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I'm not sure how well it's implemented but you can check this out: 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字为台湾闽南语书写系统的汉字建议用字表,实施单位为中华民国教育部。 简介 台湾闽南语推荐用字于2009年9月中发布完700个字,并发布于教育部国语推行委员会(国语会)1的网站,免费供一般社会人士与学生等下载运用。 台湾官方以4年时间整理的用字,第一批闽南语推荐用字于2007年5月30日颁布,共有300字2, 2008年5月1日公布第2批100字3, ...


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I think is a slang in Taiwan 乾掉了 mean something is turning into boring(usually use after someone say a not funny joke) or the situation that people don't know what to say or react to it ex1: You just meet someone new to you after greeting, you don't know what to say to him, and so does he this embarrassed situation can be said "乾掉了" ex2: you are ...


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乾 and 幹 are both the traditional Chinese characters and can translated to a same simplified Chinese character 干. 幹掉了 is a slang means to kill or get rid of it. 乾掉了 just means something is vaporised or dehydrate.


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Do you remember where you heard about it? When people are drinking, they cheer, and they often say "bottom up" which is 干gān掉了 or 我干gān了 你随意 or something is drying, 苹果时间放长了就给干gān掉了 If you refers 干gàn掉了, it may mean some food have been eaten up, ex 我干掉了一盘菜, or something have been get rid of,ex 昨晚我们组又干掉了一个项目 Let me know what do you think !


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Maybe it is "干掉了"? It could means literally to eliminate / get rid of / to killed. i.e. (from some webpage): 我们的早餐,馒头太好吃了,已经干掉了 We have 'elimiated' (as in eaten) the steamed bun in our breakfast because it is too good


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For your purpose, instead of learning from a huge list of word pairs, you can use OpenCC. It allows you to convert between simplified and traditional Chinese. One big advantage of learning with this tool is that you can also learn different word-choices among the Chinese-speaking communities, e.g. Taiwan, Hong Kong, Mainland China.


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Yes, we always do that in email.


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Chinese is not an official language of Malaysia, but there are many Chinese-education schools and they use simplified Chinese exclusively. All newspapers and official documents also use only simplified Chinese. I think the change from traditional to simplified Chinese happened in the 80s.


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Hate to be pedantic, but Hongkong and Macau are not countries, but administrative regions within China. Furthermore, Taiwan’s status is a bit blurred because of the one China principle. As for your question, Chinese is not official language in Malaysia, Philippines, and Indonesia, so the issue boils down to actual usage, which is mixed and differs by ...



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