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20

At the beginning, I want to say that I am a native speaker and love Chinese, but I am not on a research level. It is welcomed that anyone can make comments and supply more info to my answer. Introduction First, Wikipedia (see the link provided by Krazer) is good start to get some background knowledge why we have simplified characters. After the found of ...


15

How much faster is it really to write simplified, given similar skill levels? Basically, writing simplified characters (SC) can be faster than traditional characters (TC). SC comes into stage primarily because of its handy characteristics. Some people really want to boost up the writing speed, among other personal reasons, and there's no such awesome ...


13

There are plenty actually, mostly due to the merger of multiple traditional characters into one simplified character. For example, the simplified character 后 maps to both traditional 后 (meaning 'queen') and 後 (meaning 'after' or 'behind'). Many of these mergers are listed in this Wikipedia article.


10

These are 2 different fonts for the same character. There are many website to check that, see this post for an overview. For example on chineseetymology.org and chinese-characters.org you can see that the simplified and traditional characters are identical (the former website explicitely writes: no simplification). Having said this. Although they are ...


7

Apart from simplified characters that merge two traditional characters into one, as already pointed out (and there are quite a few of these -- 後 and 后 merged into 后 is one example, 裏, 里 and 裡 merged into 里 is another, 鵰 and 雕 merged as 雕 is another), I couldn't offhand think of any cases where a simplified character has the same form as a completely ...


6

Source: 【葉】和【叶】在普通話中雖然讀音相差很遠,但在古音(【葉】的古音為ㄕㄜˋ,是春秋楚國時的一個地方。)和吳方言中讀音相近,所以清末民初時蘇州等地的群眾開始把茶葉、百葉的【葉】寫成【叶】。錢玄同在1922年出版的《國語月刊‧漢字改革號》上提到這種用法。後來,中國人民共和國發布的《簡化字總表》吸收了這一用法,將【葉】簡化為【叶】,但注明【叶韻】的【叶】仍讀ㄒㄧㄝˊ。(時學祥、趙伯平主編的《語林趣話》一書(四川辭書出版社2002年1月出版)第396-397頁) Although in Mandarin the pronunciation of "葉" and "叶" are very far, however the ancient pronunciation (葉 ancient ...


6

Bathrobe wrote (in a very thorough answer): "I can't offhand think of any cases where a simplified character has the same form as a >completely different traditional character." Two examples: 葉 > 叶 (Mandarin ye4; leaf); 聼 > 听 (ting1; to listen). 叶 and 听 are xie2 (to make something sound good/euphonous) and yin1 (as an adjective to describe ...


6

This is a difficult questions, since most people are quite religious about this topic. For some reason they prefer one over the other and say this one is the best one to learn first. Learning Chinese characters takes a huge effort and most need many years for that, however once you know one set learning the other one is relatively easy. Wiki says that ...


6

Historically they were the same character. Later the meanings split, 製 is usually the verb meaning to make, and 制 the noun meaning the system, or more abstract things. Uniform should be 制服, because it means the clothing following certain rules/system. 製服 could be literally interpreted as clothing-making. Regarding the meaning of overpower, it must be 制服.


5

醡醬麵 and 炸醬麵 炸醬麵 can work as it means "noodles with fried sauce" 醡醬麵 is "noodles with extracted sauce (e.g. extracting oil)" 炸 fried (火 fire radical + phonetic 乍 zhà) 醡 extract (酉 container + 窄 narrow; from 穴 hole and 乍) Archaic character for 榨 (tool for extraction process. 木 wood used to refer to tools in this case) 醬 sauce 麵 noodles Alternatively, ...


5

To answer your question, we need to clearly understand how Traditional Chinese characters got simplified, which I bet 99.999999% of the whole Chinese population don't even know about. This is a very big topic that I am not able to discuss about it in detail. So I will give a much simplified explanation. Consider these 2 sets: Traditional Characters vs ...


4

As the previous answers said, some traditional characters were merged into one simplified character. From a mathematical view, you could say the set of traditional characters and the set of simplified characters have an intersection. Also, you should not write Chinese in a mixed version, either simplified or traditional. Example 后来,王后发现她的头发变白了。 ...


4

In Hong Kong, students write traditional Chinese in schools. So, you can imagine that Hong Kongers usually write traditional Chinese in their handwritings. However ... Some people do write simplified Chinese almost exclusively in their handwritings, because they are immigrants from China. Some people do occasionally write simplified Chinese in their ...


3

Simplified Chinese is used throughout mainland China, though pretty much everyone can read the Traditional also. Traditional Chinese tends to still be used in places like Malaysia, Singapore, etc. If you're marketing to mainland China then you probably want Simplified. Alternatively, do both.


3

They can understand and will occasionally use simplified Chinese 1、台湾老的文化人都认识简体字。过去,台湾像大陆一样流行简体字。只是在中华人民共和国政府宣布实行简化字方案后,台湾当局才不许公共场合出现简体字,以表示不承认共党政府。但是,老人手写字依然有用简体字。我曾在回答关于“煎体字”问体中附一张照片,是1958年蒋介石写给郝伯村的信,信中就有几十个与我们完全一样的简体字。 2、书法爱好者认识简体字。简体字大量是行书、草书规范化。经常看古人书帖自然会认识简体字。 ...


3

The mediawiki converter uses a combination of automatic information from the Unicode standard, SCIM tables, and other sources plus manual tweaks to build a set of translation tables. When going from Traditional to Simplified, some characters have been condensed into one. Translating back from Simplified to Traditional requires context that a computer is ...


3

More people can read simplified than traditional, by a significant margin. There are roughly 1.3 billion people mainland China where simplified has been the standard since the 50s and 60s. Taiwan and Hong Kong, the three places traditional is the standard, total about 32 million between them (23 million in the Taiwan/ROC, 7 million in Hong Kong, 2 million in ...


2

I can think of the following reasons why you might encounter them (in order of appropriateness): Proper names, especially family names whose bearers want to maintain a tradition Linguistic text about the other kind of character Simplified handwriting in Taiwanese or Japanese Careless copy-and-pasting from 2 sources Do you have any specific case they ...


2

Consider traditional and simplified characters as two sets with a mapping between them. I'll refer to to simplified as S and traditional as T. Let's call the mapping M, and we'll say (s,t) ∈ M if there's a mapping from s ∈ S to t ∈ T. So, for example, we have 为 ∈ S 為 ∈ T (为,為) ∈ M One obvious question: Are S and T disjoint? No, they are not. For example, ...


2

Oh. As Taiwanese I am in full support of the traditional Chinese. Simplified Chinese looks like garbage-- Each Chinese character has its origins, and if you can learn systematically the extra strokes are not intimidating at all. The simplified system cut out many characters such that their meaning is not directly related to the character, just the phonetic, ...


2

In my opinion, which type of language you want to learn depends on where you want to go and where the people you contact are from. As Question Overflow mentioned above, traditional Chinese is used mainly in Taiwan, Hong Kong and other southeast countries. While in the mainland, incomputable publications and resources are used in simplified Chinese. Here is ...


2

It's true to state that "traditional chinese characters are more similar to Japanese Kanji than simplified chinese." In more example, you are going to find Japanese Kanji and traditional chinese characters are identical due to the fact that Japanese adopted Chinese Characters much earlier. Chinese character simplification only started in 1956 (quite ...


2

While most Kanji maintain the same meaning from their Chinese Hanzi counterparts, some Kanji have been given different meanings after the post-world war 2 simplification of Kanji More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji#Local_developments_and_divergences_from_Chinese


2

Simply depends on region. Put it this way: you use British English when you write resumes in Great Britain (and related regions/countries) and American English in the US. Nothing more than that. As you would not mix British and American English in an English resume, you would neither do so in a Chinese resume. The places that use traditional Chinese are: ...


1

People in Hong Kong and Taiwan use Traditional Chinese officially, both in Handwriting and Documents, not just because it's aesthetically more beautiful, but also because Traditional Chinese retains the personality and original shape of words compared to the simplified version. Taiwan especially uses Traditional Chinese as an opposition to Mainland China's ...


1

"醡" is not only tradtional spelling but also simplified spelling. So does "炸". "炸" can be used in both tradtional chinese and simplified chinese. "炸酱面", "炸醬麵", "醡酱面" and "醡醬麵" are all right. However, "炸" is used in mainland China, and "醡" is used in Taiwan usually. It seems like that "apartment" is used in the USA and "flat" is used in the Uk. So the view ...


1

Another useful tool for translating between Simplified to Traditional Chinese would be "cjklib". It has a Python API as well as a command-line interface cjknife. https://code.google.com/p/cjklib/wiki/Screenshots https://pypi.python.org/pypi/cjklib/


1

You might be interested in the opencc project. Besides trad-to-simp and simp-to-trad conversion, it can also convert different common word usage in different areas. For example, 「程式」 to 「程序」. And it also deals with the small difference between Simplified and Traditional Chinese you've mentioned in your question.


1

Simplified characters are used in mainland China, but in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau, traditional characters are much more likely to be used. In Hong Kong at least (possibly Taiwan and Macau as well), simplified characters are pretty rare in usage, though most people will be able to read them anyway.


1

Most Chinese can read the both. The reason is that only a small portion of Hanzi are different between traditional and simplified Chinese. (in other words, only a small portion is simplified from traditional version to simplified version.) Most Hanzi are the same. In mainland Chinese, you still can see traditional hanzi everywhere like plaques, posters, ...



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