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9

I think it is a terribly bad idea learning Mandarin by trying to map grammar from Western languages onto it. There is no such thing as countable nouns in Chinese, precisely because nouns do not have plurals. Conversely, you can make any noun ”countable” by adding a classifier to it: 你要一杯咖啡吗?


6

I can't recall any Chinese expressions used in the same way as calling out with 'Surprise!' in English. I guess the reason might be that Chinese Culture doesn't make Chinese people as playful as English Culture making its people. We say something different from 'surprise!' in similar cases: I bring a gift to a friend, before showing him/her the gift, I ...


6

Yes, people use ‘kuài’ in conversation, as in ‘yī qiān duō kuài’ (over 1,000 NT$). You can also add ‘qián’ to make it clear you’re talking about amounts of money: ‘wŭ shí kuài qián’ (50 NT$). You might want to use ‘(xīn) tái bì’ when changing money, as in ‘qĭng gĕi wŏ tái bì’ (please give me Taiwan dollars). I don’t know what was used in previous ...


5

The general idea for this idiom is that there's no guarantee for (whatever matter you are referring to) to come to fruition yet, likely whatever it was hasn't even been started. No way. Another way of saying this in Chinese is "(事情)还没有眉目" The character 八 (eight) is written with 2 strokes, the first one is 撇 (to the left), and the second one is 捺 (to the ...


5

Actually 金 and 柑 are both pronounced gam1 in Cantonese, according to Rita Mei-Wah Choy’s ‘Read and Write Chinese’. While it may be better to refer to Shantou as Chaozhou (潮州), I think CA55CE37 is onto something here. Indeed, in chaozhouhua 大橘/桔 (orange) and 大吉 (great luck) are apparently near homophones. A Thai source I have mentions this as well and ...


5

As many have said the "proper" way to refer to the currency of Taiwan is 新台币 (Xīn tái bì) which is literally broken down to 新 (Xīn) = New and 台币 (tái bì) = Taiwan Dollars Old Taiwan dollars are referred to as 舊臺幣* (旧台币) (jiù tái bì) However you would only refer to them by these proper names when dealing with multiple currencies. When referring to ...


5

Chinese doesn't distinguish countable or uncountable. We have unit word in front of almost every noun.


5

The other answers are absolutely correct – it’s not smart to talk about countable and uncountable nouns in Chinese. However, like many languages, Chinese does have words that express abstract concepts or that are somehow inherently plural. How are these dealt with in a system where everything must be counted/measured? Here’s how one grammar explains it. ...


4

In my opinion, if you are adult and the person who droppd wallet is: younger than 11, you can call him or her "小朋友"; at the age of 11 to 18, you can call him or her "同学"; at the age of 18 to 24, you can call him "同学", "帅哥(cool man)", and call her "同学", "美女(beautiful girl)"; at the age of 24 to 35, you can call him "帅哥", and call her "美女"; older than 30, it ...


4

According to the Wikipedia article on bánh pía, which cites this source, pía comes from from the Teochew dialect (i.e., Chaozhouhua 潮州話): The Vietnamese name comes from the Theochew word for pastry, "pia" While I wouldn't necessarily consider this source to be authoritative, I looked up the Teochew pronunciation of 餅 here, and it is indeed pĩã so the ...


4

嘴馋 should be the one. 馋 in this case means piggish or greedy for food, particularly in a situation that one is not really hungry, but just wants something to be in the mouth for chewing.


3

What about: "Shoot!" "Shoot; it's raining." "Shoot; I forgot to bring my phone." "Shoot; I'm late." "Darn." "Darn, it's raining." "Darn! I forgot to bring my phone." "Darn; I'm late." "Oh no." "Oh no, it's raining." "Oh no. I forgot to bring my phone." "Oh no; I'm late." To emphasize that "astonishing strike," perhaps something like "Shoot, ...


3

Note that 啥子树子招啥虫 emphasizes more on similarity of couples of marriage. 龙生龙,凤生凤,老鼠儿子会打洞。 Dragon's son must be a dragon, phoenix's son must be a phoenix, and that of a mouse must can dig holes. Meaning: A great man teaches out great sons, a noble man cultivates noble sons. Normal people have only normal posterities. Sometimes we neglect the second half ...


3

There are several options that clearly state that it cannot come true: I wish I could go to the movies tonight, but I have too much work to do. 我 本想(本来想要)今晚去看电影,但要做的事情太多了。 我 倒想(倒是想要)今晚去看电影,但要做的事情太多了。 I wish that I would have thought of that earlier. 我 真希望 我之前能想到,(现在说什么都晚了。) I wish I had bought this book at the beginning of the semester. 我 真希望 ...


3

When you don't know the measure word, the safest choice is 个. It is the most common measure word, is used for things that do not have specific measure words, and can sometimes be used even if another measure word is used: ...


3

As a native Chinese speaker, I think “我本想”,“我本以为”,“我本打算” are the answers to your questions. For example, your first sentence: I wish I could go to the movies tonight, but I have too much work to do. Translations could be: 我 本以为 我 今晚 能 去看电影,但 我 还有 非常多 的工作 要做。 Pay attention that it should be "本来以为", but we usually say “本以为” for short.


3

麻薯 or 麻糬 is the transcription of Japanese desert "Mochi/もち". The character 薯 means root vegetables. Most of time it will be potato. Some examples: 馬鈴薯 potato 蕃薯 sweet potato 木薯/樹薯 cassava


3

The translation of "they" depends on what it refers to. Use "他们" if you are talking about a group of people. Use "她们" if you are talking about a group of females. Note that if you are certain that they are a group of females you should always use "她们" instead of "他们". In comparison, if there is at least one male in the group of people, or if you don't know ...


2

I know what you mean, but for me, 希望 or 想 are natural and accurate words in Chinese when you explain "I wish". What confuses you in Chinese is the intonation we use you should pay more attention. What's different between Chinese and english is Chinese verbs don't have tense. Because of the intonation, one word in Chinese can have several different meanings. ...


2

Many of them will actually use the English word, as weird as that sounds. This is true mostly with younger and more educated Chinese people. Here is a video of it actually being used in a very natural setting. Skip to 3:58. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqUpsXF4Yu8


2

Before the '90s, 同志 (comrade) was a popular term that was fine to call others, both man and woman. But after Hong Kongers started to use it for another meaning (gay/lesbian), we stopped using it most of the time. Now we can use 先生 (sir), 小伙子 (young fellow), 帅哥 (handsome man), 朋友 (mate), 小姐 (miss), 美女 (beauty).


2

I am native speaker of Chinese. I guess "oh, no", "gosh", or "too bad" are OK.


2

compare: 活禽 KEY {agriculture} live poultry vs. 鸡肉 KEY chicken (as food), chicken meat 鸭肉 ABC duck meat


2

This is where a few basic Chinese concepts come in handy: Spoken Mandarin is genderless, written Chinese has Gender expressed in the radicals Knowledge of radicals will tell you the appropriate Tā to use I like using yellowbridge.com for looking up etymology, stroke order, radicals, etc. for each character: ...


2

当 is necessary here, it means work as; serve as; be. 有一天 他 会 当 医生 One day he will work as a doctor. As you see, without 当, the sentence does not make sense.


1

"Damn!" "Hell!" "Crap!" These are pretty colloquial.


1

《周礼·冢人》疏,引《春秋纬》: 天子坟高三仞, 树以松; 诸侯半之, 树以柏; 大夫八尺, 树以药草; 士四尺, 树以槐。 This was the ancient regulations of tomb sizes and grave-tree species for different classes of the society.


1

I just find 成语, and they're not very good meaning 墓木已拱\墓木拱矣 [mù mù yǐ gǒng] 【发音】mù mù yǐ gǒng 【解释】坟墓上的树木已有两手合抱那么粗了。意思是你快要死了。这是骂人的话。后指人死了很久。 【出处】《左传·僖公三十二年》:“尔何知?中寿,尔墓之木拱亦。”


1

"eager" as in "he is always eager to participate in class activities".


1

i think proactive and enthusiastic are pretty good translations. you typically use 積極 to describe such qualities in a younger person who's eager to learn or do something but still humble to listen to advice, so it's not used a lot to comment on older people, though you can also use it to describe someone who's new to a role and wants to do a good job. e.g. a ...



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