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The only times I've ever needed to use 师傅 is to address taxi drivers rather than calling them 司机 (driver), it sounds better as a respect kind of thing In the taxi context, I guess by calling 师傅, you are referring to person behind the wheel as the person who gives you guidance (to where you need to go) rather than a 司机 which may imply a someone who follows ...


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They're called 合文! (combined characters ) or 合书! http://baike.baidu.com/view/2915764.htm ( Good question - I was also curious about this a while back ) :)


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For people to understand better...


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All of it is correct. These two styles is loaned,「」 from Japanese,"" and 《》are from western countries. Chinese original marks 句读 are deprecated。 In mainland, the usages of "" are identical to English. You can also use 「」 instead, especially in vertical text. though it is not very popular ,but definitely acceptable. ﹏﹏ is used in ancient texts.I have ...


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I don't know the Traditional, but in Simplified , “” and 《》 is the formal way.


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List your good points. Meaning instead of outright rejecting this person's offer, you say, "I already have such and such already," you get the picture. Emphasize that you are very well off, no need for gifts and such. So if someone offered a gift to you, you could say, "Thank you, but I have a lot of such and such." And the good ol' "I'm on a diet" works ...


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Welcome more questions Thomas. Very good answer above. It is a Spring Couplet 挥春/揮春. 招財進寶 is an auspicious saying to wish families bring more wealth and treasure. Chinese paste this on the front door or wall before the Chinese New Year. and they renew it annually. Some business companies like this lucky saying so they paste it too. Otherwise, "福" Fu is ...


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This is actually not one character, but a stylistic conglomeration of the characters in the phrase 招財進寶, meaning "ushering in wealth and prosperity". The characters 財 and 寶 end up being represented with the same 貝 component in this "character". While the left side of 招 (扌) and the right side of 財 (才) are technically not the same component, they look similar ...


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Maybe 以子之矛,攻子之盾 is the answer, I couldn't find another alternative. Description on Baidu Baike


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同事 is the most common, plain one. it simply means people you work with or people in the same company as you do. It could be used no matter it is a everyday conversation, a quite formal business meeting or a HR policy notice. 同儕(同侪) means peers or fellows. Strictly it should be used to refer people in the same generation of you, i.e. siblings or cousins. ...


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(The following explanation is based on the language habits of my hometown, close to Beijing) Slang evolution: 吃饱了撑的没事干 -> 吃饱了撑的 -> 吃饱了 Meaning: Too full (or have eaten too much) and have nothing to do. It implies one have extra energy, which further implies one has spend this extra energy on unnecessary stupidity. e.g. A: 他看到你的古董花瓶很破旧,就当作垃圾给扔了。He tossed ...


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I am a Chinese speaker. No, Nothing is relating to meal was good, just you are done, you are full. no more eating. When Chinese greet they always say: Have you eaten yet? Yes, I did. 你吃饭了没有?吃了。 好 not really means good, just as done in some phrases.做好了,写好了,安装好了。 you make sense? And they are same meaning, interchangeable.


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I would say that "我吃飽了" is "I'm full now" while "我吃好了" is "I'm done eating now", so saying that you're done would be more polite compared to saying that you're full


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It simply implies kind of a care to you.If you say you're already full,that means you enjoy this meal and want no more.Sometimes,when you say you are full,it implies that you can do other things concentratedly.


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The word “我很好” means “I am all right”. “是”is a verb(“动词”)which is equivalent to "is","am","are" in English. When most Chinese students including me learn English at very start,they tend to translating the sentence word by word,e.g. I am fine wo3 shi4 hen3 hao3 我 是 很 好


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It is nothing more than a sympathetic gesture. The more general 吃饭了没有? just means ”how ya doing?”, ”are you alright?”.


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When asking a Chinese person "are you full" when eating a meal its like asking "are you enjoying your meal?" The host will be happy if he knows you are full. But when someone says 你吃飽了嗎? to you when not eating a meal. it means "Are you stupid?" or "Are you crazy?"


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It has more of an 'are you satisfied?' feel.


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A blue-rules notebook 蓝横格本 rule, 横格 grid, 方格


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The word you are looking for is 勿: 請勿靠近車門 cing2 mat6 kaau3 gan6 ce1 mun4 (Jyutping romanization) The usage of 請勿 ("Please don't") is considered formal or literary in Cantonese, so it's not typically heard in common speech, but you'll often see it on signs or in public announcements. EDIT: Just wanted to also add that your deduction of the Mandarin is ...



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