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《周礼·冢人》疏,引《春秋纬》: 天子坟高三仞, 树以松; 诸侯半之, 树以柏; 大夫八尺, 树以药草; 士四尺, 树以槐。 This was the ancient regulations of tomb sizes and grave-tree species for different classes of the society.


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I just find 成语, and they're not very good meaning 墓木已拱\墓木拱矣 [mù mù yǐ gǒng] 【发音】mù mù yǐ gǒng 【解释】坟墓上的树木已有两手合抱那么粗了。意思是你快要死了。这是骂人的话。后指人死了很久。 【出处】《左传·僖公三十二年》:“尔何知?中寿,尔墓之木拱亦。”


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Note that 啥子树子招啥虫 emphasizes more on similarity of couples of marriage. 龙生龙,凤生凤,老鼠儿子会打洞。 Dragon's son must be a dragon, phoenix's son must be a phoenix, and that of a mouse must can dig holes. Meaning: A great man teaches out great sons, a noble man cultivates noble sons. Normal people have only normal posterities. Sometimes we neglect the second half ...


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"eager" as in "he is always eager to participate in class activities".


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i think proactive and enthusiastic are pretty good translations. you typically use 積極 to describe such qualities in a younger person who's eager to learn or do something but still humble to listen to advice, so it's not used a lot to comment on older people, though you can also use it to describe someone who's new to a role and wants to do a good job. e.g. a ...


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Maybe try be in for, have a passion for, have a strong inclination of, be used to , go into? (PS. It is my personal thought that western languages weigh verbs more than how Chinese does.) (PSS. Or are you just seeking some 'natural' expressions in English?) 他在课堂上举手发言不是很积极 He is not that used to expressing his ideas in classes. 他做事都很积极 ...


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积极 has two meanings positive This meaning is often used to describe abstract concepts such as 态度(attitude), 措施(steps, means) active Often used to describe doing things in a active, often with initiative or a self-motivated manner. As for your examples, the 积极 are used with the second meaning. 他在课堂上举手发言不是很积极 He is not very active in raising his ...


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I think active is ok for the examples you took. Active is used to emphasize that someone is taking action in order to achieve something, rather than just hoping for it or achieving it in an indirect way.


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The very native Chinese word of 'Surprise!' which every Chinese can understand is "我操!", and you need to speak it aloud. And to express the following mood after an surprise, you can say "真鸡巴XX" in which XX is an adjective, like "big, hard, hot, strong, sexual, pretty, good..." So the whole sentence, for example, would be like that: "我操! 真鸡巴硬"


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Many of them will actually use the English word, as weird as that sounds. This is true mostly with younger and more educated Chinese people. Here is a video of it actually being used in a very natural setting. Skip to 3:58. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqUpsXF4Yu8


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I can't recall any Chinese expressions used in the same way as calling out with 'Surprise!' in English. I guess the reason might be that Chinese Culture doesn't make Chinese people as playful as English Culture making its people. We say something different from 'surprise!' in similar cases: I bring a gift to a friend, before showing him/her the gift, I ...


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According to the Wikipedia article on bánh pía, which cites this source, pía comes from from the Teochew dialect (i.e., Chaozhouhua 潮州話): The Vietnamese name comes from the Theochew word for pastry, "pia" While I wouldn't necessarily consider this source to be authoritative, I looked up the Teochew pronunciation of 餅 here, and it is indeed pĩã so the ...



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