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13

Basically they have the same meanings. Now let's focus on the difference, but first wrap your head in duct tapes in case it explodes. 往往 is usually used with conditions supplied. Without any condition it is usually wrong: 我常常加班。 -- Good. 我往往加班。 -- Wrong. 北京常常下雪。-- Good. 北京往往下雪。 -- Wrong. 北京往往在冬天下雪。-- Good. Notice the constraint. ...


11

I'm not sure where you could get an accurate count for how many there are. Considering that loanwords have been coming into Chinese for thousands of years, it definitely won't be a trivial task. There is certainly quite a few, however, not all of which is current/widespread/universal. I'll list some here, and edit more in if I think of any later: Angel: ...


11

In this situation, I would say "您先请", which works fine. "您先请" means 'after you', which is very polite. If you really want to say 'Please, go in front of me' in Chinese, you could say "请走在我前面吧". However, this sounds a little bit strange. Note that you stand in a queue, you don't go in a queue. So "请站在我前面吧" is better.


10

有人 is someone, some people, anyone. 有人觉得我长得像


9

First of all, I'm Chinese and I'm a big fan of the Game of Thrones. I've read both the English and Chinese version of the novel. For Ramsey and Eyrie: Ra-m-sey, to mimic the "Ra" sound, because there is no such sound in Chinese, we use 拉(La1) instead. Actually a funny story is that there are a lot Chinese dialects in which people pronounce "R" as "L". One ...


9

That 三明治 came from transcribing the English word Sandwich into Chinese. That is to say, it is meant to approximate the pronunciation of the English word. You aren't meant to interpret the individual characters literally. As Stan points out, it is sometimes transcribed as 三文治 as well. Historically it has also been written as 三味治, but that's pretty much ...


9

Well... 深V is not a formal Chinese word, this word was created by bra-producers. Who are trying to emphasis that their bra can help you to squeeze a CLEAVAGE. After that, some dress producers who are making those dresses is very low V-neck and shows females cleavages say that their dresses are 深V, too. Anyway, in most cases, 深V is the word describing the ...


9

In a literal sense, 加油 means to step on the gas pedal when you drive a car. Imagine what happens when you step on the gas pedal? More gasoline is added to the engine. What happens when more gasoline is added to the engine? The engine roarsssss! If someone is having a hard time, they are like a car being stuck in the mud or a similar situation and unable to ...


9

I think your friend was asking how to arrange the evening, not literally ask the time to meet. 「今晚怎麼意思?」 means “Any plans tonight?" in English.


9

some people can be translated as 有人,某些人,有些人,有部分人


9

Same as English just without the for. 谢谢 + what. "thank you for the gift" = 谢谢 + 礼物 - maybe you would say 你送给我的礼物 or just 你的礼物 "you for inviting me for dinner" = 谢谢 + 邀请 + 晚餐 - so altogether you would say 谢谢你那天邀请我吃晚饭 (which is for what already happened - seeing as you're writing a card, so obviously you're thanking for the dinner you've already eaten and ...


8

I think "师资介绍" is better. As a Chinese native speaker, It's very intertesting for me to got this site. :D hahaha


8

Yes, there is: 废话 Example: A: You know what, a banana without the skin is more tasteful! B: 废话。 废话 is not a good word for kids to imitate, though. And it is rarely used between strangers or to your parents, as it may be impolite/offensive.


8

The proper translation is performance art, because that's what the Chinese name 行为艺术 was coined for. Although the literal meaning of the Chinese name is not quite the same as that of the English name, they refer to the same thing, and therefore should be taken as each others translation: as in fact, they are. For evidence I'll cite the English and Chinese ...


8

不客气 is a polite way of acknowledging someone's compliment or thanks. Although it literally translates to "don't be polite", once you consider some equivalent phrases, it's meaning becomes clear. Equivalents in Chinese: 不用谢 - (no need to thank [me]) 别客气 Equivalents in English: You're too kind Don't mention it Not at all


8

It's an internet slang, so you can't find it on a normal dictionary. 高 refers to 高高在上,高傲, which mean "to be arrogant", "to have an attitude of looking down upon someone" 冷 refers to 冷漠,冷冰冰, which mean "to be indifferent", "unconcern" so 高冷 basically means a cold attitude.


7

恶(e3) should be the one. When feeling disgusted, in Chinese people would say a long 恶(e3), like eee3... or 恶心(e3 xin1)as an adjective to mean disgusted, which literally means disgusted heart, or in English to have a disgusted heart (feeling) toward someone or something.


7

We can break this up into three parts 不见面 - to not meet 也有 - also has 不见面的好 - the good aspect (or benefits) of not meeting There's also benefits of not meeting (or not seeing (each other)).


7

In Chinese「地」is the adverb marker. It's used bewtween an adverb and the verb it describes. The phrase「再一次」 acts like a adverb whcih means "do something once again". So use 「地」after 「再一次」 and the verb behind it。 Example: 「再一次地感谢大家」 --> Thanks everyone once again. And 「地」can be omitted in this case, so 「再一次地感谢大家」 --> 「再一次感谢大家」 This kind of usage is usually ...


7

The idiom's meaning is reinforced by the rhyme. I think you have the basic meaning correct. Maybe if you rhyme it in English it'll come out more like the Chinese: "People are iron/Rice is steel/You'll feel like crap without a meal" - not a literal meaning, but conveying the gist.


7

It should be '玉液'. But it often used together with another word '琼浆'. 琼浆玉液 is often used to describe extremely delicious things to drink, like wine or tea...


7

The characters read: 忠于毛主席 Zhōng yú Máo zhǔxí 忠 means faithful, 于 is a multi-use preposition which, to me, sounds a bit archaic/formal, and here means "to", but can also mean "in" or "on", 毛 is Mao Zedong's surname, and 主席 means "chairman". So this translates to "Faithful to Chairman Mao". By the way, if you give the correct characters to Google, the ...


7

享受一切理所应当的美好 = enjoy all the beauty you deserve Here, 'beauty' refers to the nice features that Mac and Sogou provide. However, this expression seems to be a little bit strange. Usually, we do not put the word 理所应当的 before a noun. For example, instead of saying '这是理所应当的美好', one should say '这份美好是理所应当的'.


7

The other answers covered the translation part. I am going to give my two cents on the culture side. Is there a set-phrase that is often used to express this idea? I don't think so, because traditionally Chinese don't really respond that way. If someone is 'predicting' your order, he's really saying 'I know what you like' as a gesture of intimacy, ...


7

男兒 is MAN 當 is 應當, which means SHOULD,MUST 自 means 自己, SELF 強 is a verb short for 圖強,here 圖 means FIND WAYS TO DO STH,and 強 means TO BE STRONG. So 男兒當自強 means A man should find ways to make himself strong


7

肚 is belly, 胃 is stomach. So: 啤酒肚: Beer belly. 肚子疼: Pain in the belly, could be the stomach, but may well be the appendage. 大肚婆: Slang for pregnant woman. 小肚子: The underbelly. Formal: 下腹 or 小腹. 肚脐: Belly button. 肚量大: Big-hearted. (Funny, but we also say 心胸宽广.) When you read it as dǔ, it means the stomach of an animal: 猪肚, 牛肚, ...


6

I looked at some articles about Laozi, Taoism and Tea. What I found was the phrase "the froth of liquid jade" might not be due to Laozi, though there are some English Internet articles saying so. What I found was the following: 1) There is no Chinese literature saying Laozi used the phrase 琼浆玉液 to describe tea. Actually, Laozi did like tea, but it was ...


6

When translating literatures or films, there is a convention that the personal or place names would not be translated strictly by their original meanings or pronunciations. And the translation would not have a single logic. I don't know what translator's thought, but although the meanings of "小指头" and "小指" are similar, "小指头" just sounds more like a name (I ...


6

This depends on the method used to generate the sound. The actual "cracking" is not generally mentioned when speaking about this phenomena in Chinese. Instead, the act that you perform to get the sound is the focus of the phrase. For example, "cracking your knuckles" would become something like "squeezing your fingers", which is "捏手指", 捏 being "to pinch". ...



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