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bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Naha-shi, Japan
age
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Apr 14 at 6:35

big pale blue box


Apr
14
comment Tool which can convert web pages from Hanzi to either Pinyin or Zhuyin Fuhao
As I tried to make clear in the question, "For the purposes of this question I'm only asking about full-page conversion please". Apologies if I failed to make it clear enough.
Mar
30
revised How to use 如 to make comparisons or analogies
new comparison tag
Mar
30
revised Using 比 (bǐ) for comparison
new comparison tag
Mar
30
revised How to say “I prefer x over y”?
new comparison tag
Mar
30
comment How to say “I prefer x over y”?
Actually in English we don't say this anyway. We would say "I prefer eating fried rice to fried chicken." or "I prefer eating fried rice over fried chicken."
Mar
26
comment Is there a limited character set for European loanwords?
@user58955: I think transliteration is most common for the names of world figures, for example when new presidents and prime ministers appear in distant countries who haven't been in the news before.
Mar
26
comment Is there a limited character set for European loanwords?
@AndrewGrimm: I assume at least some must have. That might be a good question to ask either on linguistics.SE or japanese.SE (-:
Mar
26
comment What is the best way to learn tones?
@NS.X.: It might give readers different impressions of that tone depending on what variety of English they speak.
Mar
25
comment What is the best way to learn tones?
Also note that "student" might not be a good example as people not from North America pronounce it like "styudent".
Mar
25
awarded  Civic Duty
Mar
25
comment In pinyin, why is there an inconsistency between bo, po, suo, duo etc
@MikeChamberlain: Actually 'o' in English has several sounds: It's really different in "h**o**t" and "g**o**". The sound in "b**ough**t" is also a kind of 'o', though it always has more complicated spelling. Another problem is that the 'o' in "hot" is pronounced really differently between North America and other English-speaking countries, and in fact even within them!
Mar
25
comment Can native Chinese speakers distinguish tones in songs?
+1 for the link to the paper!
Mar
25
comment What is the best way to learn tones?
The easy part is learning the tones in isolation. The hard part is learning how to perceive or produce the tones right for whole phrases and sentences.
Mar
25
comment What is the best way to learn tones?
I'd be surprised if anybody who didn't already know the tones could learn much from the description of 1st tone here. Lots of people find it to be quite like a musical note, I am among them. I don't find the description of 4th tone convincing either. But the others are good. +1 for the sentences at the end though!
Mar
25
comment What is the best way to learn tones?
2nd tone should be the easiest if you are a speaker of any non-tonal language since just about every language that doesn't have tones uses rising intonation at the end of a question, and this is the tone of Mandarin 2nd tone.
Mar
25
comment Is there a limited character set for European loanwords?
By the way, why are you specifying traditional characters? Are you only interested in Taiwan or only interested in older Chinese usage before simplification in the '50s-'60s? I guess you might actually be interested in words of this sort that went on to be borrowed into Japanese too?
Mar
25
revised Is there a limited character set for European loanwords?
transliteration tag
Mar
25
comment Is there a limited character set for European loanwords?
I believe there are several "standard" sets of characters to be used for transliterating from various languages into Chinese. There's more than one because different languages have different sounds and none of them map very directly onto Chinese sounds. But not all transliterations use these, especially for proper nouns, trademarks, etc. Also I don't know when they date from so there could be words from before the current set of "standard" transliteration tables too. I further believe most of these "standard" characters are rare outside transliterations.
Mar
21
revised In pinyin, why is there an inconsistency between bo, po, suo, duo etc
copyedit english spelling and usage
Mar
21
comment In pinyin, why is there an inconsistency between bo, po, suo, duo etc
I thought they had a different sound too, but I didn't feel confident after reading the first comments and my difficulties outlined in my answer. I also no longer have any Chinese speakers nearby to consult.