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15

If it hangs (not responding to any input), you could say 我的电脑死机了。 If the screen blacks out, you could say 我的电脑黑屏了。 If it doesn't turn on, you could say 我的电脑不亮了。 or 我的电脑打不开了。 If it is completely broken and needs major repair, you could say 我的电脑坏了。 or 我的电脑完蛋了。 Note: All above are used in Mainland China. I know they're ...


13

酷!= "Cool!", transliteration from English 酷毙了!= "Cool to die for" (was a popular phrase in the 90s) 牛! = literally means bull, but here means "genius"; used to describe people only 他数学太牛了!He's so good at math! 这个杂技演员太牛了!The acrobat is so talented! 太棒了!= literally "Too great!", or "Fantastic!" 爸妈下周带我们去海边。Mom and Dad will take us to the ...


12

The most appropriate translation to make sense would probably be 有道理, which literally means has sense or reason. For example: 你说的有道理 What you said is reasonable / What you said makes sense. The phrase 说不通 would probably work, but it is not used frequently in Mainland China Mandrian(普通话) as 有道理 for the same context, if at all. As for 符合逻辑, the phrase ...


11

I think it is a terribly bad idea learning Mandarin by trying to map grammar from Western languages onto it. There is no such thing as countable nouns in Chinese, precisely because nouns do not have plurals. Conversely, you can make any noun ”countable” by adding a classifier to it: 你要一杯咖啡吗?


9

他很酷 (tā hěn kù) means "He is cool". This is a transliteration of "cool" using the sounds found in the Chinese language. I'm sure there are other ways to say it, but that is the most direct that I know of. 他很帅 (tā hěn shuài) is closer to "He is handsome". This could also be used to say someone is "cool-looking", I believe. 棒 (bàng) means great, awesome, ...


9

There are a few substitutes I can think of: 信任是要靠努力得来的 (trust is obtained through hard work) 信任是要争取的 (trust must be fought for) 信任是要赢得的 (trust must be won) 信任是要经营的 (trust needs to be maintained) 信任是要用时间去积累的 (trust is acquired over a period of time) If you are looking for a word, I think 争取[zhēngqǔ] is a good replacement for 赚 because it means to put in ...


9

灯笼 means lantern in the general sense, that is, a portable lighting device or mounted light fixture used to illuminate broad areas. The hot air balloon you described is 'sky lantern', which is called 天灯 (sky lantern) or 孔明灯 (Kongming Lantern) in Chinese.


8

欲 -- willing, want 速 -- speedy, quick 则 -- then, but 不 -- not, negative 达 -- arrive, done If you want to finish it quicker, then you probably can't get it done (correctly).


7

A few that are used the most in my surroundings: 好吧 (in a helpless tone) = Fine. 随便 = whatever. 都行 = whatever. 无所谓 = I don't care. 你说[X]就[X]吧 = If you say so.


7

It's 补丁. Like the English word "patch", this word can also mean "a piece of cloth used to cover holes in clothes when they get worn".


7

Alter words: 谢谢:多谢,感谢,谢恩(古代臣子百姓对君王说的) 对不起:抱歉,有愧,歉仄 As your case, 對不起現在才回覆您。 謝謝你的幫助! rephrase: (非常)抱歉现在才回复您。 (十分)感谢您的帮助!


7

You can translate 'moral' as 寓意 and thus 'have a moral' as '有寓意' (故事要有寓意). Alternatively, you could say 故事要有教育意义 (the story has to be educational).


7

You can use '表舅', because he is your mother's '表哥'. Basically I think there are three prefixes that you can add to relationship words: '亲' (directly/closely related, which is usually omitted), '堂', '表'. All your ancestors, siblings (that share at least father or mother with you), and descendant are '亲'. '堂' only refers to your father's brothers' children. ...


6

Well, avoid the exclamation mark. 請保持安靜! Please keep quiet! 安靜! Quiet! 小聲點! Lower your voice! 請小聲點! Please lower your voice! These from the above are a little commanding in tone, especially the second and third. You may change the tone by switching to a request rather than a command. 能否請你安靜 is relatively better. I usually go with ...


6

程序员 is widely used in China as “programmer”。


6

编程家 seems weird. You can say: 编程人员 程序员 程序猿 (for male) 程序媛 (for female) 码农 (junior programmer without future, often used for self-mockery) 挨踢(IT)民工 (similar to 码农)


6

In the scenario that a third party witnessed an insult of others two, or someone try to lighthearted fight back a insult, maybe "雷死了"(lei2 si3 le) in Chinese can fit in. "雷" means Thunder. "雷死了" means someone think it's somewhat funny unbelievable and be shocked. A longer version is "雷得外焦里嫩" (Lei2 De Wai4 Jiao1 Li3 Nen4), which means someone got attached ...


6

Yes, people use ‘kuài’ in conversation, as in ‘yī qiān duō kuài’ (over 1,000 NT$). You can also add ‘qián’ to make it clear you’re talking about amounts of money: ‘wŭ shí kuài qián’ (50 NT$). You might want to use ‘(xīn) tái bì’ when changing money, as in ‘qĭng gĕi wŏ tái bì’ (please give me Taiwan dollars). I don’t know what was used in previous ...


6

I can't recall any Chinese expressions used in the same way as calling out with 'Surprise!' in English. I guess the reason might be that Chinese Culture doesn't make Chinese people as playful as English Culture making its people. We say something different from 'surprise!' in similar cases: I bring a gift to a friend, before showing him/her the gift, I ...


5

Here is a full translation of your conversation. A: 我从没去过中国。 B: 你对中国文化有什么看法 A: 正如我说过的,我从没去过中国。 As you can see, "like I said" is "正如我说过的" in Chinese. A word-to-word translation would be "like" ⟶ "正如/就如/就像" I ⟶ "我" "said" ⟶ "说过的".


5

Although not a direct translation, "沒關係/没关系" or "沒問題/没问题" can also sometimes mean "don't worry" depending on context. 沒關係/没关系 - It doesn't matter (note: not suitable for the 2nd example) 沒問題/没问题 - No problems (ok for both examples)


5

In my experience, usually we say: 我的電腦當機了。 (My computer crashed.) or 我的電腦壞掉了。 (My computer is broken.) or 我的電腦不能用了。 (My computer can't be used anymore.) and I think people can understand when you just simply translate it 我的電腦死了。 (My computer died.) From Taiwan, but only from my experiences...


5

The general idea for this idiom is that there's no guarantee for (whatever matter you are referring to) to come to fruition yet, likely whatever it was hasn't even been started. No way. Another way of saying this in Chinese is "(事情)还没有眉目" The character 八 (eight) is written with 2 strokes, the first one is 撇 (to the left), and the second one is 捺 (to the ...


5

黑 is the verb you are looking for. 被黑了 is the common phrase form of "been hacked". If you feel 黑 is too ambiguous you can add an object behind it to turn it into a VO (verb object) phrase: 黑电脑, etc. Alternatively Oxford suggests: 5 COMPUTING, COLLOQUIAL 窃取 to hack secret data from computers 从计算机里窃取机密资料 Personally I would just go with ...


5

As many have said the "proper" way to refer to the currency of Taiwan is 新台币 (Xīn tái bì) which is literally broken down to 新 (Xīn) = New and 台币 (tái bì) = Taiwan Dollars Old Taiwan dollars are referred to as 舊臺幣* (旧台币) (jiù tái bì) However you would only refer to them by these proper names when dealing with multiple currencies. When referring to ...


5

Actually 金 and 柑 are both pronounced gam1 in Cantonese, according to Rita Mei-Wah Choy’s ‘Read and Write Chinese’. While it may be better to refer to Shantou as Chaozhou (潮州), I think CA55CE37 is onto something here. Indeed, in chaozhouhua 大橘/桔 (orange) and 大吉 (great luck) are apparently near homophones. A Thai source I have mentions this as well and ...


5

Chinese doesn't distinguish countable or uncountable. We have unit word in front of almost every noun.


5

The other answers are absolutely correct – it’s not smart to talk about countable and uncountable nouns in Chinese. However, like many languages, Chinese does have words that express abstract concepts or that are somehow inherently plural. How are these dealt with in a system where everything must be counted/measured? Here’s how one grammar explains it. ...


5

上调 is the most common equivalent. In your description you are using the wrong character (凋, the radical is different). EDIT: to add credibility to my answer and provide some examples, I have added some use cases. Some usages in abstracts: -- School of Life Sciences, Peking University: 上调巨噬细胞的一些信号分子 "upregulating some signaling molecules of ...


4

You can say: 当我年轻的时候,... 我年轻的时候,... 年轻的时候,... 年轻时,... In these cases, you are talking about the time when you were a young man (note: not a kid nor a teenager). Perhaps you are now in your 40s/50s/60s etc, and you are talking about your 20s/30s. You could also say: 当我年幼的时候,... 当我还小的时候,... 我年幼的时候,... 我还小的时候,... 我小时候,... ...



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