2,900 reputation
11035
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location Hong Kong
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 9 mins ago

Dec
8
comment Macau Cantonese, any differences from HK?
Good question. I don't notice the difference before. But I'm afraid this question may be too broad, if there's an answer :)
Dec
8
comment Why 纹 is the wrong character to write for tattoo?
Basically wrong. 1) 文身 is the very original form, not 紋身. 中華民國教育部重編國語辭典修訂本 include both entries 文身 and 紋身. In fact, the oracle script 文 just stands for tattoo. 2) Simplified Chinese characters weren't invented due to the cultural revolution. In PRC, the first official document for character simplification was issued in 1956, just before the cultural revolution. Well, if we are talking about the first time in modern China when simplified characters were officially carried out, it should be in 1935, via Order No. 11400 issued by MOE of ROC.
Dec
8
comment Why 纹 is the wrong character to write for tattoo?
I don't know why you call them "communists", but indeed they are so-called purists. The very original meaning of 文 traced back to oracle scripts was just "tattoo on the chest", while 紋 didn't appear in Shuowen and was invented to differentiate from 文 much later. The purists are so proud that they refuse to use the character without historical origin. It seems ridiculous but sometimes they have a point in my opinion (e.g. I agree that the character 錶 is totally needless).
Dec
5
comment Chinese Year on a Postmark
九 means time, 9 AM. Here is a comprehensive source‌​.
Dec
3
comment Why is Zhenya Wang's surname in English “Wang” but sometimes pronounced “Wong”?
"Wang" is written in the Pinyin system for transcribing the Mandarin pronunciations in PRC, Taiwan and Singapore. "Wong" is the Cantonese pronunciation, so in Hong Kong, the surname 王 is just written as "Wong" (but in Guangdong province in PRC, the area where Cantonese is spoken, most people don't follow this). I guess maybe in Australia there are many Chinese people calling him in Cantonese, so some English speakers follow the Cantonese pronunciation.
Dec
3
comment Number two in chinese: 二 vs 两
This page concludes the evolution of the Chinese unit of measurement for mass. So how much weight 斤/两 measures actually depends on which standard you follow.
Dec
3
comment Which radicals are used mostly just as phonetic?
I believe these two pages, Radical and Phono-semantic compound characters, can offer you an overview of those concepts.
Dec
3
reviewed Looks OK Semantic Puns and Alternative Hanzi
Dec
3
reviewed Looks OK What does 牛逼 mean? Can anyone define it?
Dec
2
comment What is the difference between 台 and 臺?
This doesn't provide an answer to the question. It's better to read the question carefully before answering it.
Nov
28
reviewed Close What is a very comprehensive syntax structure?
Nov
24
comment What is the chinese translation for “ endure and move on ”?
If it's the whole thing you want to translate -- 1. it's grammatical, but sounds non-native; 2. yes, you need 和 in the middle. But there's some subtle difference between the English and Chinese phrases, if I didn't get it wrong, "endure and move on" means "bear the pain and continue the life"; but 想开 means "let go", once you 想开, you don't have to bear any pain, you just get over the pain, so it means you don't have to 忍 any more. "忍和想开" doesn't quite make sense to me.
Nov
20
comment Difference between 惊讶 and 吃惊?
You have a good example, "吃了惊". When 吃惊 and 惊讶 are used as "single phrases", they are the same, so 令人吃惊 and 令人惊讶 are both valid and have the same meaning (at least I can't figure out the difference immediately). However, 惊讶 is constructed by two characters with the same property, 惊+讶 is noun + noun; while, 吃+惊 is verb + noun. As a result, you can 吃了一惊, but you can't 惊了一讶. Hmm, though I'm a native speaker, my grammar level is limited (high school I guess), so let's wait for real experts to explain this~
Nov
17
comment Why is 那儿 just one syllable?
Type naer via IME. Pronounce it as 儿化音.
Nov
17
comment When to use `他的太太` and when `他太太`?
@WangDingwei well, that sounds like a meta-grammatical topic on "which kind of grammar rules is more proper". Your opinion is the role of grammatical structure should be affected by the phrase's meaning besides its part-of-speech property. But at least some grammarians don't like that, so we can see the example on Wikipedia I mentioned. I think there's no flaw in considering 我車壞了 an equivalent omitted form of 我的車壞了. I admit this kind of convenience on grammar would cause discomfort on language intuition.
Nov
17
comment When to use `他的太太` and when `他太太`?
@WangDingwei I'm not an expert on Chinese grammar, but I think both the interpretations, 我||车坏了 and 我车||坏了, are normal. The entry of 主谓短语 on Wikipedia offers an example: 他||身體很強壯, 他身體||很強壯.
Nov
16
comment Is Mandarin impossible for my goals?
@ColinMcLarty In my opinion, it's acceptable if the specific products are helpful to the OP. As moderators are human, they of course have an eye for advertisements.
Nov
16
reviewed No Action Needed Is Mandarin impossible for my goals?
Nov
16
reviewed No Action Needed Is Mandarin impossible for my goals?
Nov
16
comment Self-Teaching and Methods of Practice
Comprehensive answer +1. But I think unable to write beautiful strokes or characters is not a big deal. Many Chinese people can't do that either.