2,881 reputation
11035
bio website
location Hong Kong
age
visits member for 1 year, 5 months
seen 14 hours ago

Sep
2
reviewed No Action Needed How to express: Get
Sep
2
reviewed Close Could someone translate text carved on my flute?
Sep
2
comment Confusion about the ice radical 冫
@Sektor thanks :)
Sep
2
comment Confusion about the ice radical 冫
从仌从夂 means "仌 and 夂 are semantic components". The radical is "a graphical component of a Chinese character under which the character is traditionally listed in a Chinese dictionary". The semantic component and the radical are not always the same. Although 說文 has both radical 夂 and radical 仌, 冬 is only listed under 仌.
Sep
2
revised Confusion about the ice radical 冫
added 1319 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Confusion about the ice radical 冫
added 1596 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Confusion about the ice radical 冫
added 2206 characters in body
Sep
2
answered Confusion about the ice radical 冫
Sep
1
comment Can 良好 be used as a closing remark?
No, 良好 sounds weird as a closing phrase in Chinese emails or letters. We would simply say 保重/祝好 for informal ones, and 此致敬礼/敬祝安好/即问近安 etc. for different formal cases.
Sep
1
comment 够 or 夠 - Two characters, one meaning?
These two characters were variants in the old times and completely interchangeable. However, currently mainland China picks 够 as the standard one while Taiwan picks 夠.
Sep
1
comment Is it 一些东西 or 一点东西?
一些东西 refers to "some stuff" in a general sense. However 一点东西 is subtly different: because 一点 can mean either "some in a general sense" or "(only a) few", when you say 一点东西, the listener would probably feel you suggest "things are few". Thus I don't hear "一点东西" often. "这是我的一点心意" is a good example which shows the nuance. To be humble, native speakers prefer "一点心意" to "一些心意" here.
Aug
31
comment 零 in context of age, other uses?
@HenryHO I guess he meant "歲" XD
Aug
29
comment How to exclude an ingredient when ordering food?
@HenryHO I'm serious :P If there's any material evidence of your theory, no doubt I will believe it. If not, both of the theories are equal "hypotheses".
Aug
28
comment How to exclude an ingredient when ordering food?
@HenryHO Sorry I can't remember the name of the program. I heard it too long ago. The reason for my remembering such a theory was it's really unheard-of. However, maybe "飛砂走奶" is not a perfect point in the sense of attacking that theory. Because the theory could explain it as "(wi)thout=>走" existed first and then evolved to "飛...走..." -- still self-consistent -- unless there's any material which can prove the very original version had nothing to do with "without".
Aug
27
comment How to exclude an ingredient when ordering food?
@HenryHO I heard this explanation from an educational program of a Hong Kong local radio station. I hadn't done any textual research on this issue, but I thought it made sense. Do you have any material for your explanation? Thank you!
Aug
27
comment How to exclude an ingredient when ordering food?
This usage of 走 comes from English. It's short for "without"; "thout" sounds like 走 in Cantonese.
Aug
26
comment simplification of 唻?
Many "類推簡化" (Analogy simplification) characters haven't been included in Unicode. And some of them will be selected as extensions in the following "CJK extension area".
Aug
19
comment 演 = 氵+ 寅 but what's it got to do with water!? How did it get its modern meanings?
First, the source you cited plagiarized 象形字典. Second, 象形字典 itself is a very controversial source. All conclusions in that dictionary come from an amateur without citing any other previous work which is divergent from his own opinion. For oracles, though a little out of date, 甲骨文字典 is a much better reference.
Aug
18
comment Can someone explain what the 其 in 順其自然 means?
順其自然 => 順 its 自然.
Aug
16
comment I found a random file on my desktop, and I need to know what it says in English
Wrong encoding. Even Chinese can't read it.