Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

At the beginning, I want to say that I am a native speaker and love Chinese, but I am not on a research level. It is welcomed that anyone can make comments and supply more info to my answer. Introduction First, Wikipedia (see the link provided by Krazer) is good start to get some background knowledge why we have simplified characters. After the found of ...


9

Chinese characters and phonetics You say: Unlike English, Chinese is not a spelling language, which means there is no hint from the characters for pronunciation!!! Luckily for us, that's not true! Actually, by some estimates, almost 90% of characters have a phonetic component to them. To understand what that actually means, you have to know how ...


8

Most characters are composed of a phonetic and a semantic component. The phonetic component is a character with a similar pronunciation (...or at least the pronunciation was similar at the time the character was created). The semantic component (or signific) indicates the meaning, although usually very vaguely (again, meanings--like pronunciations--change ...


8

There are many simplified characters' radical has nothing to do with the character itself,the only reason for this is just simplify characters,i have some examples(found on the web): 1) Without the heart, how to love 2) Looking back the village, the man has already left 3) No morals, because it is none of my business 4) The leader has ...


7

I would like to use 动手动脚 for 'cop a feel', or 'paw someone'. 他一接近女人就忍不住动手动脚. He can't be near a woman without pawing her. 揩油 and 吃豆腐 are also good options for 'cop a feel'.


6

Source: 【葉】和【叶】在普通話中雖然讀音相差很遠,但在古音(【葉】的古音為ㄕㄜˋ,是春秋楚國時的一個地方。)和吳方言中讀音相近,所以清末民初時蘇州等地的群眾開始把茶葉、百葉的【葉】寫成【叶】。錢玄同在1922年出版的《國語月刊‧漢字改革號》上提到這種用法。後來,中國人民共和國發布的《簡化字總表》吸收了這一用法,將【葉】簡化為【叶】,但注明【叶韻】的【叶】仍讀ㄒㄧㄝˊ。(時學祥、趙伯平主編的《語林趣話》一書(四川辭書出版社2002年1月出版)第396-397頁) Although in Mandarin the pronunciation of "葉" and "叶" are very far, however the ancient pronunciation (葉 ancient ...


6

I can only provide a partial answer: Many of the characters used in the names of non-Han ethnic groups were originally derogatory. After the founding of the PRC, the government conceptualized New China as a 多民族国家, and they changed many of the characters that were perceived as derogatory. I don't know if this process started under the 国民党, as you suggest, ...


5

It is in simplified Chinese, you can see this on the bottom part of the page, The sentence in the red frame means: "Language: Simplified Chinese"


5

Just looking at the title you can tell it's simplified. Why? 耸 is the simplified version 聳. Although, technically possible, it's highly unlikely that a book with a simplified title would be "in" traditional.


5

Let me summarize the cases and try to answer your question (TC = Traditional Chinese character set, SC = Simplified Chinese character set). Some characters were never simplified. For example, 井 U+4E95 is in TC and in SC (and for that matter, most characters). In the Unihan database, codepoints like these have neither a kSimplifiedVariant nor a ...


5

To answer your question, we need to clearly understand how Traditional Chinese characters got simplified, which I bet 99.999999% of the whole Chinese population don't even know about. This is a very big topic that I am not able to discuss about it in detail. So I will give a much simplified explanation. Consider these 2 sets: Traditional Characters vs ...


5

吃豆腐 (Chī dòufu): You're right, "Eating someone's tofu" can be physical actions (copping a feel) or biting someone's style. But I think this is as close to what you're looking for in English. These also work: Description: 调情时抚摸 (Tiáoqíng shí fǔmō) Touching someone while flirting 耍流氓 (Shuǎ liú máng): Hoodlum. Or what someone may call someone who copped a ...


5

There're no such character set like Japanese katakana. kana is a kind of phonography, but in Chinese only select similarly pronounced Hanzi(汉字) to transliterate loanword. Such as 沙发(sofa). Of course there're some commonly used idiom for special English pronunciation.


4

The Mediawiki converter uses a combination of automatic information from the Unicode standard, SCIM tables, and other sources plus manual tweaks to build a set of translation tables. When going from Traditional to Simplified, some characters have been condensed into one. Translating back from Simplified to Traditional requires context that a computer is ...


4

I will explain this in another view point :-) And I think it's better to put my conclusion first: 恋爱的预感 or just 恋之预感 is a perfect translation in Chinese. Now, let's consider this interesting question: Why is it said to be untranslatable in English? Koi No Yokan (Japanese): Koi No Yokan is a truly beautiful concept. It can defined the sense can ...


4

No. It became a variant way earlier than that. There may well have been a document to that effect in 1995, but it would not have been anything new. It is well established that 劵 and 券 were two different seal scripts characters, as @HenryHO points out. However, according to Qing Dynasty linguist Tuan Yu-tsai's annotated version of Shuo-wen Chieh-Tzu: ...


4

I'm pretty sure this is not the answer you are looking for, but here it is anyway...


4

I found listening to music really helped when learning - artists from Taiwan and the south tend to sing more clearly in my opinion. perhaps you could start there. Also, it is worth noting that in English we have around 8000 unique syllables, whereas in (mandarin) Chinese there are only around 400 (multiply this by 4 for the tones).


3

Two quick points: These characters have differing ages. Some of them have etymology tracing back to the oracle bone script, others are newer. 船 doesn't mean a 'large boat', just a 'boat'. I'm not really interested in going through full analysis on all of these, but suffice it to say that this article lacks correctness on both age and meaning claims.


3

This is a HUGE topic, which I think is impossible to thoroughly cover in one answer here. As usual, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_chinese is a good start. As for mainland, the simplification efforts and processes are inherently tied to the geopolitical history of the turmoils and revolutions in the first half of the 20th century and PRC, as ...


3

Simplified Chinese is used throughout mainland China, though pretty much everyone can read the Traditional also. Traditional Chinese tends to still be used in places like Malaysia, Singapore, etc. If you're marketing to mainland China then you probably want Simplified. Alternatively, do both.


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

Yes, there are preferred characters used in transliteration. But in Chinese the case is a little bit complicated than in Japanese. In Japanese, Katakana is part of the phonetic system of the language (although in written, those characters can be used with Kenji). In Chinese the phonetic system and the writing system are completely separated except in rare ...


3

老公 is more for casual conversation. e.g. 這是我老公 先生 can be used in a more formal situation. e.g. 這是我先生 In a even more formal situation, you can use 外子. e.g. 這是外子


3

Don't connect Chinese sounds to English sounds (or any other language, for that matter). It will only hinder your pronunciation. For example: A lot of learners want to connect 'xi' with the English 'she' - but first the Chinese 'x' is represented by the IPA letter ɕ where as the English 'sh' is represented by IPA ʃ - although it might be considered a ...


2

A possible answer which accounts for the fact that the video was made in Hong Kong: The cangjie (倉頡) code (the input method prevalent in Hong Kong) for 八佰 is HO OMA, and the code for 八百 is HO MA. A simple duplicated character would account for the error.


2

This is not actually an answer, more a guess. It is possible that they simply used 百 in line with the Japanese, and used 佰 according to their own custom (Hong Kong), and forgot to harmonise the two. Nothing mysterious, just a case of less than careful editing. A lot of Chinese might not even notice that there is any inconsistency.


2

It's for security. Upper-case of Chinese numbers prevent the number on financial forms from being modified. o一二三四五六七八九十百千 vs 零壹貳參肆伍陸柒捌玖拾佰仟 For example, you can easily make 一 become 二 or 十, but you cant make 壹 become 貳. Independent meanings of each character: 1. 壹: Consistent 2. 貳: Another 3. 參: Join (參加) 4. 肆: Presumptuous (放肆) 5. 伍: Associate with ...


2

Your question is totally wrong on itself! “犭”(反犬旁/犬部) is a radical of Chinese Characters (Han-Zi,汉字) which is only for forming/making up some single Chinese Characters. In the creating era aka ancient times, people used “犭”(a radical, the variant of 犬 i.e. dogs) to make some Characters which is with some relation to beast such as ...


2

I can think of the following reasons why you might encounter them (in order of appropriateness): Proper names, especially family names whose bearers want to maintain a tradition Linguistic text about the other kind of character Simplified handwriting in Taiwanese or Japanese Careless copy-and-pasting from 2 sources Do you have any specific case they ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible