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0

"無意之中流露出来" == "reveal something unintentionally" "無意流露出来" is unnatural. "流露" by itself is somehow unintentional already. We usually say "無意**顯**露出来" (== "unwilling to or intentionally not to reveal something")


4

The first one is straightforward - it means showing one's intent unwittingly. The second one is a bit tricky to interpret. It does mean the same thing in the examples you quoted. However, "无意之中" and "无意" are not the same. For example, I can say "他无意上学" (he doesn't intend to go to school) but it is wrong to say that "他无意之中上学". Note that "他" makes no attempt ...


0

In Chinese, "无意之中" means unwittingly, but "无意" means "不是故意的", that is to say, not intentional. The former means "you let it slip", the latter focus on you were not intend to do this.


1

This part of the conversation doesn't sound natural to me. A rhetorical question like 什么叫xyz is only used after the other person labeled him xyz. Without a previous line like 你是活腻歪了吧, the usage seems out of the blue and ambiguous. After watching the video, I think what happened is there is something along that line in the original script but got edited out ...


0

Same as 找死(court death). Widely used in north-east China.


1

"什么叫活腻歪了" (1)活腻歪is meaning don't want to live anymore. for example, if you wanna jump into the sea, i will say "you are 活腻歪了" (2)so, the meaning of '什么叫活腻歪了' is 'what is the meaning of 活腻歪了?' it is a rhetorical question. (3)'什么叫活腻歪了 我是来找人的', so, the 小贩 was not wanna die, he just wanna find someone (我是来找人的) :)


2

I would say your "What comes around, goes around." is a good translation. Another idiom you can use is "You reap what you sow." The only small drawback with both is that they don't necessarily imply suffering justice/reprisal for criminal activity, as the Chinese phrase does. I say small drawback however, because with context that shouldn't generally be a ...


-1

Guilt will be punished sooner or later.


4

简介 is actually a short form of 简单介绍, a brief introduction, while 介绍 is introduction. In this way they are interchangable just as they are in english 导语 - 'lead', i.e. the few words you will see at the beginning of a novel. 入门 - 'getting started', i.e. Macbook for dummies = Macbook 入门 you get the idea for the rest: 引导/引子 - 'guide' 导论 - a more detailed ...


3

It does not make sense. Maybe a typo. (from a copy-paste error?) I think it should be 特长和能力 (specialties and abilities).


2

You've asked something "more appropriate taking into account the context?". Taking consideration that this being coming from a resume, I hold that this "长和能力" is very likely to be missing a character that would have formed a word with "长". It is likely to be “长处” ("merit", "strength" or "advantage; lit. where it's long), making the whole “长处和能力” (Strength ...


1

Like people already suggested, its good to say: 我的代码终于跑起来了! “跑” as in the sense of "to run" (the program) is a calque from English to Chinese. It's very literal and very easy to understand. Just like "sky craping tower" is loaned and translated literally as “摩天楼” (rub-sky-building)and very much make sense.


2

终于跑了!should be a good one. (Literally means finally - it is - running) In this case, 跑 means a program IS RUNNING, but not ESCAPING.


2

We say 跑起来了(informal). 这破程序我改了半天,终于能跑起来了! [I worked and worked and worked on that 'piece of code', finally it worked.]


2

“运行” “通过” 我的代码终于可以运行了! it's usual way to say so


4

我的代码终于可以了 is close to My code is ok now, you can say something more clearly like 我的代码终于可以 运行 工作 跑(起来) 了!


1

Split it up to questions, omit the second modal particle "吗" 我需要带 XXX 吗?[...] 还是只要带影印本? or, combine into one sentence, omit the second verb "带" 我需要带XXX, [...] 还是只要影印本?


0

以柔制刚 means something like: use softness to overcome hardness overcome hardness with softness, conquer the unyielding with the yielding (打一食品) means: guess a food —— might mean it's two letters, you said it's English right? The answer? Maybe the answer is MM like M&Ms? Edit: what's soft on the outside and hard on the inside?


4

我认为,我觉得,依我看,在我看来,依我之见,etc. In your condition both are okay. But in daily life I would say 我觉得 since it's more common and informal. 窃以为 is an ancient-feel formal word for that , so is 恕我愚见.


0

No reason to split this into two sentences. XXX here we can just call this 原件. Photocopy is 复印件 Since we are asking between two things we would need to use 还是. 要带原件还是复印件? Examples of usages (from a quick baidu search) 面试时的证件是要带原件还是复印件? 去医院生产要带哪些证件? 原件还是复印件?? 现在在银行卡还需要带身份证复印件吗?还是只带原件 给宝宝上户口要带各种证件的原件还是只带复印件


1

group dynamics - 群体互动(行为) social dynamics - 社会互动(行为) psychodynamics - 心理活动(学) sociodynamics - 社会动力(学)


2

Just use 动力, as in 航空动力, 生命动力 and 社会动力.


1

It is very common seeing shortened and generalized terms in PRC. 地震、泥石流、地面塌陷、火山爆发 ... --(generalize)--> 地质灾害 --(shorten)--> 地灾 Making things unspecified is some kind of trend, even in daily context. For example, people write "建議" instead of 提醒/主張/敦促/呼籲/規勸/勸告/忠告/勸諭/勸阻/警告/告誡/.... and "選擇" instead of 惟有/不如/只好/寧願/寧可/情願/甘願/決意/被迫/故意/.... The more unspecified ...


4

The proper translation is geologic hazards. It is used to refer to any disaster that result from either human land use or natural geological processes. Consequently, it is quite a large and, yes, unspecific, group of disasters. In China, generally speaking it refers to one of the following: Rockfalls Mudslides Landslides Ground subsidences Sinkholes Earth ...


1

"Tiny rice orzo in light sweet soup" .... um .... doesn't sound sexy at all For traditional foods, I prefer keeping their original pronunciation.


4

Looks like the character for laughter in Chinese 笑'xiao'


1

意饺 doesn't have any real meaning, it's just a name given to a foreign nouns that aren't seen in China (or foreign proper nouns). In this case, it can be used as an umbrella term to any italian stuffed pasta (because they all resemble dumplings); however there are probably additional characters that can be added to denote a more specific type of pasta ...


2

Is there an official (bit of a stretch) translation for 凉虾 (米凉虾) in English? 凉虾 The page you've referenced is talking about a dish of cold shrimp seen in several cities on the mainland. You could just run that page through Google Translate for a pretty clear interpretation. Results of Google Translation show cold shrimp...: However, because this is a ...


1

'Crack' in 'Crack Knuckles' is "咔", which is an onomatopoeia. The pinyin of "咔" is "ka", sounds just like "crack" for short. So I would translate 'Crack Knuckles' into "把指节扳得咔咔响"。 把 指节 扳得 咔咔 响 Knuckles pull Crack sound Means "pull the knuckles, make noise sounds like crack"


4

This is Chinese (and it's written in Simplified Chinese). "苹果" means "apple"; and "帝国" means "Empire". The whole phrase could be translated as "The Apple Empire" or "The Empire of Apple" into English.


3

Far as I know, names such as 意饺 really don't refer to any specifics - instead, they are simply names given to foreign foods that resemble their "chinese counterparts." 饺子 refers to boiled dumplings (note, dumplings alone refers to, ambiguously, 粽子, 饺子, and 包子) - where a stuffing is wrapped in a layer of dough and boiled in water. Thus, 意大利 饺子 really refers ...


1

I would use 压关节,压指头,挤关节,扳指头. I am from the north of China.


0

My colleagues often say : "嗯哼~","Uh huh" "显然","obviously" "然后呢",is not in literal meaning "Then what?" ,it means that you have said is not enough,barely nothing. And the speaker doesn't really want you to continue,like you don't have the answer.


2

use 废话,那还用说,很明显啊,很显然啊,when speaking to your buddy. 嗯,是啊,确实,when speaking to your college or someone in a formal situation.


2

The terms would be radically different for China or Hong Kong audience. (But are you sure that you could obtain the approval "to stay" in the China market with triad-related contents?)


2

During the May Fourth Movement, many terms were "imported" from Japan to enrich the Chinese vocabulary for translation of Western idea. Not to mention that China, Hong Kong and Taiwan have been different translation for the same English word, for example: Cheese = 芝士 (HK) / 起司 (Taiwan) / 奶酪 (China) Toast = 多士 (HK) / 吐司 (Taiwan) / 烤面包 (China) Hence, it is ...


2

In Cantonese, we kept the character "baak1" but few people know that the original character is simply "迫". Unfortunately, "迫手指" is not acceptable in contemporary written Chinese. (Don't confuse it with "啪" which is pronounced as "paak1".) Edit: To translate "crack one's fingers", I think we can say "把手指扳得咯咯響".


3

Adding to the previous list: Bowling: 保龄球 bao ling qiu 滾木球 Buffet: 蒲飞 pu fei 自助餐 Calorie: 卡路里 ka lu li 热量单位 Cartoon: 卡通 ka tong 漫画 Motor: 摩托 mo tuo 电动机 Sundae: 新低 xin di 水果奶油,冰淇淋 T-Shirt: T-血 T-xue 短袖汗衫, 短袖圆领衫 Toast: 多士,吐司 duo shi, tu si 烤面包 Vitamin: 维他命 wei ta ming 维生素


6

This depends on the method used to generate the sound. The actual "cracking" is not generally mentioned when speaking about this phenomena in Chinese. Instead, the act that you perform to get the sound is the focus of the phrase. For example, "cracking your knuckles" would become something like "squeezing your fingers", which is "捏手指", 捏 being "to pinch". ...



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