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Aug
25
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
18
asked Words for shopping for medicine for athlete's foot in mainland China?
Aug
17
comment Could saying “慢慢吃” to a stranger cause offence?
@Ming: That's true. Definitely in the US the waitstaff say it. Some of us sometimes like to say "bon appetit" - it's fun for some reason. But we don't know French so we generally pronounce the final "t". But yeah otherwise we might say "let's eat", "dig in", "tuck in", or a bunch of more colloquial variations. Especially if it's a bigger informal group or family get-together. Also, we're used to foreigners saying "enjoy your meal" even if we don't say it ourselves.
Aug
16
accepted Is “谐仿” an actual word in Chinese?
Aug
16
revised Is “谐仿” an actual word in Chinese?
link to wiktionary
Aug
16
comment Could saying “慢慢吃” to a stranger cause offence?
@hello_harry77: It's not usual in English but sometimes I do it for fun - a bit of random unexpected politeness to a stranger sometimes breaks the ice.
Aug
16
asked Is “谐仿” an actual word in Chinese?
Aug
16
comment Could saying “慢慢吃” to a stranger cause offence?
@o.k.w: Usually not OK??
Aug
16
comment When should I use “很” before an adjective?
@Claw: Actually I think the one NS.X. suggested gave me more of what I was looking for, but I'm a slow reader and still going through the one you suggested...
Aug
16
revised Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
more english pronunciation/spacing tweaks
Aug
16
comment Could saying “慢慢吃” to a stranger cause offence?
Sometimes I say it when I walk in a room and somebody is eating a snack. Is this OK too?
Aug
16
revised Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
fix missing spaces around punctuation in english context
Aug
16
comment Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
@AlexD: Chinese is more flexible in this regard than English but English is more flexible in this regard than most other languages of Europe. All of the "monosyllabic" languages of East and Southeast Asia that I know a little abut seem to have this quality (Khmer, Lao, Thai, Vietnamese). Also in Polynesian languages such as Hawaiian and Maori.
Aug
16
comment Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
It's extremely common across languages for adjectives to be a kind of verb, and happens in most Asian languages I know something about. Across European languages it's more common for adjectives to be closely akin to nouns. (Japanese is an interesting case since it has both kinds.)
Aug
16
comment What character is 刄 + 点?
The description "刄 + 点" had me totally baffled. But the unusual character still stood out enough (-:
Aug
16
answered Teaching Pinyin and Characters together vs Teaching Pinyin then Characters
Aug
16
asked When should I use “很” before an adjective?
Aug
16
comment When “to be” should be used? When omitted?
You never use before an adjective as Chinese adjectives are also verbs so "good" also means "to be good". Often seems to take the place of "to be" before an adjective though. I don't know if there are other words besides that can do this or how and why and when it works and doesn't work.
Aug
16
revised Could saying “慢慢吃” to a stranger cause offence?
请慢用
Aug
16
comment Could saying “慢慢吃” to a stranger cause offence?
Just on a sidenote, we don't really say "enjoy your meal" in English, though English-teaching courses always seem to include it.