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2

The short answer is yes, especially in written. It's kind of “文言文” so may hardly be seen in oral speaking. 游览路线也依旧如故,未长未短 Here “未长未短” means "it is neither longer nor shorter than before", in other words, "its (the route's) length is not changed". Let's read the whole sentence again and you will be clearer. ...


1

ID: 编号 Process: 程序 Food category: 食品类别 Standard: 标准 Frequency (as in how many times per day or every how many hours): 频率 Min. Value: 低标 Max. Value: 高标 Food Correction (or Corrective Action): 改正措施 Check List Item Caption: 清单项目标语 (标题 is title) Question Group: 问题组 Template: 模板 Repeat Observation: 重复观察? Policy: 规章制度 Order index: 订购类别 ...


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你的脑袋是什么做的?or 脑袋进水啦? There's also a rhyme in Cantonese 头大无脑,脑大长草 haha


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你脑袋长在屁股 means Your brain is located at your butt 树多必有枯枝,人多必有白痴 means If there are lot of trees, there must be a deadwood; If there are a lot people, there must be an idiot. I'm a native chinese speaker so I know a lot. If you want more just comment below :3


2

I have to say that this depends on the situation the words appear. If a mother said "你真笨" to her own child, or call her child "小笨孩"/"小笨蛋", with a nice smile on her face, then it is not insulting. But if you see a boss said "你真笨" to an employee with a anger face, then in this situation it is a kind of insulting. Almost all Chinese words that seems insulting ...


5

I don't know if there is a way to politely insult someone's intellect, that almost seems like an oxymoron to me. 糊涂 (silly) is the only expression I can think of that doesn't stigmatize the addressee too much. But I would under no circumstance apply it to my boss or my in-laws or a teacher or anyone with whom one has to be respectful. E.g. 你这么糊涂! How ...


0

笨蛋 and 傻子 both mean fool or idiot and may be put in this category. Depending on "how" you say it, it can be non-insulting but clearly expressing the "sillyness" of the counterpart.


3

I can't find a resource to cite from, but here's what I know. In some grammar textbooks, whether Chinese or English, words like this are referred to as a Prepositional Adverb, or words that are very similar in its form to a preposition but functions as an adverb. EDIT I am not certain about this, but some say that 以後(后) is one of the post-positions, ...


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I think "after returning home" is an adverb phrase. "After" is the preposition as you said.


2

Chinese has a number of post-positions (后置介词), instead of pre-position in English. But I have not seen an expert using this term. A preposition or post-position (介词) is a word that requests a noun (介词宾语) to form a phrase (介词短语). This phrase could be used as an adverb (介词短语作状语). For example, (1) 他们是工厂的工人. They are workers of the factory. (2) 桌子上有一本书. ...


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供不應求 - literally 'supply/not/satisfied/demand' 僧多粥少 - idiom, not enough congee for the monks


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It should be "蜂拥”, rather than "轰涌”. And you can call the goods which is very popular "抢手货".



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