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Chinese student/enthusiast since 2005. I welcome ALL comments and corrections on my Chinese -- I'm always looking for new ways to learn!


Jan
11
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
...grammatical claim which comes from linguists who have studied how the language works. A good answer to this question would probably involve knowledge of classical Chinese, the spread of standard vernacular Chinese, and the status of words like 沒 in major dialects. I suppose it was refreshing to hear someone say, "I don't know!" rather than trot out a few example sentences involving 沒 and some vaguely remembered facts about 沒 having something to do with tense.
Jan
11
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
@Bathrobe: You're right. The claim is spurious, and I shouldn't have let it fly so easily. I disagree that this is worse than baseless speculation, though. I think this is closer to a good answer to this question than many of the other answers, and so I've kept my upvote in place. (I've also upvoted tbaums's answer, which I missed at first. It's a better answer than this one, but in the same vein.) Also, your comment highlights what I think is the problem with this thread: saying that "can" is a modal auxiliary is a WAY better answer than most of the stuff here because it's a specific...
Jan
11
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
+1: I'm not sure I understand or buy the claim that Asian languages are less logical, but this is the only answer which attempts to address the actual question without engaging in baseless speculation.
Jan
10
awarded  Student
Jan
10
comment What does 糗大 (qiǔdà) mean?
@Alenanno: I put the reading of 糗 in both the title and the question itself, so that's a non issue. It's fine if you don't know the characters "才" and "真", but according to this list they are among the 300 most common characters in Chinese. I don't mean any disrespect, but glossing these characters would only be necessary for total beginners who would probably get more benefit from looking them up in the dictionary anyway.
Jan
10
awarded  Commentator
Jan
10
comment What does 糗大 (qiǔdà) mean?
@Alenanno: the pinyin is correct, but I don't believe it's necessary here. See my post in meta for my views on the subject.
Jan
10
answered What does 糗大 (qiǔdà) mean?
Jan
10
asked What does 糗大 (qiǔdà) mean?
Jan
10
comment What is the meaning of 相声?
To forestall any potential confusion: I have heard many Chinese people refer to 相声 as 脱口秀 ("talk show"), but 相声 certainly doesn't match the vision most English speakers have of what talk show means. I'd consider 脱口秀 and talk show to be "false friends" in this case.
Jan
10
comment 血: xuè , xiě, what's the difference?
@Alenanno: "Thanks in advance"
Jan
10
revised “Actually” as a sentence-starter of speech filler
fixed pinyin
Jan
10
comment 血: xuè , xiě, what's the difference?
@msittig: you're welcome! I'm looking forward to hearing from some native speakers about their own impressions of the distinction.
Jan
10
revised 血: xuè , xiě, what's the difference?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
10
suggested suggested edit on “Actually” as a sentence-starter of speech filler
Jan
10
answered 血: xuè , xiě, what's the difference?
Jan
10
revised Difference between 对 and 双
added 2 characters in body
Jan
10
answered Difference between 对 and 双
Jan
10
comment What are the different kinds of poems in Chinese?
A good question, but remember that defining a poem in English isn't easy. For any criterion you propose (rhyme, meter, line patterns, etc.), there's a poem that fails to match it. It's no wonder that Chinese's long poetic history can't be easily summarized either!
Jan
10
awarded  Editor