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Jul
23
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
The Cantonese pronunciation is actually heoi, not keoi. A lot of words that historically had the /kʰ/ initial ended up having an /h/initial in Cantonese.
Jul
22
reviewed Looks OK Clash of brothers?
Jul
22
reviewed No Action Needed Clash of brothers?
Jul
22
reviewed No Action Needed Proper way to use sentence-final particles (like 啦 or 喽) in spoken Chinese
Jul
22
reviewed Looks OK Chinese words for “everything can be viewed from a positive side”
Jul
21
reviewed No Action Needed Hong Kong Cantonese variations
Jul
21
comment What is the meaning of 么?
@user3306356 Good catch! That's the way it was written in the source and I hadn't even notice it when I copied the excerpt. It probably is a typo.
Jul
21
revised What is the meaning of 么?
Minor copyedit + cranberry morpheme
Jul
21
answered What is the meaning of 么?
Jul
20
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
Can you clarify what you mean by "REAL" character? Do you mean the etymologically correct character for the kei pronunciation? While I don't know Sichuanese, I wouldn't be surprised if 去 was the etymologically correct character for this pronunciation, especially since 去 historically was pronounced with a /kʰ/ initial.
Jul
20
revised Does Cantonese have a falling tone?
Minor copyedit
Jul
20
answered Does Cantonese have a falling tone?
Jul
17
reviewed Reviewed How many characters do I need to learn?
Jul
13
reviewed Looks OK How to say “That looks delicious”
Jul
13
reviewed Close Chinese/English/Pinyin Books For Young Adult Readers
Jul
13
comment Correct/natural way to say “在我的咖啡可以加糖吗?”
@user11315 Regarding the specific use of 可以 in your original question, part of the unnaturalness is due it being the direct translation from the English 'can/could'. English speakers tend to make requests by asking whether something can or could be done, with the implication that the receiver would go ahead and perform the request if it was possible. Chinese speakers tend to be more to the point, and simply ask the receiver to do it for them. 请 (please), 帮我 (help me), or 麻烦你 (to trouble you) are often used to make it clearer that it's a request rather than a demand.
Jul
13
comment 解 Read as Jiai?
@wpt I don't think the -h designates 入聲. The character 姐, for instance, is not a 入聲 word. It appears Matthews uses a modified Wade-Giles romanization and -ieh is simply the spelling that Wade-Giles uses to represent the same sound as Pinyin's -ie (see here). Thus, Matthews' chieh = Pinyin jie.
Jul
13
reviewed Looks OK Sheep or goat? 一只羊跑过来
Jul
7
comment Were 蒸 and 祯 homonyms?
According to * Lexicon of Reconstructed Pronunciation* by Edwin Pulleyblank, the -ŋ (-ng) final is present during the Yuan era as well (tʂiŋ), so the change to -n is a more recent change. To compare, modern Cantonese still retains the -ŋ final, and both 蒸 and 祯 are homophones in Cantonese.
Jul
6
reviewed Looks OK Differences between 滑鼠 (huá shŭ) and 鼠标 (shŭ biāo)