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17

In general they're about the same. They are actually used to define each other in some dictionaries. Colloquial usages might differ, but in most cases you can safely use 肯 in place of 願意, especially when spoken. There is a little difference though. While both words mean agreement/acceptance, with 肯 its acceptance regardless of whether you are happy/willing. ...


12

願意 and 肯 are NOT (exactly) the same. Basically, (I). 願意 is on the more positively-willing to do side. 意 has 心 in it, so 願意 means that the person is willing to do it from one's heart. It generically carries positive feelings. Ex: 網球選手 R Federer 願意 放棄參加網球賽,因為他的雙胞胎(雙生子)剛出生. ->Tennis player R Federer wishes to give up some tennis games, because his ...


10

Stepping in for my Chinese to Australian translations: Also a couple of other phrases that are good to keep in your toolkit Thank you 谢谢 Xièxiè Is the most basic and common way of saying thank you Australian Translation: Cheers Thanks 谢谢你 Xièxiè nǐ This is a more sincere or formal way of saying thank you Australian Translation: Thank you Thanks Heaps ...


10

There are some differences between these two words. > “着急” Used as an adjective: 1. Something emergent happens (in other words, something horrible or fatal is very likely going to happen), and you feel upset. For example, when you lost your kids or you're going to be late for your work. Example 一位母亲因为找不到她的孩子而非常着急。(Can't use "担心") A ...


10

确定 means 'be sure' or 'comfirm'/'be confirmed'. 我确定他会回来的.(I'm sure he will be back.) 决定 (v) means 'decide to do'. 我决定做...(I decide to do something...) 决定 (n) means 'decision'. 我终于做出了决定.(Finally, I made my decision.)


10

高兴 means glad, a temporary state of mind. E.g: I'm glad it's sunny today -- 今天是晴天, 我很高兴. 快乐 means happy, and I agree it's the only one in the list that can be used for festivals. E.g. 节日快乐 (happy holiday). 我很快乐 (I'm very happy -- in this case same as 高兴). 愉快 means pleasant. That's why you see it used with "weekend" -- have a pleasant weekend = 周末愉快. It's ...


9

To understand the differences properly, you need to know what is 面 and what is 边. 面 is a face whereas 边 is an edge. An edge is like a line guiding you the direction. A face is what is facing you giving you a sense of position. 前/后面 is used to describe the position of something within your visual range. Whereas, 前/后边 is more appropriately used to describe ...


8

Their meanings are somewhat different. In a few situations, they are interchangeable, but there are many others where you can only use one and not the other. The key difference is that 呗 is much more assertive, even rhetorical, whereas 吧 can be used to express doubt or uncertainty as well. For completeness I'll cover them all. Definitions taken from ...


8

When you use "临时", your point is "wasn't part of the plan". When you use "及时", your point is "rapidly/promptly". So if you replacing "好象是临时决定的" with "好象是及时决定的", it also works but the point will become to "They made the decision promptly" from "They made the decision that wasn't the part of the plan (of the meeting)". Of cource "临时" has other meanings, ...


8

Yes you can definitely use “妳好“ when addressing female. However notice that in Chinese there isn't a strict usage defined to differentiate addressing male and female. If you use "你" instead, the reader will not (and probably should not) assume a male is addressed in the context. In other word, "你好" is perfectly fine to address female without any ...


8

The most polite way is to use: 借过 excuse me -ABC If you want to sound politer you can add a 一下 on the end: 借过一下. 让 is not super polite, with or without a 一下 but you could still get away using it. A simple 不好意思 would also suffice but is not as polite as 借过.


7

免费 means free of charge. As pointed out by Wikipedia, it is usually applied to commercial products or services that normally charge money and now for free as a part of business strategy. E.g. 免费的午餐 (free lunch), 免费试吃 (free sample of food), etc. 无偿 means no compensation, or 'not asking anything for return'. It is usually applied to non-profit, voluntary ...


7

马铃薯 (commonly known as 土豆 in Northeastern China) is the general term for potato. (炸/马铃)薯条 is commonly understood as French fries (hot chips). By default, both 炸 and 马铃 are redundant. 土豆条 and 炸土豆条 are the less common terms for French fries. Other related terms: 薯片 - potato chips / potato crisps / packet chips 薯泥 - mashed potato 薯餅 - hash brown 烤马铃薯 - ...


7

I am a Chinese. 新 means new and 生 means unfamiliar. In your daily study, a word you first see could be either 新词 (new word) or 生词 (unfamiliar word) to you. However, in public articles, 新词 usually stand for newly made word (ABSOLUTELY NEW TO EVERYONE), and 生词 stand for unfamiliar word (RELATIVELY NEW TO SOMEONE). Hope this helps.


7

冬季 is more formal than 冬天. When used to refer to the season itself, the former is more commonly found in literature, the latter in vernacular. However, when used to refer to something of that season, i.e. in a noun phrase, the 冬季 form is almost always used. For examples, "winter fashion" is 冬季服装, "Winter Olympics" is 冬季奥运会*. You would never use 冬天 for ...


7

I think I really need more context to tell the differences. Sometimes they are interchangeable. 变成 -> Become / Turn into 五年过去了,我从一个学生变成了一名老师 - I was a student. After 5 years I am a teacher now. 变化 -> Difference / Change (mostly used as noun) 五年过去了,这里还是没有什么变化 - After 5 years there's nothing changed. 变得 -> It's like 变成 but it should be used before a ...


6

Yes, people use ‘kuài’ in conversation, as in ‘yī qiān duō kuài’ (over 1,000 NT$). You can also add ‘qián’ to make it clear you’re talking about amounts of money: ‘wŭ shí kuài qián’ (50 NT$). You might want to use ‘(xīn) tái bì’ when changing money, as in ‘qĭng gĕi wŏ tái bì’ (please give me Taiwan dollars). I don’t know what was used in previous ...


6

The character 分 has two different readings. As fen1, it has a range of meanings. As fen4, it can mean a role or part played by a person, a more general part or portion of something, or a component. Fen4 can also be written 份, and dictionaries I consulted from both Taiwan and the mainland don’t seem to differ here. The Far East Chinese-English Dictionary, ...


6

醡醬麵 and 炸醬麵 炸醬麵 can work as it means "noodles with fried sauce" 醡醬麵 is "noodles with extracted sauce (e.g. extracting oil)" 炸 fried (火 fire radical + phonetic 乍 zhà) 醡 extract (酉 container + 窄 narrow; from 穴 hole and 乍) Archaic character for 榨 (tool for extraction process. 木 wood used to refer to tools in this case) 醬 sauce 麵 noodles Alternatively, ...


6

They are identical when used as an Adverb. 天空突然/忽然下起了大雨。 But 突然 can also be used as a complement of a verb. 这雨下得太突然了。 Where you can only use 突然。


6

Good question. Although I am a native chinese speaker, it is difficult for me to answer your questions. Generally, when talking about formality difference, 被 is more formal than the other two, 叫 and 让. However, it is still very often for us to use 被 in some oral conversation. But I don't know which one among these three is more northern or more southern. I ...


6

I'll assume you mean 帘 as in the simplified Chinese for 簾. In which case, strictly speaking: 帘 / 簾 is a cover for windows woven from bamboo slips (hence the traditional top radical) or fabric 帷 is curtains, in the sense of sides a tent woven from fabrics. In practice, they both mean some sort of fabric material that obscures sight, and therefore usages ...


6

Typically one would "position" a product in the marketplace. If you are in the act of doing something (process is active now) then the phrase would be "positioning" [a/our/the] product in the marketplace. I would suggest you take a look at your proposed word choice in Jukuu.com. Plugging in the word for "position," yields the following usages: ...


5

First you were right by using 什么 to mean "something" in Chinese. However, 了 is a past tense indicator, which was not supposed to be there because you didn't hang out yet. The correct way to say “Do something together” in Chinese is: 一起做些什么 or 一起做点什么


5

They have same meaning, same usage(“叫做”Vs“叫作”) and same pronunciation, so you don't need to figure out them consciously in spoken Chinese. But it seems "叫作" is recommended when writing(宜写“叫作”不宜写“叫做”).


5

if by 无用 you mean useless and by one word you mean one character then I would recommend: 废 it has a lot of meanings but specifically here it contains the meaning: waste; useless; disused; superfluous in ²fèizhǐ -ABC


5

As many have said the "proper" way to refer to the currency of Taiwan is 新台币 (Xīn tái bì) which is literally broken down to 新 (Xīn) = New and 台币 (tái bì) = Taiwan Dollars Old Taiwan dollars are referred to as 舊臺幣* (旧台币) (jiù tái bì) However you would only refer to them by these proper names when dealing with multiple currencies. When referring to ...


5

Yes you can, let me first give the possible short version of the example you gave: What is your name? FULL VERSION: 你叫什么名字?/你的名字是什么?(What's your name?) SHORT VERSION 1: 你叫什么? (Here we don't usually say 叫什么? as its tone is more rude or intimidating. To make the tone softer, normally you could add 呀ya/啊ah at the end such as 叫什么呀?And it also could ...


5

They are similar in the meaning, however, not exactly the same. 其他 has a meaning of "the others", but it also has the meaning of "the rest", since this word is often used in the last when you are listing some categories, for example, "这个项目, 小王负责写代码, 小李负责 code review, 其他人去做测试." this word has the meaning in dividing the scopes. 别的 also has the meaning of ...


5

Yes there are differences. 火车 literally means "fire car", and it got this name since the steam locomotive era when trains relied on buring coal as fuel. Later this word is generalized to refer to trains. But with modern technology developing, for example 高铁 (High Speed EMU Train), official media usually referes to it as 高铁列车, not 高铁火车. I guess it's because ...



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