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11

I'm not sure where you could get an accurate count for how many there are. Considering that loanwords have been coming into Chinese for thousands of years, it definitely won't be a trivial task. There is certainly quite a few, however, not all of which is current/widespread/universal. I'll list some here, and edit more in if I think of any later: Angel: ...


9

That 三明治 came from transcribing the English word Sandwich into Chinese. That is to say, it is meant to approximate the pronunciation of the English word. You aren't meant to interpret the individual characters literally. As Stan points out, it is sometimes transcribed as 三文治 as well. Historically it has also been written as 三味治, but that's pretty much ...


8

The proper translation is performance art, because that's what the Chinese name 行为艺术 was coined for. Although the literal meaning of the Chinese name is not quite the same as that of the English name, they refer to the same thing, and therefore should be taken as each others translation: as in fact, they are. For evidence I'll cite the English and Chinese ...


7

Yes, there is: 废话 Example: A: You know what, a banana without the skin is more tasteful! B: 废话。 废话 is not a good word for kids to imitate, though. And it is rarely used between strangers or to your parents, as it may be impolite/offensive.


6

This depends on the method used to generate the sound. The actual "cracking" is not generally mentioned when speaking about this phenomena in Chinese. Instead, the act that you perform to get the sound is the focus of the phrase. For example, "cracking your knuckles" would become something like "squeezing your fingers", which is "捏手指", 捏 being "to pinch". ...


4

A problem I think you're going to run into: mafia groups usually have their own terminology that normal people don't know - and normally wouldn't be used outside of the group. Anyhow I found this on Wikipedia: Triad structure and I found this comment online that should help you out a lot - I'm assuming your Chinese is good enough to understand: ...


4

This is Chinese (and it's written in Simplified Chinese). "苹果" means "apple"; and "帝国" means "Empire". The whole phrase could be translated as "The Apple Empire" or "The Empire of Apple" into English.


4

Looks like the character for laughter in Chinese 笑'xiao'


4

我认为,我觉得,依我看,在我看来,依我之见,etc. In your condition both are okay. But in daily life I would say 我觉得 since it's more common and informal. 窃以为 is an ancient-feel formal word for that , so is 恕我愚见.


3

Adding to the previous list: Bowling: 保龄球 bao ling qiu 滾木球 Buffet: 蒲飞 pu fei 自助餐 Calorie: 卡路里 ka lu li 热量单位 Cartoon: 卡通 ka tong 漫画 Motor: 摩托 mo tuo 电动机 Sundae: 新低 xin di 水果奶油,冰淇淋 T-Shirt: T-血 T-xue 短袖汗衫, 短袖圆领衫 Toast: 多士,吐司 duo shi, tu si 烤面包 Vitamin: 维他命 wei ta ming 维生素


3

Far as I know, names such as 意饺 really don't refer to any specifics - instead, they are simply names given to foreign foods that resemble their "chinese counterparts." 饺子 refers to boiled dumplings (note, dumplings alone refers to, ambiguously, 粽子, 饺子, and 包子) - where a stuffing is wrapped in a layer of dough and boiled in water. Thus, 意大利 饺子 really refers ...


3

来自XYZ的问候! {0}您的验证码是 {1}。 这是您的 XYZ 账户链接, 点击此链接确认你的邮箱。 No problem remaining


3

I am talking about mainland. We call the leader/master 大哥, which means BIG BROTHER. not 哥, not 哥哥, not 大哥哥 For the outside people, we usually call those subordinates 小哥, you see 小哥 usually charge the shops on the street for "protection". Not 小哥哥 What the boss call subordinates, I do not know, Im not Big Brother.


3

稀罕 and 稀奇 are not the same thing. The verb 稀罕 means "to value"; using it as a negative therefore express disdain. The translation given of "I don't care about your money" is quite spot on. I assume you aren't asking for a "better" translation for this. The adjective 稀奇 means "rare", "unusual". It is not grammatically proper in Standard Chinese to use 稀奇 as ...


3

The proper translation is geologic hazards. It is used to refer to any disaster that result from either human land use or natural geological processes. Consequently, it is quite a large and, yes, unspecific, group of disasters. In China, generally speaking it refers to one of the following: Rockfalls Mudslides Landslides Ground subsidences Sinkholes Earth ...


2

咄 (duo1) should be the one. In some places of China people also pronounce it as (qü4) to comment on an action perceived as foolish or stupid, or a statement perceived as obvious.


2

I think there is no equivalent to "duh". Chinese does have "hmm" and "errr".


2

In the region where I was born (Xicheng, Beijing), we don't use 稀奇 as a verb (I have never heard any). Using 稀罕 as a verb sounds also "weird" to me but I do understand the meaning and I have heard some people saying this (but none from my family or my friends around). I think it is more like a local expression from somewhere else. A proper translation of 稀罕 ...


2

恍然大悟 <= you understood something finally 善始善终 <= you have a good start and a good end of a non-trivial task 松了口气 <= relief 释然 <= .... um .... also relief .... but written in a literal manner 如释重负 <= get rid of some heavy responsibilities 大彻大悟 <= understood some great big ideas, changing your attitude/thought/life in a good way ...


2

If you wanna reply with blame: 废话 If you don't wanna break your relationship with the other one,you can use the word: 呵呵 It gives hint to the other one that "It's a stupid question but I choose to stay as stupid as you."


2

I think 相关词 is too vague in this context Grammatically, I would say "double negative" Another similar term is 能 vs 不能不


2

老大 is for boss. 小弟 is for subordinate.


2

use 废话,那还用说,很明显啊,很显然啊,when speaking to your buddy. 嗯,是啊,确实,when speaking to your college or someone in a formal situation.


2

The terms would be radically different for China or Hong Kong audience. (But are you sure that you could obtain the approval "to stay" in the China market with triad-related contents?)


2

During the May Fourth Movement, many terms were "imported" from Japan to enrich the Chinese vocabulary for translation of Western idea. Not to mention that China, Hong Kong and Taiwan have been different translation for the same English word, for example: Cheese = 芝士 (HK) / 起司 (Taiwan) / 奶酪 (China) Toast = 多士 (HK) / 吐司 (Taiwan) / 烤面包 (China) Hence, it is ...


2

In Cantonese, we kept the character "baak1" but few people know that the original character is simply "迫". Unfortunately, "迫手指" is not acceptable in contemporary written Chinese. (Don't confuse it with "啪" which is pronounced as "paak1".) Edit: To translate "crack one's fingers", I think we can say "把手指扳得咯咯響".


2

It's just a transliteration from "sandwich", does not have real meaning. BTW: It's usually called "三文治" in Hong Kong and Macau.


2

Is there an official (bit of a stretch) translation for 凉虾 (米凉虾) in English? 凉虾 The page you've referenced is talking about a dish of cold shrimp seen in several cities on the mainland. You could just run that page through Google Translate for a pretty clear interpretation. Results of Google Translation show cold shrimp...: However, because this is a ...


2

Just use 动力, as in 航空动力, 生命动力 and 社会动力.


1

'Crack' in 'Crack Knuckles' is "咔", which is an onomatopoeia. The pinyin of "咔" is "ka", sounds just like "crack" for short. So I would translate 'Crack Knuckles' into "把指节扳得咔咔响"。 把 指节 扳得 咔咔 响 Knuckles pull Crack sound Means "pull the knuckles, make noise sounds like crack"



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