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9

Chinese characters and phonetics You say: Unlike English, Chinese is not a spelling language, which means there is no hint from the characters for pronunciation!!! Luckily for us, that's not true! Actually, by some estimates, almost 90% of characters have a phonetic component to them. To understand what that actually means, you have to know how ...


8

Most characters are composed of a phonetic and a semantic component. The phonetic component is a character with a similar pronunciation (...or at least the pronunciation was similar at the time the character was created). The semantic component (or signific) indicates the meaning, although usually very vaguely (again, meanings--like pronunciations--change ...


5

To answer your question, we need to clearly understand how Traditional Chinese characters got simplified, which I bet 99.999999% of the whole Chinese population don't even know about. This is a very big topic that I am not able to discuss about it in detail. So I will give a much simplified explanation. Consider these 2 sets: Traditional Characters vs ...


5

Let me summarize the cases and try to answer your question (TC = Traditional Chinese character set, SC = Simplified Chinese character set). Some characters were never simplified. For example, 井 U+4E95 is in TC and in SC (and for that matter, most characters). In the Unihan database, codepoints like these have neither a kSimplifiedVariant nor a ...


5

吃豆腐 (Chī dòufu): You're right, "Eating someone's tofu" can be physical actions (copping a feel) or biting someone's style. But I think this is as close to what you're looking for in English. These also work: Description: 调情时抚摸 (Tiáoqíng shí fǔmō) Touching someone while flirting 耍流氓 (Shuǎ liú máng): Hoodlum. Or what someone may call someone who copped a ...


4

I will explain this in another view point :-) And I think it's better to put my conclusion first: 恋爱的预感 or just 恋之预感 is a perfect translation in Chinese. Now, let's consider this interesting question: Why is it said to be untranslatable in English? Koi No Yokan (Japanese): Koi No Yokan is a truly beautiful concept. It can defined the sense can ...


4

There're no such character set like Japanese katakana. kana is a kind of phonography, but in Chinese only select similarly pronounced Hanzi(汉字) to transliterate loanword. Such as 沙发(sofa). Of course there're some commonly used idiom for special English pronunciation.


3

Simplified Chinese is used throughout mainland China, though pretty much everyone can read the Traditional also. Traditional Chinese tends to still be used in places like Malaysia, Singapore, etc. If you're marketing to mainland China then you probably want Simplified. Alternatively, do both.


3

Two quick points: These characters have differing ages. Some of them have etymology tracing back to the oracle bone script, others are newer. 船 doesn't mean a 'large boat', just a 'boat'. I'm not really interested in going through full analysis on all of these, but suffice it to say that this article lacks correctness on both age and meaning claims.


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

Yes, there are preferred characters used in transliteration. But in Chinese the case is a little bit complicated than in Japanese. In Japanese, Katakana is part of the phonetic system of the language (although in written, those characters can be used with Kenji). In Chinese the phonetic system and the writing system are completely separated except in rare ...


2

At a high level, the answer is yes, reading Chinese and an alphabetic writing system stimulates brain parts differently. For instance, in http://www.pitt.edu/~perfetti/PDF/Reading%20in%202%20writing%20systems.pdf, it says that Not only did results show more bilateral activation for Chinese in occipital and fusiform regions, they showed more activation ...


2

I'm so luck as a Chinese native speaker, that means I can skill that easily. even as a native speaker, I also can't write down to some Characters. in fact, We usually use a small part of these characters. more even, with PCs and Phones development, in the information period, I seldom have chance to write down these characters. so, don't worry, Just remember ...


2

First off, this is not well written Chinese since it could lead to different interpretations. One: 除非,你堅持(認為)躲在潮濕的甲殼裡更快樂。 Unless, you insist that hiding in a moist carapace is happier. Two: 除非,你堅持躲在潮濕的甲殼裡更(讓你)快樂。 Unless, keeping your self hidden in a moist carapace (makes) you happier. Although the essential meaning is similar. There ...


2

I can think of the following reasons why you might encounter them (in order of appropriateness): Proper names, especially family names whose bearers want to maintain a tradition Linguistic text about the other kind of character Simplified handwriting in Taiwanese or Japanese Careless copy-and-pasting from 2 sources Do you have any specific case they ...


2

Consider traditional and simplified characters as two sets with a mapping between them. I'll refer to to simplified as S and traditional as T. Let's call the mapping M, and we'll say (s,t) ∈ M if there's a mapping from s ∈ S to t ∈ T. So, for example, we have 为 ∈ S 為 ∈ T (为,為) ∈ M One obvious question: Are S and T disjoint? No, they are not. For example, ...


2

Here's one way to do it which I figured out starting from some tips thanks to user2619 in the comments: Right click on the keyboard/IME icon in the system tray. Select "Settings" from the popup menu. The "Text Services and Input Languages" dialog will appear. Use the "General" tab. Under "Installed services" click on "Add...". Find the section "Chinese ...


1

not an app but here is a good resource: http://eword.ntpc.edu.tw/phrase.htm i admire you're willingness to learn traditional characters. we call these 生字簿 (unknown character booklet) in taiwanese elementary schools, so it helps if you know 注音 (zhuyin, aka ㄅㄆㄇㄈ bopomofo), and the pages flow from right to left vertically for stupid political reasons so be ...


1

吗 is a simplified Chinese character. You can tell from the short horizontal line where traditional would have four dots or legs. 嗎 is the traditional Chinese character equivalent. So if you really need 吗 you should install Simplified instead of or as well as Traditional Chinese. Traditional is used in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao, but most people in ...


1

Doesn't look like they reached Australia at all. They have reached Indonesia and not further South from there. From the map, it looks like the area between Indonesia an Antarctic was off limits due to heavy storm in the area. From the look of above picture (from bottom middle of the original map), the following are translations to the left: First ...


1

Many of the names have Japanese katakana so if you (learn to) read katakana, that will help you. E.g., in Europe, Italy 意大利亞 has イタリア (i-ta-ri-a), and in the Pacific, Solomon Islands 沙蠟門島 has サラモん (sa-ra-mon). Some katakana and Chinese don't match though, like Madagascar, which katana is マダカスカ (ma-da-ka-su-ka) but the Chinese is 仙勞冷祖島 (with a Chinese ...


1

Simplified characters are used in mainland China, but in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau, traditional characters are much more likely to be used. In Hong Kong at least (possibly Taiwan and Macau as well), simplified characters are pretty rare in usage, though most people will be able to read them anyway.


1

I don't think there is an exact counterpart for this phrase in Chinese. A few similar ones come to my mind: Describe 爱情 (love) or 缘分 (chemistry) with 命中注定 (fated), e.g. 命中注定的爱情 (predestined love), 命中注定的缘分 (preordained love luck). 走桃花运 or 命犯桃花 (blessed by peach blossom) means someone is in a lucky streak for love affairs. 真命天子/真命天女 (Heaven ordained ...



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