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bio website endlesstweet.blogspot.hk
location Hong Kong
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visits member for 1 year, 2 months
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I'm Chinese. I am learning English, so I am maintaining a blog written in English. Welcome to my blog and leave your comments! Thanks :p


May
21
comment How do we translate the Chinese slang “抠脚大汉” into English?
Hmm, not that issue. Yes they're creeps but, the term 抠脚大汉 emphasizes something special ... It reminds me the trolling face in rage comics ... and at the same time, the term suggests their pretending to be girls on the Internet to make fun (this point is important).
May
21
comment How do we translate the Chinese slang “抠脚大汉” into English?
So, what would you call a dirty man "who pretends to be a young beautiful lady on (and only on) the Internet and stealthily makes fun of netizens" in English?
May
21
comment How do we translate the Chinese slang “抠脚大汉” into English?
According to Urban dictionary's definition for Internet creep: "One who is incapable of chatting up girls in real life and therefore resorts to stalking them online." Thus, wrong, that's not 抠脚大汉.
May
21
comment Explanation of why 棋 is included in 琴棋书画?
+1 for the sources. But the argument at the end is weak: "以閨秀自命者,書、畫、琴、棋四藝,均不可少", here "knowing four arts" is only the necessary condition for 閨秀, but it never suggests "the four arts of ladies".
May
21
comment The Chinese of “Browse Teachers” : 访问老师?
No. But the literal translation "浏览老师" sounds a little stiff and strange to me either. Maybe just "Teachers' Profiles", 教师简况 or something like that would be more natural to Chinese speakers.
May
20
comment How to say “craving for something”? (Food Related)
"mouth itches"? 嘴痒. However, formally it means "craving for saying something". (Anyway, I won't feel strange when anyone uses 嘴痒 to "crave for a certain food".)
May
20
comment Explanation of why 棋 is included in 琴棋书画?
Go would be "sophisticated" enough. Deep Blue defeated Kasparov many year ago, while even with much interest of programmers and mathematicians, as far as I know, a Go program hasn't been able to defeat an unknown professional Go player (I mean any player who gets dan grading from Chinese/Korean/Japanese Go Association) yet.
May
19
comment Pattern in the Chinese numbers 1 to 9
For the "origin", I've wrote this post before. But maybe that's not what you want.
May
16
comment “an” final pronunciation
@j5shi I suggest you listen to the British English "an". As many Chinese students learn American English, probably you presuppose the only weak sound /ən/ image in your mind, but that's not very true to every case.
May
16
comment “an” final pronunciation
"The an in Chinese sounds like the an in fantastic" You should declare it's in British English.
May
16
comment “an” final pronunciation
@Ming That 汉典 site is kind of similar to Wikipedia, many amateurs and experts maintain it. I'm not sure if it's "authoritative enough". Anyway, I think user58955's comments are more relevant to your point (actually I've no idea about such "minor" distinction in English pronunciation), I'd like to see his comments become the answer :D
May
15
comment “an” final pronunciation
Hmm, indeed, your Macmillan Dictionary audio sample for ban link sounds very close to the standard Mandarin bàn. I haven't noticed British-style pronunciation before. For Chinese online dictionaries, I suggest 汉典. It's quite comprehensive, and of course, provides audio samples for characters. Maybe you would have a try?
May
15
comment What is the original Chinese text to “liquid jade”?
Quite possible it is "玉液". However I haven't found the original source yet. And according to this book, "the froth of the liquid jade" wasn't said by Laozi but another person.
May
15
comment How do you pronounce 盛开?
"shèng kāi", of cource. Generally, different pronunciation of a character has a different meaning.
May
15
comment “an” final pronunciation
新闻联播 is a credible source for learning pronunciation. Try this video on Youtube (14:51-14:53): "三天内 结所需手续". What does you hear? /ban/, /bən/, /bæn/, or /bʌn/? To me, the pinyin bàn sounds like /ban/.
May
15
comment “an” final pronunciation
they agree that "an" should be pronounced like the English "an" (e.g. an apple) I've never heard a native Chinese speaker pronounces pinyin an as "an in an apple". I doubt they meant the phonetic symbol /an/ where /a/ is a short "ah" sound -- if so, that makes sense.
May
11
reviewed Leave Open What does “yellow face wife” (黄脸婆) mean?
May
11
reviewed Close Language exchange
May
8
comment How do current Mandarin speakers usually pronounce 阿Q正传?
(As no one mentions here) I would say some people would pronounce it as "阿丘正传", and it's actually, the way following the alphabet name definition in 汉语拼音方案. Anyway, I myself would pronounce it as the name of the Latin letter with the first tone in Mandarin (and I would think the more normal "fourth tone" Latin style is also OK).
May
8
comment How do current Mandarin speakers usually pronounce 阿Q正传?
It reminds me the pronunciation of 恪 in the name 陈寅恪. There're always controversies how this kind of special name should be pronounced. IMO, as there's actually no standard (or I miss it?), it doesn't matter for us to freely choose an acceptable one.