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3

There is data on this matter. http://www.zainea.com/f0_m%26f.pdf present data showing that English speakers who study Mandarin typically use more tonal range in Mandarin than in English but substantially less than native Mandarin speakers do. Hardly surprising. And it is known that musical training helps. ...


2

This is an interesting question, and it got me thinking for the last couple of days. Here's my two cents. Rather than try to match your pitches to some model recordings, have you tried matching them to your personal highs and lows when speaking English? Try to notice how high and low you can go in different language contexts. An example that comes to mind ...


2

I think it's true that Chinese speakers use a wider pitch range than English speakers, or at least a wider range than most American English speakers. I blame it on Clint Eastwood. Unfortunately it's pretty hard to change ingrained vocal habits. One way I've found to practice is to imagine some situation where the English intonation comes closer to ...


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同调 pronounces as: tóng diào, see reference. (1) [same tone]∶音调相同 (2) [person with same common purpose or taste]∶比喻志趣或主张相同的人


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I will pronounce it as 同tong2 調diao4 代dai4 數shu4.


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The difference would be the degree of correctness. Certain words must have no citation. Certain words must have. And certain words are in between. If you come to China, you will hear correct version and wrong version as well based on what province, what city you are. The reason is 1/ oral language is free style. 2/ dialect influence. Based on what you ...



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