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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Jul 21 at 0:21

Jan
31
comment Is there a rule that tells what characters can be omitted?
I think it is strange to talk of omitting 'characters'. What you are talking about is omitting words. Even in Chinese I think it would sound strange to talk about omitting 'characters' in speech.
Jan
23
awarded  Supporter
Jan
23
awarded  Critic
Jan
23
comment What's the difference between 星期X and 周X?
"Libai" is common in many parts of China. The curiousest thing I've noticed is that speakers of dialects where 礼拜 is common (such as Cantonese) tend to use 星期 when using Mandarin, presumably because 星期 is taught as the 'better' form.
Jan
23
comment What's the difference between 星期X and 周X?
OK, what about 周日 then?
Jan
20
comment Correct word to use for a suburban fence?
What is the normal word for the dividers that separate road traffic from the bicycle lane? I would have called them 栏杆.
Jan
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
18
comment What is the correct way to write 'niu bi', and how did it get its meaning in Chinese?
In front of a girl it's fine to just say 牛!
Jan
15
answered Different pronounciation for the number 'one'?
Jan
15
comment Using 的 at the end of a sentence
I don't have much to add to Huang's great answer. One thing is that 会 is quite normally associated with final 的. Second is that in writing (especially serious prose, not conversation), I think 的 is more likely to be omitted.
Jan
14
revised Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
deleted 73 characters in body
Jan
14
revised Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
deleted 73 characters in body
Jan
14
revised Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
Added section from Pulleybank's Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar
Jan
14
comment Position of 面熟 in this sentence
In fact, I find this sentence quite interesting because it embodies one aspect of Chinese that I've noticed but find hard to pin down, i.e., sentences that contain what might be called 'hybrid structures'. They make perfect sense but it's not clear how to analyse them cleanly. In this case, it's the overlapping of a simple concatenation of sentences (e.g., 常常看着一个人,他认识你,你不认识他) and the topic-comment structure (人面熟却叫不出名字来). Please don't ask me for other examples because I can't give you any, but this kind of phenomenon seems somehow very familiar in Chinese.
Jan
13
comment Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
Claw, you give very good answers based in linguistics. One problem here is defining our terms. The OP is working from an a priori assumption that the distinction between verbs and adjectives is a given, presumably because it's found in Latin and Western grammar in general. Linguists, on the other hand, might try to argue that there is no fundamental distinction between adjectives and verbs in Chinese. I don't know which (if either) is correct, but the different starting points seem to be confusing the discussion somewhat.
Jan
13
comment Position of 面熟 in this sentence
I'm in two minds about the topic-comment analysis. The Wikipedia article gives only nominal topics, which can be seen as a result of 'topicalisation'. This seems rather different. Can the concept of topic be extended to an entire sentence (常常看着一个人)? (In English, this kind of meaning could be expressed colloquially as: 'You often see someone where you can remember the face but not the name'.) While the Chinese could be written 常常看着一个人,面熟却叫不出名字来, this obscures the fact that 人面熟 does form a natural unit in Chinese, precisely in the topic-comment construction that you mention.
Jan
13
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
Jon, my hat off to you for finding a good article on the topic. There is, of course, a logic in linguistic structures; the problem comes when you ask 'why is xx language structured that way and not the same as our language?'. To fully answer Alennano's question, we still need to explain why 有 had the negative form 无 (無) in the Classical language. That is where the problem (special form of negation for one particular verb) seems to have started. And I still don't believe there is any other answer than 'that's how Classical Chinese was structured'.
Jan
13
answered Stative verbs in Chinese: only for adjectives?
Jan
12
comment When should you use 尽管 (jǐnguǎn) instead of 虽然 (suīrán)?
On a Mac, tones can be input using U.S. Extended keyboard (which should be made default English input method). Before typing the vowel over which the tone mark appears, type alt a for 1st tone (¯), alt e for second tone (´), alt v for third tone (ˇ), alt ` for fourth tone (`). It's not too cumbersome when you get used to it. Even works for ǚ (type alt v + v).
Jan
12
comment Is the difference between and saying 有时 and 会偶尔 very big?
My apologies. You should listen to Terry LiYifeng.