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Oct
23
comment Does this sentence sound natural?
@viktorahlström My comment was addressing your previous question regarding do you rather than your new question (which should really be posed as a new question rather than a comment here). Regarding your new question, no, it is still not correct. Again, don't try to literally translate word-for-word, because grammatical structures in Chinese and English can be quite different. For one, Chinese does not exhibit wh-movement, so 多少 should not be moved to the front of the question. Also, because it is not a yes/no question, 吗 should not be used.
Oct
23
comment Does this sentence sound natural?
@viktorahlström It doesn't make sense to translate do you literally because the use of the word do as a dummy auxiliary verb is something that applies only in English grammar (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do-support). Most other languages do not introduce this verb when forming questions; rather the syntax changes occur with the original verb. In the case of Chinese, it can be via the addition of a sentence final or the use of the <verb>不<verb> construction.
Oct
15
comment In which ways can I express “to make s.o. jump” ?
There's also 令, which is used similarly to 使, but with a slightly stronger connotation of being compelled.
Oct
7
comment Do Cantonese 畀 and Mandarin 被 have any historical connection?
@Alex My examples showed how the meaning of "to give" very fluidly morphs into the passive construction by the last two examples, which parallel the structure of the sentence given by the OP. This is why I raised the question of whether 俾 and 畀 are really distinct words in the first place.
Oct
7
comment Do Cantonese 畀 and Mandarin 被 have any historical connection?
@Alex While I've seen the prescription that bei2 should be written 俾 when used as a passive marker and 畀 when used to mean 'to give', it's not clear that they are actually distinct words, because there is a continuum of meaning between the two. Take the following examples: 我畀啲嘢你做 "I give you things to do" > 我搵啲嘢畀你做 "I find things for you (i.e., to give to you) to do" > 啲嘢畀你做 "Things are given to you to do" or "Things are to be done by you" > 啲嘢畀你做咗 "Things were done by you"
Oct
7
comment Do Cantonese 畀 and Mandarin 被 have any historical connection?
Do you have any sources? I was always under the impression that the use of 被 as a passive marker in modern Chinese was a simply a phonetic loan (假借字) and not actually related to its original meaning of 'to cover'.
Aug
20
comment Confusion when words are combined
possible duplicate of Is there a rule that tells what characters can be omitted?
Aug
16
comment When “to be” should be used? When omitted?
possible duplicate of Why is (是) shi4 dropped in this sentence:"我很好"?
Aug
15
comment What character is 刄 + 点?
I will note that it does look like the left-hand component of , which is noted as being , which is a variant of . The similarity appears only to be superficial though and is unrelated to its usage as a variant of 两 though.
Aug
14
comment What character is 刄 + 点?
I couldn't find it in Unicode.
Jul
24
comment Character 瞓: where did the pronunciations come from?
I haven't had the chance to look into this yet, but will provide an update once I've done so. You could also pose this in its own question so that others can chime in.
Jul
23
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
@StumpyJoePete I mentioned other examples in my answer here: chinese.stackexchange.com/a/10764/166 However, I hadn't looked further into the pattern of which ones remained /kʰ/. At a cursory glance it seems like most of them became /h/ (or eventually /f/ in the case of /kʰu/), though there are a few that didn't. Many words that have the /kʰ/ initial in Cantonese currently actually evolved from other initials, such as /g/.
Jul
23
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
The Cantonese pronunciation is actually heoi, not keoi. A lot of words that historically had the /kʰ/ initial ended up having an /h/initial in Cantonese.
Jul
21
comment What is the meaning of 么?
@user3306356 Good catch! That's the way it was written in the source and I hadn't even notice it when I copied the excerpt. It probably is a typo.
Jul
20
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
Can you clarify what you mean by "REAL" character? Do you mean the etymologically correct character for the kei pronunciation? While I don't know Sichuanese, I wouldn't be surprised if 去 was the etymologically correct character for this pronunciation, especially since 去 historically was pronounced with a /kʰ/ initial.
Jul
13
comment Correct/natural way to say “在我的咖啡可以加糖吗?”
@user11315 Regarding the specific use of 可以 in your original question, part of the unnaturalness is due it being the direct translation from the English 'can/could'. English speakers tend to make requests by asking whether something can or could be done, with the implication that the receiver would go ahead and perform the request if it was possible. Chinese speakers tend to be more to the point, and simply ask the receiver to do it for them. 请 (please), 帮我 (help me), or 麻烦你 (to trouble you) are often used to make it clearer that it's a request rather than a demand.
Jul
13
comment 解 Read as Jiai?
@wpt I don't think the -h designates 入聲. The character 姐, for instance, is not a 入聲 word. It appears Matthews uses a modified Wade-Giles romanization and -ieh is simply the spelling that Wade-Giles uses to represent the same sound as Pinyin's -ie (see here). Thus, Matthews' chieh = Pinyin jie.
Jul
7
comment Were 蒸 and 祯 homonyms?
According to * Lexicon of Reconstructed Pronunciation* by Edwin Pulleyblank, the -ŋ (-ng) final is present during the Yuan era as well (tʂiŋ), so the change to -n is a more recent change. To compare, modern Cantonese still retains the -ŋ final, and both 蒸 and 祯 are homophones in Cantonese.
Jun
17
comment Characters for Taiwanese
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post.
Jun
5
comment 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
@ZbigniewAdamowicz By stand-in, he means it's a phonetic loan (假借字). 說 and 悦 had very similar pronunciations in Old Chinese (reconstructed as *l̥ot vs. *lot, respectively), so before the 悦 character was invented, 說 was often used for both meanings.