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seen Aug 2 '13 at 16:20

Jul
8
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Dec
21
awarded  Yearling
Aug
2
accepted When should you use 尽管 (jǐnguǎn) instead of 虽然 (suīrán)?
Dec
21
awarded  Yearling
Apr
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
14
comment How are new words added to the Chinese language?
I'd argue that in the end it's the people who decide. Governments can try to regulate languages but it's almost impossible to tell people what words to use. At best, people may use official government-sanctioned words in official/business communication and the words that are actually popular in their daily lives. Regulation would seem especially difficult for new terms as people will pick their favourites and would find it a bother to use a dry, government-issued new word for the same concept.
Jan
14
asked 零售 - Why is the character for “zero” used in the Chinese word for retail?
Jan
14
comment Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
It is an interesting question. However, there may not be a real answer since the Chinese spoken language is difficult to trace back through time owing to the complete lack of a phonetic transcription method. This makes it extremely difficult to determine how any given word or character was pronounced in a given region at a given time (and of course the further back you go the more difficult it becomes). This also makes it difficult to research how sinitic languages interacted with other language groups in the distant past.
Jan
13
comment When should you use 尽管 (jǐnguǎn) instead of 虽然 (suīrán)?
Thanks for the suggestions above. I'm afraid they're not of any help to me (as my English keyboard layout is not a US one and external programs add a step which is rather cumbersome) but they may well be of use to others!
Jan
13
comment Correct terms for a roadside gutter and gutter on a roof
Regional variation could be an explanation. Perhaps it could also be explained by formal/technical versus colloquial use, where people have come to use 屋檐 as a synonym for 檐沟 in daily speech.
Jan
12
awarded  Quorum
Jan
11
comment Correct terms for a roadside gutter and gutter on a roof
Thanks Huang, that perfectly clears up the nuances between the two terms.
Jan
11
comment Correct terms for a roadside gutter and gutter on a roof
I also came across 地沟. Do you know how 地沟 differs from 排水沟? Do they mean the same thing or are there subtle differences between the two?
Jan
11
comment Correct terms for a roadside gutter and gutter on a roof
I googled (image search) for 檐沟 and 天沟; the results show that these words indeed refer to a gutter. An image search for 排水沟 returns all manner of storm drains (also the ones lining streets), which seems to be exactly what the OP is after.
Jan
11
comment Correct terms for a roadside gutter and gutter on a roof
After looking up 屋檐 I get the impression this is not what the OP is after. 屋檐 seems to mean "eaves" rather than "gutter". 阴沟 seems to me best translated as "sewer". Just for your information, the grated inlet on a street you referred to (排水沟) can be called a "storm drain" in English.
Jan
10
comment What does 糗大 (qiǔdà) mean?
@Alenanno - No absolute need but if the OP does make a new post that already includes the definition of 糗大 it could help to keep this site tidy as this post could then potentially become a partial duplicate post. Of course it remains up to the OP as we are still in the beta stage now.
Jan
10
comment What does 糗大 (qiǔdà) mean?
Perhaps you could delete your question and post a new question asking the origin of 糗大 (which would be interesting to know, in my opinion). In the question you could also define the meaning of 糗大 so that beginners will be benefited by reading your question as well. Just my suggestion.
Jan
10
accepted What are the differences between 男女, 公母, and 雄雌?
Jan
9
comment Number two in chinese: 二 vs 两
Yes, it means 14:00. I've edited a bit more to make the numbering internally consistent with the content.