。 氏时时适市视狮。 十时,适十狮适市。 是时,适施氏适市。 氏视是十狮,恃矢势,使是十狮逝世。 氏拾是十狮尸,适石室。 石室湿,氏使侍拭石室。 石室拭,氏始试食是十狮。 食时,始识是十狮尸,实十石狮尸。 试释是事。 « Shī Shì shí shī shǐ » Shíshì shīshì Shī Shì, shì shī, shì shí shí shī. Shì shíshí shì shì shì shī. Shí shí, shì shí shī shì shì. Shì shí, shì Shī Shì ...


1

A friend of mine used to go to the post office and borrow a pen (bi3) from one of the women who work there. However, she kept asking if the woman had a bi1 (in the first tone), which means a cu*t until a friend noticed what she was saying and told her what it meant. And they say shabi, which is pretty offensive, it would translate as stupid c*nt.


1

干(gan4) is another character that could be accidentally said as a swear word in Chinese. 干(gan4) could mean do as in "gan4 shen2 me" or tree bark as in "shu4 gan4". However, 干(gan4) is also the equivalent for "f**k" in Chinese. In our experience, our students usually accidentally say it when slowly pronouncing the compounds such as "gan4 shen2 me" and ...


1

There's an animation named "喜洋洋和灰太狼" might give you a little help. It is usually for Chinese children at 3-4 years old when they start to learn the Chinese. I am a chinese native speaker, if you have any other problem,I'm glad to help.


1

I am keen to share my tips with you - colour coding to master tones. What is the commonality between the below pairs of characters? (i) mother 妈 & horse 马; (ii) field 田 & sky 天; (iii) king 王 & net 网; (iv) mother 妈 & sky 天; (v) field 田 & king 王; (vi) horse 马 & net 网 Answer: The first three pairs of characters share the same ...



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