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Jul
24
comment Character 瞓: where did the pronunciations come from?
I haven't had the chance to look into this yet, but will provide an update once I've done so. You could also pose this in its own question so that others can chime in.
Jul
23
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
@StumpyJoePete I mentioned other examples in my answer here: chinese.stackexchange.com/a/10764/166 However, I hadn't looked further into the pattern of which ones remained /kʰ/. At a cursory glance it seems like most of them became /h/ (or eventually /f/ in the case of /kʰu/), though there are a few that didn't. Many words that have the /kʰ/ initial in Cantonese currently actually evolved from other initials, such as /g/.
Jul
23
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
The Cantonese pronunciation is actually heoi, not keoi. A lot of words that historically had the /kʰ/ initial ended up having an /h/initial in Cantonese.
Jul
21
comment What is the meaning of 么?
@user3306356 Good catch! That's the way it was written in the source and I hadn't even notice it when I copied the excerpt. It probably is a typo.
Jul
20
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
Can you clarify what you mean by "REAL" character? Do you mean the etymologically correct character for the kei pronunciation? While I don't know Sichuanese, I wouldn't be surprised if 去 was the etymologically correct character for this pronunciation, especially since 去 historically was pronounced with a /kʰ/ initial.
Jul
13
comment Correct/natural way to say “在我的咖啡可以加糖吗?”
@user11315 Regarding the specific use of 可以 in your original question, part of the unnaturalness is due it being the direct translation from the English 'can/could'. English speakers tend to make requests by asking whether something can or could be done, with the implication that the receiver would go ahead and perform the request if it was possible. Chinese speakers tend to be more to the point, and simply ask the receiver to do it for them. 请 (please), 帮我 (help me), or 麻烦你 (to trouble you) are often used to make it clearer that it's a request rather than a demand.
Jul
13
comment 解 Read as Jiai?
@wpt I don't think the -h designates 入聲. The character 姐, for instance, is not a 入聲 word. It appears Matthews uses a modified Wade-Giles romanization and -ieh is simply the spelling that Wade-Giles uses to represent the same sound as Pinyin's -ie (see here). Thus, Matthews' chieh = Pinyin jie.
Jul
7
comment Were 蒸 and 祯 homonyms?
According to * Lexicon of Reconstructed Pronunciation* by Edwin Pulleyblank, the -ŋ (-ng) final is present during the Yuan era as well (tʂiŋ), so the change to -n is a more recent change. To compare, modern Cantonese still retains the -ŋ final, and both 蒸 and 祯 are homophones in Cantonese.
Jun
17
comment Characters for Taiwanese
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post.
Jun
5
comment 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
@ZbigniewAdamowicz By stand-in, he means it's a phonetic loan (假借字). 說 and 悦 had very similar pronunciations in Old Chinese (reconstructed as *l̥ot vs. *lot, respectively), so before the 悦 character was invented, 說 was often used for both meanings.
Jun
3
comment A Complex Chinese Character
possible duplicate of An unknown Traditional Chinese character on a decorative piece for Lunar New Year
Jun
3
comment “Thank you” in Tibetan, Cantonese, and Mandarin
I can't comment on Tibetan, but the Cantonese expression literally means "many thanks" (多謝, IPA: /tɔː˥ t͡sɛː˨/) while the Mandarin expression is "thanks-thanks" (謝謝, IPA: /ɕi̯ɛ˥˩ ɕi̯ɛ˥˩/). The second syllable of the Cantonese expression is cognate to the duplicated syllables of the Mandarin expression.
Jun
2
comment 乐 Le and Yue: When did they diverge?
Overall a good answer, but a few corrections that would affect your timeline of events slightly: 唐韵 was written in 732 AD, not BC. Also, most Sino-Japanese vocabulary was borrowed was borrowed between the 5th and 9th centuries, not between 3rd and 5th. According to The Languages of Japan (Shibatani 1990): "a systematic introduction of the Chinese language occurred around A.D. 400, when Korean scholars brought Chinese books to Japan."
May
3
comment The pronunciation of 的
It's in my opinion that the currently second highest voted answer (written by Betty) of the linked duplicate question is the actual correct answer.
Apr
12
comment Differentiating Between Dove And Pigeon In Chinese
It's relevant because it basically says that even in English the two terms are not reliably distinguished, so it's unlikely that you'd find the same distinction in another language.
Apr
12
comment What is the meaning of “拜了个拜”?
This is a good answer. It's not unknown to see a two-character verb that was not originally derived from a verb+object compound be treated as if it were. Another example I can think of is 小了个便. This kind of usage can connote a bit of playfulness in the tone of the sentence.
Apr
3
comment Subway door announcement mystery
@TangNawen 請勿 can be seen in Mandarin too, but its usage would be considered formal or literary as well. 請不要 is much more readily understandable when spoken. The reason why 請勿 is used in Cantonese (rather than the more usually spoken 唔好 m4 hou2 or even more colloquial 咪 mai5) is probably sociolinguistic; pronouncements in Cantonese generally follow written rather than spoken conventions. The written standard used to be Classical/Literary Chinese before it switched to Mandarin-based in the 20th century, but there is still the tendency to retain more Classical phrasing when given the choice.
Apr
3
comment Subway door announcement mystery
@TangNawen Welcome to the site! If you like the answer, don't forget to mark it as your accepted answer it by clicking on the checkmark on the left of the answer.
Feb
5
comment “that” in Mandarin joining clauses or sentences?
@PdotWang That's merely a convention in punctuation. Note that when spoken, the words are exactly the same. If you Google for the exact phrase "他們說他們會來", you'll see that more often than not, this convention is not followed.
Dec
3
comment Which radicals are used mostly just as phonetic?
FYI, when 阝 appears on the right side, it is actually the shorthand form of 邑, not 阜. See: baike.baidu.com/view/457766.htm