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seen Oct 9 '13 at 1:49

Oct
9
awarded  Supporter
Jan
20
answered Why is it written LIU in Pinyin, when there's clearly an O sound?
Jan
11
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
I agree. Such an attempt would be questionable. That's why I did not make any such attempt.
Jan
11
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
My claims aren't "spurious" - everything I wrote is true and based on personal experience with the languages themselves. You may not like hearing it, sure, but that doesn't make it less true. Also, the example of the emperor's names is included only to illustrate the heavy political influence on the Chinese language that often overrides grammatical common sense, making the explanation for that characteristic a creature of historical context, that may easily be lost to time, instead of a rule-based linguistic one. It has nothing to do with the character in question, nor was it meant to.
Jan
11
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
Not "less logical" as much as less "logically-oriented." As in, logic tends to be less of a consideration when dealing with Asian languages. Things are often the way they are "just because" and the actual causes or underlying forces are unknowable except to scholars of history. See: Japanese.
Jan
11
awarded  Teacher
Jan
11
answered Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?