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15

If it hangs (not responding to any input), you could say 我的电脑死机了。 If the screen blacks out, you could say 我的电脑黑屏了。 If it doesn't turn on, you could say 我的电脑不亮了。 or 我的电脑打不开了。 If it is completely broken and needs major repair, you could say 我的电脑坏了。 or 我的电脑完蛋了。 Note: All above are used in Mainland China. I know they're ...


12

酷!= "Cool!", transliteration from English 酷毙了!= "Cool to die for" (was a popular phrase in the 90s) 牛! = literally means bull, but here means "genius"; used to describe people only 他数学太牛了!He's so good at math! 这个杂技演员太牛了!The acrobat is so talented! 太棒了!= literally "Too great!", or "Fantastic!" 爸妈下周带我们去海边。Mom and Dad will take us to the ...


9

他很酷 (tā hěn kù) means "He is cool". This is a transliteration of "cool" using the sounds found in the Chinese language. I'm sure there are other ways to say it, but that is the most direct that I know of. 他很帅 (tā hěn shuài) is closer to "He is handsome". This could also be used to say someone is "cool-looking", I believe. 棒 (bàng) means great, awesome, ...


9

There are a few substitutes I can think of: 信任是要靠努力得来的 (trust is obtained through hard work) 信任是要争取的 (trust must be fought for) 信任是要赢得的 (trust must be won) 信任是要经营的 (trust needs to be maintained) 信任是要用时间去积累的 (trust is acquired over a period of time) If you are looking for a word, I think 争取[zhēngqǔ] is a good replacement for 赚 because it means to put in ...


9

I think it is a terribly bad idea learning Mandarin by trying to map grammar from Western languages onto it. There is no such thing as countable nouns in Chinese, precisely because nouns do not have plurals. Conversely, you can make any noun ”countable” by adding a classifier to it: 你要一杯咖啡吗?


8

The most appropriate translation to make sense would probably be 有道理, which literally means has sense or reason. For example: 你说的有道理 What you said is reasonable / What you said makes sense. The phrase 说不通 would probably work, but it is not used frequently in Mainland China Mandrian(普通话) as 有道理 for the same context, if at all. As for 符合逻辑, the phrase ...


7

A few that are used the most in my surroundings: 好吧 (in a helpless tone) = Fine. 随便 = whatever. 都行 = whatever. 无所谓 = I don't care. 你说[X]就[X]吧 = If you say so.


7

It's 补丁. Like the English word "patch", this word can also mean "a piece of cloth used to cover holes in clothes when they get worn".


6

Well, avoid the exclamation mark. 請保持安靜! Please keep quiet! 安靜! Quiet! 小聲點! Lower your voice! 請小聲點! Please lower your voice! These from the above are a little commanding in tone, especially the second and third. You may change the tone by switching to a request rather than a command. 能否請你安靜 is relatively better. I usually go with ...


6

Yes, people use ‘kuài’ in conversation, as in ‘yī qiān duō kuài’ (over 1,000 NT$). You can also add ‘qián’ to make it clear you’re talking about amounts of money: ‘wŭ shí kuài qián’ (50 NT$). You might want to use ‘(xīn) tái bì’ when changing money, as in ‘qĭng gĕi wŏ tái bì’ (please give me Taiwan dollars). I don’t know what was used in previous ...


6

I can't recall any Chinese expressions used in the same way as calling out with 'Surprise!' in English. I guess the reason might be that Chinese Culture doesn't make Chinese people as playful as English Culture making its people. We say something different from 'surprise!' in similar cases: I bring a gift to a friend, before showing him/her the gift, I ...


5

Here is a full translation of your conversation. A: 我从没去过中国。 B: 你对中国文化有什么看法 A: 正如我说过的,我从没去过中国。 As you can see, "like I said" is "正如我说过的" in Chinese. A word-to-word translation would be "like" ⟶ "正如/就如/就像" I ⟶ "我" "said" ⟶ "说过的".


5

Although not a direct translation, "沒關係/没关系" or "沒問題/没问题" can also sometimes mean "don't worry" depending on context. 沒關係/没关系 - It doesn't matter (note: not suitable for the 2nd example) 沒問題/没问题 - No problems (ok for both examples)


5

In my experience, usually we say: 我的電腦當機了。 (My computer crashed.) or 我的電腦壞掉了。 (My computer is broken.) or 我的電腦不能用了。 (My computer can't be used anymore.) and I think people can understand when you just simply translate it 我的電腦死了。 (My computer died.) From Taiwan, but only from my experiences...


5

The general idea for this idiom is that there's no guarantee for (whatever matter you are referring to) to come to fruition yet, likely whatever it was hasn't even been started. No way. Another way of saying this in Chinese is "(事情)还没有眉目" The character 八 (eight) is written with 2 strokes, the first one is 撇 (to the left), and the second one is 捺 (to the ...


5

As many have said the "proper" way to refer to the currency of Taiwan is 新台币 (Xīn tái bì) which is literally broken down to 新 (Xīn) = New and 台币 (tái bì) = Taiwan Dollars Old Taiwan dollars are referred to as 舊臺幣* (旧台币) (jiù tái bì) However you would only refer to them by these proper names when dealing with multiple currencies. When referring to ...


5

Actually 金 and 柑 are both pronounced gam1 in Cantonese, according to Rita Mei-Wah Choy’s ‘Read and Write Chinese’. While it may be better to refer to Shantou as Chaozhou (潮州), I think CA55CE37 is onto something here. Indeed, in chaozhouhua 大橘/桔 (orange) and 大吉 (great luck) are apparently near homophones. A Thai source I have mentions this as well and ...


5

Chinese doesn't distinguish countable or uncountable. We have unit word in front of almost every noun.


5

The other answers are absolutely correct – it’s not smart to talk about countable and uncountable nouns in Chinese. However, like many languages, Chinese does have words that express abstract concepts or that are somehow inherently plural. How are these dealt with in a system where everything must be counted/measured? Here’s how one grammar explains it. ...


4

You can say: 当我年轻的时候,... 我年轻的时候,... 年轻的时候,... 年轻时,... In these cases, you are talking about the time when you were a young man (note: not a kid nor a teenager). Perhaps you are now in your 40s/50s/60s etc, and you are talking about your 20s/30s. You could also say: 当我年幼的时候,... 当我还小的时候,... 我年幼的时候,... 我还小的时候,... 我小时候,... ...


4

烈酒 means hard liquor. 洋酒 means western liquor. Conceivably it could include wine and such, but it usually refers to western hard liquor (e.g., whiskey, vodka, rum). Here's an example sentence for your benefit: The city of Guangzhou consumes nearly 40% of the foreign hard liquor sold in China. 广州人所消费的烈酒,占了中国洋酒总量的近40%。


4

It will be easier to answer this question if a more specific scenario is given. Let me try to suggest one: A: 能不能再加一小时班? 明天绝对不会再让你加班了 (Could you work overtime again for an extra hour? I won't ask you tomorrow, I promise.) B: 好吧... 既然你已经这么说了, 那我还能说什么呢? (O--k--ay--, If you say so... :-| ) If you simply want to say "O--k--ay--" in Chinese, with ...


4

The word "sophisticated" has several meanings. As you have already stated in your question the meaning in context being "a person or their thoughts, reactions, and understanding, being aware of and able to interpret complex issues", I will try to elaborate on this meaning first before going into the details. Being sophisticated does not mean being, 精明 ...


4

I don't think there is an exact Chinese counterpart for 'sophisticated'. It depends on the context. 世故 (worldly) is the context-agnostic translation but sometimes it has a negative connotation of slyness. When you use it on a 10-year old, it's almost surely negative. Like the other comment mentioned, (少年)老成 can be used when to say a kid is sophisticated, ...


4

嘴馋 should be the one. 馋 in this case means piggish or greedy for food, particularly in a situation that one is not really hungry, but just wants something to be in the mouth for chewing.


4

In my opinion, if you are adult and the person who droppd wallet is: younger than 11, you can call him or her "小朋友"; at the age of 11 to 18, you can call him or her "同学"; at the age of 18 to 24, you can call him "同学", "帅哥(cool man)", and call her "同学", "美女(beautiful girl)"; at the age of 24 to 35, you can call him "帅哥", and call her "美女"; older than 30, it ...


4

According to the Wikipedia article on bánh pía, which cites this source, pía comes from from the Teochew dialect (i.e., Chaozhouhua 潮州話): The Vietnamese name comes from the Theochew word for pastry, "pia" While I wouldn't necessarily consider this source to be authoritative, I looked up the Teochew pronunciation of 餅 here, and it is indeed pĩã so the ...


3

I've never heard such a combination for (黑海/地中海). Such combinations can be made up when needed. 中日 is used more often when may not need further explanation. 中 can be also combination with the initial character for other country names to form such combinations (like 中美), as long as you let the reader/listener know which country you're referring to. The full ...


3

Another equivalent expression is 不要紧.


3

成熟点。 “别跟个小孩子似的,迟到了还撒谎。成熟点,坦率地跟老板讲怎么回事。”



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