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8

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/duang-how-jackie-chan-helped-780040 Citation, with explanation of the word in bold: Think that your hair is looking particularly good today? In Chinese popular culture, it's looking "duang." A Chinese phrase that came out of nowhere, "duang" has taken the Internet by storm, even though many don't really ...


8

@OmniBus "those modern fonts are terrible and distinct nothing"—you may despise modern fonts all you like, but when you pick up any calligraphy collection (書法字典) you will find abundant evidence that you'll have to extend your despisal to such names like 王羲之, 歐陽詢, 唐太宗 and so on, as they did not make those distinctions. Also, where the typographic distinction ...


7

In Cantonese, 先生 can be shortened to 生 when attached to a family name. It is used for adult male, all ages and is used orally, not written.


6

生 Short for 先生 in Cantonese 先生 is gender neutral in Chinese, however most people use it as the Chinese version of "Mr." Profession that is associated with 先生 is teachers (still used very often in the 80s and 90s. But thanks to the Communists such elegant term is abolished and people have started to call teachers as 老師 even in Cantonese). So if your Chinese ...


6

"fighter jet" is something originally from an ad that was popular many years ago: 波导手机,手机中的战斗机 The ad aims to emphasize the extent to which their cell phones are more superior than others (fighter jets are much faster than normal jets). It had repeated many times for a long period, so many people got to know it very well. Since then, "fighter jet" is also ...


6

No. Chinese writing certainly has an early origin in logograms, but so does the Latin alphabet we use – the "A" is actually an ox head, tilted 90 degrees, and borrowed from the first Sumerian cuneiform script. Since classical times, only a few percent of the Chinese language retains such logograms, while the vast majority (+90%) of characters are phonetic ...


5

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ModL1vD1A7U It means cool, damn or whatever you want it to mean. Informally, the character is 成 over 龙, that is after the innovator.


5

"Q: Are there large discrepancies between what Chinese consider to be words?" No. It is very clear what is a word and what not. A word can consist of one or more characters. Thus, a single character can be either a word by itself or is part of a polysyllabic word. Like in every other existing language, a word does officially either exist or not. Q: Do ...


5

上 as a verb could mean "go to" (i.e. could be replaced with 去 without change in meanings) and "ascend/board" which could be understand as go up onto since the floor of vehicles are generally higher and require a upward movement. Anyway, in phrases such as 上卧室, 上 just means "go to". In 上厕所, 上 could mean "go to", but more often it contains the meaning of ...


4

耳光 ABC N. box on the ears; slap on the face 巴掌 N. palm of the hand While they are inherently different, 打…巴掌 and 打…耳光 are roughly the same. Consider these two example sentences from A Chinese-English Dictionary 打他一巴掌 dǎ tā yī bāzhang give him a slap 打耳光 dǎ ěrguāng slap sb.'s face; box sb.'s ears ...


4

Today over at LanguageLog, I came across this sentence: 台灣經驗不僅是對其他開發中國家的一種啟發,更是台灣免於赤化的最佳保障。 Inadvertently, when scanning that phrase I ran down a gardenpath (yes, that's what linguists call it: a fruitless attempt that turns out to be the wrong choice, so you have to back up). Turns out it's not 開發 中國(家) *"develop China's (state)??", but, rather, 開發中 國家 ...


3

Did some research, but all I can find is that both 左 and 右 are actually the same symbol that denotes hand but reversed horizontally in ancient times. This symbol basically formed the top part of the character, which now pointed at same direction. When I was in kindergarten, my teach used to help us to remember them by telling us 右 has a 口 in it, so it's the ...


3

上 and 下, the original meaning is up and down, as adverbs. They are very frequently used as verb. (1) The original meaning, for example, 上山砍柴,下河捞鱼。 (2) The social level, for example, 上得了厅堂,下得了厨房。 (3) The begin and end, for example, 上课,下课,上车,下车。 (4) The geometric sense as in map, for example, 北上,南下。 (5) To participate, for example, ...


3

Following what 倪阔乐 mentioned, here is a helpful visualization for how the newly formed pseudo-character looks like:


3

First, it is not a standard way. Apparently, it is a complain. 失~lose, 戀~love。失戀~fall out of love. The word itself has a vt+noun structure. Try to understand it from the basic form: 為什麼我失戀了?Why I fell out of love? One can definitely add adj to a noun(戀). (just for explanation.) 為什麼我失(全世界的)戀? Now add adv to vt(失). (just for explanation.) ...


3

Yes, in Mandarin there is this meaning "when" for "多早晚". But the saying "多早晚" is not common. You could possibly hear this in northern China. It's colloquial. It's not surprising that your Singapore friend never heard of it.


3

Looks like classical Chinese. zdic ◎ 多早晚 duōzǎowǎn [when] 多咱,什么时候(“多咱”来于“多早晚”) 多早晚 什麼時候。紅樓夢.第十四回:「我且問你,你們這夜書多早晚纔念呢?」或作「多早」、「多咱」、「多咱晚」、「多偺」、「多喒」。 甚晚、很晚。 百度百科 中文名 多早晚 外文名 Much sooner or later 性质 词语 来源 红楼梦 多早晚 duōzǎowǎn [when] 多咱,什么时候(“多咱”来于“多早晚”) 《红楼梦》第六四回:“黛玉道:‘可是你没的说了!好好的,我多早晚又伤心了?’” ...


3

You can only detect word boundaries by the context and your vocabulary. If you don't know words many enough or the situation at hand much enough, there isn't much other way to ensure you understand the things correctly. The reason that Chinese doesn't have word boundaries is that there are "character boundaries". In English, the basic unit of the lexicon, ...


2

yes. but this case it's an inversion of 失戀


2

左 looks like it has an "I" in it. I in the alphabet is closer to L (left obviously) 右 looks like it has an "O" in it. O in the alphabet is closer to R (right obviously)


2

I learned it had something to do with what you do with your hands, the only one I can recall right now is how I differentiate: When you are working (工) you hold a ruler in left hand and draw with your right.


2

If you're a bricklayer you hold your square bricks in your right hand, you hold a level or ruler in your left. The 口 is your brick, the 工 is your level. Cheers, -dlj.


2

胄 (由 + 月) means descendants, whereas 冑 (a different character, 由 + 冃) means helmet. Since they look similar, they got merged. 华胄 means either of Han lineage or of noble descent. There is no word 华冑, which would mean Chinese helmet.


2

As a Chinese with a graduate degree, I claim I have never seen that word before. But I can guess that it literally means a humorous imitation. There is no specific context I can give you. (谐) humor (仿) imitate


2

The story as far as I can tell is that 戲仿 is the original Chinese term for this sort of literary game. The practice was not that common, but it was not unheard of either. The mid-Qing novel 鏡花緣 has a whole chapter describing games involving complicated parodies (chapter 87: 因舊事游戲仿楚詞 即美景詼諧編月令). The games involved a lot of drinking, and I had a lot of ...


2

百度:谐仿是指对原作品的嘲弄, baidu: 谐仿 is at original work make fun of, parody is pretty good!


2

These below are not exactly embarassing, but nonetheless funny words that have different meanings when pronounced with different tones. 看書 (read book) kàn shū / 砍樹 (chuck wood) kǎn shù 湯水 (soup) tāng shuǐ / 糖水 (syrup/sweet soup) táng shuǐ 號碼 (number) hào mǎ / 好嗎 (okay?) hǎo ma 大人 (adult) dàrén / 打人 (beat somebody) dǎ rén 火車 (train) huǒchē / 貨車 (truck) ...


2

I'm from the northeast of China. At first, I'm surprised to learn that, "多早晚" means "when". Finally I find out that, in my home town, people usually pronounce it as "多咱"(duō zǎn)to mean "when" , and I've never known the exactly written characters of that phrase till I see this question. And I should say, I have NEVER saw this phrase in formal written ...


1

To best understand the meaning of a word, it's best to first understand the context in which it is used. 意 can generally mean idea, concept, meaning, thought, to think, wish, intention, will, to expect, to anticipate, etc. which is quite a lot! Also, 意 is not usually used singly. It is most often used together with another word, which probably helps add ...


1

As a side note, "青" is not simply cyan in old Chinese text. It is a collective term, which may be 綠 (green),藍 (blue),碧 (light-er blue),蒼 (deep-er blue),or even 黑 (black). For example, "青出於藍" means that the dye "青" (indigo) is produced using plant called "靛藍". On the other hand, "青衣" is clothes of dark color in general. That explains why they say "中國黑青通用" ...



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