126 reputation
2
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen Apr 14 at 0:31

Apr
11
awarded  Student
Apr
11
asked Where can I find isogloss maps for Mandarin?
Feb
23
comment Are there words in Mandarin written by characters for other words that mean the same thing?
"even if the word is not cognate or in any way related to the etymology of 给". Really? How common is that phenomenon? Do you have examples? I don't think the ideographic use of characters you're asking about is very common in Mandarin, although it's common in e.g. Japanese, where characters are used for both Sinitic and Japonic words.
Feb
19
comment Is 了 optional when a time word is present?
So is e.g. 住了 (aspectual 了) not possible at all, or just not necessary when there's a time phrase?
Feb
6
comment Are “身份证” and “身分证” totally interchangeable?
It's 身分証 in Japanese, so don't know if Japanese rule in Taiwan could have influenced the Taiwanese way of writing it. 份 is not in common use in Japan.
Feb
25
comment How can I pronounce 绿 (lü4 - green)?
Just in case you weren't aware: The vowel phonemes in "book" (ʊ) and "fool" (u) are different, and in English many pronounce ʊ without much rounding.
Feb
21
comment Why do Chinese translations of English names sound very inaccurate?
Do you have an example of a translation coming from Japanese?
Feb
8
comment Is there a lot of value in learning to write Chinese characters?
I think you're confusing memorization (learning how to reproduce something) and recognition. The question is not whether writing will help you memorize. It seems pretty obvious that it will. It's not even whether writing (compared to doing nothing) will help you recognize. It seems pretty obvious that it will too. The question is: Given that your main goal is NOT writing (by hand), is your time better spent writing or doing something else?
Feb
8
comment Is there a lot of value in learning to write Chinese characters?
@XièJìléi, you might think that everybody goes through the cognitive process text->sound->meaning when reading English, but that is far from the whole truth. The brains of people who read often will learn to shortcut the process, skipping the sound step, thereby making the reader able to read by skimming. Whether the fact that English orthography is more phonetic than Chinese orthography makes this process rarer or less efficient, I don't know. I just wanted to highlight that the process you describe takes place in English as well.
Feb
7
comment What is that use of 得?
How about 获得 and 取得? I believe these are also not descriptive-complement examples.
Feb
7
comment What is that use of 得?
Is this not an example of a verb-verb compound? In Chinese verb-object compounds occur in this order, so I don't think it can be parsed with a noun reading of 记.
Feb
7
awarded  Supporter