1,232 reputation
312
bio website overpunch.com
location Sydney, Australia
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 2 days ago

I am a computational linguistics PhD candidate. But before that, long before that, I fell in love with languages.

By the way, if you're addicted to Stack Exchange and use iOS, check out Stackwise for iOS and browse Stack Exchange beautifully.


Mar
5
answered Cantonese jyutping Tone 4 question “throat should be vibrating”
Feb
14
asked 'Simplification' of 夠
Jan
30
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
accepted Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
Jan
23
comment Resources for learning Cantonese
(I just noticed, the jyutping should of course be bin3jam1...)
Jan
22
comment Resources for learning Cantonese
@StumpyJoePete: The best resource I've found on pin3jam1, as the phenomenon is sometimes called, is in Bauer & Benedict (1997) "Modern Cantonese Phonology". To answer your question, it's not regularly triggered by anything. The comparison to erhua is appropriate; like it, pin3jam1 has among its functions a non-productive noun->verb derivational affix, a verb->noun derivational affix and a marker of familiarity.
Jan
22
comment Resources for learning Cantonese
It's not often pointed out that the phonology of Hong Kong Cantonese is actually less alien to most English speakers than Standard Mandarin. The only sounds which aren't present for many speakers of English are the vowels [y] and [œ], and marginally also syllable-initial [ŋ] (which young HK speakers drop anyway). Standard Mandarin has the retroflex and palatal series, as well as [ɤ], which pose problems for a lot of learners. There are indeed 6 tones in Hong Kong Cantonese, but on the other hand there isn't tone sandhi like there is in Mandarin.
Dec
9
comment Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
Thanks for a well-researched answer. I suspected there would be literature about this. Do any of the references suggest when the change took place? As I said above, the fact that Korean borrowings preserve final -m and -p in these cases allows the date of the sound change to be bounded on one side.
Dec
7
comment Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
I only know that it would have happened before the main borrowing of Chinese readings into Korean, since those preserve the original finals. As for your second question, let's use Cantonese: 品 became ban2 and 凡 became faan4: bilabial finals became alveolar finals.
Dec
7
comment Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
That's obvious. We're talking about Middle Chinese here. However, Cantonese has bilabial finals, yet 法 is faat3 because of this dissimilation instead of faap3.
Dec
7
revised Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
deleted 8 characters in body; edited title
Dec
7
comment Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
Oops, true. It's just place of articulation then.
Dec
7
asked Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
Nov
15
comment What is etymology for 沙龙?
ステーション is more usual. Not sure, but japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/901/… may be relevant.
Nov
1
comment Etymology of 其他
It's more likely that 其の他 arose as a calque of 其他.
Nov
1
comment Are there more special numerals like 廿?
How is 廿 pronounced in Shanghainese?
Oct
29
answered Are there more special numerals like 廿?
Oct
8
comment Why do Chinese translations of English names sound very inaccurate?
Neither statement is correct. The Japanese <r> is a flap, and the only comparable thing in an English dialect is the alveolar tap in rapid speech for some speakers in butter.
Sep
6
comment What is the Mandarin equivalent for the Shanghai term for dirty?
Interesting. I wonder if it's cognate to Cantonese 污糟 wu1 zou1. The tones would suggest not, though.
Sep
2
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
To my chagrin this whole thread is rife with mischaracterisations about the relationship between Cantonese and Mandarin. On the subject of Cantonese syntax absent from Mandarin, I'll list a few examples: reduced frequency of the 把 (ba) and 被 (bei) constructions, bare classifier+noun with definite reading, dative shift (as found in English), a richer system of modal particles.