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Chinese is not an official language of Malaysia, but there are many Chinese-education schools and they use simplified Chinese exclusively. All newspapers and official documents also use only simplified Chinese. I think the change from traditional to simplified Chinese happened in the 80s.


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Hate to be pedantic, but Hongkong and Macau are not countries, but administrative regions within China. Furthermore, Taiwan’s status is a bit blurred because of the one China principle. As for your question, Chinese is not official language in Malaysia, Philippines, and Indonesia, so the issue boils down to actual usage, which is mixed and differs by ...


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迹 is not a simplification of 蹟. 迹 is a simplification of 跡, though. 蹟 is a variant character of both. It can be used in either script, as one pleases.


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I had the impression that both 折 / 摺 mean "to fold", but 折 means "to fold only once", while 摺 only means "to fold only more then once". i.e. one-fold vs multi-fold. (In both verbal and noun context) I don't think that they are simplified/traditional variants to each other -- but I have less knowledge in this part.


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According to the dictionary in my phone, 折 have two meanings. One is pronounced Zhe2, which means to break or fold something, this is same as 摺. The another one is pronounced she2 means having been broken, which is not the same as 摺. And there is a note saying that when there might be confusion use 摺 according to the simplified Chinese character chart even ...


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In Cantonese sense, 折 and 摺 are completely different words with different pronunciation. 折 (tsit8) means "split" and "break" while 摺 (tsip8 or tsap8) means "fold". They are not interchangeable. In the evolution of Mandarin they converge to sound zhé finally, and people get confused.


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折 is not a simplified character. 摺 just happens to be a rarer character that means the same thing, namely to fold (v), or folder (n). 折 is here much more versatile, and has additional connotations, such as break, lose, die, act, and so on. Here we have words such as 打摺 (fold), which is obviously not the same as 打折 (make a discount).



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