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9

I think it is a terribly bad idea learning Mandarin by trying to map grammar from Western languages onto it. There is no such thing as countable nouns in Chinese, precisely because nouns do not have plurals. Conversely, you can make any noun ”countable” by adding a classifier to it: 你要一杯咖啡吗?


9

灯笼 means lantern in the general sense, that is, a portable lighting device or mounted light fixture used to illuminate broad areas. The hot air balloon you described is 'sky lantern', which is called 天灯 (sky lantern) or 孔明灯 (Kongming Lantern) in Chinese.


6

Alter words: 谢谢:多谢,感谢,谢恩(古代臣子百姓对君王说的) 对不起:抱歉,有愧,歉仄 As your case, 對不起現在才回覆您。 謝謝你的幫助! rephrase: (非常)抱歉现在才回复您。 (十分)感谢您的帮助!


5

The other answers are absolutely correct – it’s not smart to talk about countable and uncountable nouns in Chinese. However, like many languages, Chinese does have words that express abstract concepts or that are somehow inherently plural. How are these dealt with in a system where everything must be counted/measured? Here’s how one grammar explains it. ...


5

Chinese doesn't distinguish countable or uncountable. We have unit word in front of almost every noun.


5

The general idea for this idiom is that there's no guarantee for (whatever matter you are referring to) to come to fruition yet, likely whatever it was hasn't even been started. No way. Another way of saying this in Chinese is "(事情)还没有眉目" The character 八 (eight) is written with 2 strokes, the first one is 撇 (to the left), and the second one is 捺 (to the ...


5

黑 is the verb you are looking for. 被黑了 is the common phrase form of "been hacked". If you feel 黑 is too ambiguous you can add an object behind it to turn it into a VO (verb object) phrase: 黑电脑, etc. Alternatively Oxford suggests: 5 COMPUTING, COLLOQUIAL 窃取 to hack secret data from computers 从计算机里窃取机密资料 Personally I would just go with ...


4

How about 霽光? As in the Song Dynasty poem: 一夕輕雷落萬絲,霽光浮瓦碧參差。("after a night's worth of distant thunder and myriad raindrops / then the light after the rain shines shimmeringly on the blue-green roof tiles") Not sure there's a single character for this but can check 康熙 (standard classical dictionary). 霽 as a single character refers to the clearing of ...


4

嘴馋 should be the one. 馋 in this case means piggish or greedy for food, particularly in a situation that one is not really hungry, but just wants something to be in the mouth for chewing.


3

In addition to 微, 微小, 极小/極小, you can also consider 渺小, 細小, 微型, 迷你. There are too many words/idioms for tiny, but these are the more common ones I can think of that are applicable in your context. Below is the explanation of each: 微 In the context you intend to use it in, 微 seems to be colloquial, e.g. 微翅膀, 微触角. Note that you should not say 微的翅膀 or 微的触角; ...


3

麻薯 or 麻糬 is the transcription of Japanese desert "Mochi/もち". The character 薯 means root vegetables. Most of time it will be potato. Some examples: 馬鈴薯 potato 蕃薯 sweet potato 木薯/樹薯 cassava


3

The translation of "they" depends on what it refers to. Use "他们" if you are talking about a group of people. Use "她们" if you are talking about a group of females. Note that if you are certain that they are a group of females you should always use "她们" instead of "他们". In comparison, if there is at least one male in the group of people, or if you don't know ...


3

What about: "Shoot!" "Shoot; it's raining." "Shoot; I forgot to bring my phone." "Shoot; I'm late." "Darn." "Darn, it's raining." "Darn! I forgot to bring my phone." "Darn; I'm late." "Oh no." "Oh no, it's raining." "Oh no. I forgot to bring my phone." "Oh no; I'm late." To emphasize that "astonishing strike," perhaps something like "Shoot, ...


3

As a native Chinese speaker, I think “我本想”,“我本以为”,“我本打算” are the answers to your questions. For example, your first sentence: I wish I could go to the movies tonight, but I have too much work to do. Translations could be: 我 本以为 我 今晚 能 去看电影,但 我 还有 非常多 的工作 要做。 Pay attention that it should be "本来以为", but we usually say “本以为” for short.


3

There are several options that clearly state that it cannot come true: I wish I could go to the movies tonight, but I have too much work to do. 我 本想(本来想要)今晚去看电影,但要做的事情太多了。 我 倒想(倒是想要)今晚去看电影,但要做的事情太多了。 I wish that I would have thought of that earlier. 我 真希望 我之前能想到,(现在说什么都晚了。) I wish I had bought this book at the beginning of the semester. 我 真希望 ...


2

There are three words corresponding to Mandarin "也" in Taiwanese Hokkien. 也 iā 亦 i̍k 嘛 mā I believe that in colloquial Hokkien, 也 is used exclusively in co-ordinated constructions, of the form "也 X 也 Y", which isn't what you want here. It is 嘛 that you're looking for.


2

I know what you mean, but for me, 希望 or 想 are natural and accurate words in Chinese when you explain "I wish". What confuses you in Chinese is the intonation we use you should pay more attention. What's different between Chinese and english is Chinese verbs don't have tense. Because of the intonation, one word in Chinese can have several different meanings. ...


2

You should use 您 in 謝謝你的幫助!, not 你 That will be more polite


2

This is where a few basic Chinese concepts come in handy: Spoken Mandarin is genderless, written Chinese has Gender expressed in the radicals Knowledge of radicals will tell you the appropriate Tā to use I like using yellowbridge.com for looking up etymology, stroke order, radicals, etc. for each character: ...


2

compare: 活禽 KEY {agriculture} live poultry vs. 鸡肉 KEY chicken (as food), chicken meat 鸭肉 ABC duck meat


2

模仿者 means imitator, which isn't necessarily negative, and is used more for behavior imitation instead of content crib, but I think it is fine to use for your case. For intellectual property plagiarism, the common words are 抄袭 (lit. copy and assault) and 剽窃 (lit. rob and steal). Both words are formal and strong but the latter one is even stronger. You can ...


2

当 is necessary here, it means work as; serve as; be. 有一天 他 会 当 医生 One day he will work as a doctor. As you see, without 当, the sentence does not make sense.


2

I am native speaker of Chinese. I guess "oh, no", "gosh", or "too bad" are OK.


2

This is my first post, I hope the community isn't too harsh on me >_<. I've come across some translations: The other posts are certainly correct in that "I wonder" is probably best translated as 我想知道 。。。 = I wonder ... 想知道(什么/为什么/如何) = I wonder (what/why/how) 不知道是否 = I wonder if/I wonder whether or not/I don't know if... But there are ...


1

山寨。 China is home to copycatters. 中国是山寨之乡。 Every innovation gets copycatted by China. 每个创新都被中国山寨。 In your example however, 抄袭 and 剽窃 are the most accurate.


1

Yes, there is a Chinese expression that almost perfectly matches the English one: 我该拿你怎么办 And it is used endearingly, or critically by superiors on inferiors. This also seems to match the English usage. I don't know about its etymology; from its close match against English and its contemporaneity (Ngram Viewer shows it appeared in the 80's and began to ...


1

I think the above answers are right. If you want to be VERY FORMAL in a written letter, you can use ancient expressions. Taiwanese still use them nowadays in formal letters. Ancient ways to express gratitude in written letter: ...


1

List your good points. Meaning instead of outright rejecting this person's offer, you say, "I already have such and such already," you get the picture. Emphasize that you are very well off, no need for gifts and such. So if someone offered a gift to you, you could say, "Thank you, but I have a lot of such and such." And the good ol' "I'm on a diet" works ...


1

"Damn!" "Hell!" "Crap!" These are pretty colloquial.



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