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seen Nov 16 '12 at 8:40

Nov
2
comment Academic explanation for rhyming fillers with irrelevant meaning in doggerel
For the syllable filling part, 衬词 inserted words in most folk songs is worth discussion, too.
Oct
25
comment How to translate/use 一巧
我的一巧 is an inspiring reconstruction. +1 for the awesome imagination.
Oct
10
comment Different names for each of the fingers
FYI, as noted in douban.com/note/237019298, 无名指 anonymous finger (literally) comes from Sanskrit अनामिका Anamika, which also derived the Latin word anonymus, and languages such as Finnish, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Persian, Russian, Ukrainian, Chinese and Japanese all share the same nomenclature.
Oct
10
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
个 suits most nouns, but not all. 一个人 is perfect, 一个房子 not perfect yet acceptable, but *一个猫 sounds weird.
Oct
10
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
@HagenvonEitzen There is no such thing like classifier changing in Chinese. In a consistent context you should always use the same classifier for the same noun (otherwise it seems weird). And Chinese nouns don't reflect, in other words, they remain the same almost all the time.
Oct
10
comment How to say “I live at the bottom of a hill”?
For me 我住在山脚下 is OK and natural enough. To sound more colloquial I would say 我住在山边上 I live beside a hill.
Oct
8
comment Is there a Chinese WordNet?
@Szabolcs The site has not been updated since 2010. Plus, to download the db you need to apply for a permission. I doubt whether they'll still have a look at the online applications :(
Oct
7
comment What's the difference between 証 and 證?
+1 for the 東東錯別字詞典 link, yet IMHO the few examples you've mentioned are wrong not because of the 証 in them, but other unacceptable character replacements, so you can be confident in your original conclusion -- 証 can be used interchangeably with 證 in all modern usage cases.
Oct
4
comment What are some ways that I can be self-deprecating about my Chinese speaking ability?
@NS.X. Self-deprecating when someone compliments you on something is a proper Chinese way to show politeness.
Oct
3
comment Understanding the meaning of 让 in this sentence
Well could you please further clarify the nuance between the two possible translations (since I'm too confused to see how one differs from the other)? Do you mean "I can get them to ... (possibly by persuasion)" for the 1st one and "I can offer them the service ... (and let them know about my offering)" for the 2nd?