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5

I suggest that you shouldn't do this. Chinese characters cannot be faithfully constructed backwards from a tone+syllable combination -- the mapping only goes one way (and even then, sometimes characters have multiple pronunciations). For example, as you know, 馬 is generally pronounced ma3. However, ma3 could also reference the characters 碼 (number), or 獁 ...


5

From a practical learner's point of view, treating the checked "tones" as shorter, closed syllables that carry the same tone as as tones 1, 3, 6 (and 2 in changed tone) would be enough. In modern Cantonese of the Pearl River Delta, there appears to be little to no difference in pitch between the non-checked and checked. In Taishanese, one of the checked ...


4

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


3

The classic sentence for multiple tone 3s is “Old Li buys good wine.” 老 李 買 好 酒 In citation form they are all tone 3s, of course: lao3 Li3 mai3 hao3 jiu3 Which ones change to tone 2? It basically depends on how fast you are speaking. If you are speaking slowly and carefully, only the tones that are within a phrase will ...


3

T1 = T4 < T2 < T3, which means that T2 and T3 are more complex tones. https://naccl.osu.edu/sites/naccl.osu.edu/files/NACCL-23_1_06.pdf


3

A story tells of an ethnic minority student who simply wanted to borrow a pen from a female comrade. Ethnic minorites in China are often as tone deaf as Westerners, and when the guy wanted to borrow a pen (借你的笔 / jie4 ni3 de bi3), it became 借你的屄 (jie4 ni3 de bi1), and the female student got all red in her face pondering the proposal of lending her cunt to ...


3

There is no simple rule for dropping a final tone, so you would have to learn all those cases by route. Half of them end in 子 (zi), as a diminutive. The further north you go, the more common it is to drop tones. Nevertheless, there are many words that always end in a neutral tone in all variants of Mandarin. Consider 东西, which is pronounced dong1xi, ...


3

When you are talking about 成都话, the first tone (阴平) follows the following rules: 1) The regular case for the first tone is 45. When you are reading a single character, you should use 45. 2) When the character is part of a phrase or a sentence, it may change. Specifically, when a first tone character A is preceded by another first tone character B, A is ...


2

You kind of hit a snag without knowing Chinese characters (hanzi), because there are so many homophones in chinese, especially without tones. In your example of 吗 and 马, they both have different tones which you don't type at all, and actually typing ma for me gives about 15 different characters to choose from. In fact, even words like 终止 and 中止 sound ...


2

From Wiki(https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%9B%E5%B7%9D%E8%AF%9D#.E5.8F.98.E8.B0.83): 连读变调现象在四川话口语中十分常见,但各地略有差异,以成渝片为例,大致来说四川话中的变调可以分为4类。 一是重叠词中的变调,一般而言如果组成该重叠词的字声调为阳平或去声,则第二个字变调为阴平(例词:爸爸[pa2pa1]、婆婆[pʰo2pʰo1]、舅舅[tɕiəu4tɕiəu1]、帕帕[pʰa4pʰa1]);同时,如果组成该重叠词的字声调为上声,第二个字变调为阳平(例词:姐姐[tɕiai3tɕiai2]、板板[pan3pan2])。 ...


2

Yale romanization analyzes Cantonese syllables in terms of an optional initial and an obligatory final (e.g., cheung = ch + eung). The tone mark is always placed over the first letter of the final (e.g., chèung). As you mentioned, h is used after the vowel (more accurately the syllable nucleus) in syllables to denote tones 4, 5, and 6 (e.g., chèuhng). While ...


2

My subjective view is that the first and third tones are quite long, and the fourth is short and abrupt. The paper by Chang cited in the other answer seems to confirm this: [An] intrinsic durational difference among four Mandarin tones has been noted as early as in Lin (1965), with T3 being the longest, and T4 being the shortest. An acoustic study by ...


2

Simple answer: Sinosplice Tones In Chinese Songs I’ve been asked a number of times: if Mandarin Chinese is a tonal language, what happens when you sing in Mandarin? Well, the answer is the melody takes over and the tones are ignored. Pretty simple. A graphic representation of tones spoken vs. sung in Mandarin [also from Sinosplice]: Sometimes, ...


1

This is why you have to learn the actual characters first, and read and write in the actual characters. Pinyin helps indicate the pronunciation, nothing more. There is no tool that can help you distinguish between hundreds of characters equally represented by one string of Roman letters.


1

粵語的聲調變化分成連續變調與變音 (morpho-phonemic change)。主要發生在複詞或疊字詞,一般來讀低音域(主要是低降調)的第二音節會轉為高昇調。 1) 連續變調:不發生語意或文法上的改變: 家人稱呼,如:爸爸(baa4 baa1)、媽媽(maa4 maa1)、弟弟(dai4 dai2)、太太(taai3 taai2) 2) 變音:會發生語意或文法上的改變: i) AAB型疊字詞,如:立立亂(laap6 laap2 lyun6,雜亂的) ii)名詞作為容器量詞使用時保持原來的聲調,如:一盒朱古力(jat1 hap3 zyu1 gu1 lik1,一盒巧克力)vs 呢個盒(ni1 go3 hap2,這個盒子) It seems like what you ...


1

At least on Windows 7 you can configure the New Phonetic IME to not require tones, although you will still need to press the space bar to separate characters. Go to Control Panel - Region and Language - Keyboards and Languages - Change Keyboards Choose the New Phonetic IME and click Properties On the Advanced tab, switch the "Toneless" option to ON


1

In the "我很好" (wo hen hao), you would definitely go with "3-2-3". "wo3-hen2-hao3". Say "很好" first, and then add "我" in the front, without changing the tone.


1

In real world speeches and conversations you may want to adjust the duration of any specific character, either to make yourself comfortable or to show your stress. However, the duration of tones is "undefined" in Chinese pronunciation system. As a native speaker, I have never been told that tones have exact or relative durations. This doesn't conflict with ...


1

This a well-known issue to do with the rendering of contour tones in certain computer fonts. The Wikipedia article for tone letter states that: The contour-tone letters are composed as sequences In the "Modifier Tone Letters" block in the Unicode standard (A700-A71F in Unicode 7.0), only the level tone letters are provided. Hence any non-level tone ...


1

That's why it is hard writing Chinese lyrics .... rather hard for Mandarin songs (4 tones) .... and very hard for Cantonese songs (9 tones). And don't forget to maintain the rhyme. If the tone of a character do not match the tone of song, it is easy to be mistaken as another character. Experienced singers may tweak the tone slightly as the last remedy. ...



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