1,242 reputation
312
bio website overpunch.com
location Sydney, Australia
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 2 days ago

I am a computational linguistics PhD candidate. But before that, long before that, I fell in love with languages.

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Sep
2
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
This answer is imprecise in a number of ways. The usual reflex of 不 in Cantonese is 唔 (Jyutping m4), and 不 bat1 when rendering Mandarin text or in set phrases. Secondly, Mandarin syllables can end in the null coda, or /n/, or /ŋ/, while Cantonese syllables can also end in /p/, /t/, /k/ or /m/. Third, the resemblance between Cantonese and Korean is superficial, only explained by the fact that Korean borrowed readings from Chinese when it still preserved those codas.
Aug
29
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
@Krazer: Thanks for your reply. It's true that Cantonese stops are unreleased in final position, and it's true that a syllable with a null onset (regardless of whether the previous syllable ends in a stop) begins with a glottal stop. However, it's still not correct that "since they are unreleased, they are considered glottal stops". It's true that some Min (and Wu) languages have phonemic glottal stops in final position, but Cantonese does not. That said, I'm only familiar with Standard Cantonese.
Aug
28
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
No, no. I realise that 7, 8, 9 correspond to entering tones, but unreleased stop and glottal stop are not one and the same. A glottal stop involves a constriction in the glottis. An unreleased stop is one without a release of air following the constriction. Do consult any phonetics textbook, or you can ask a native speaker who knows some phonetics.
Aug
28
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
Glottal stops cannot end a Cantonese syllable.
Aug
28
comment Ordering food from a menu in a restaurant
I don't know if it's a Northern/Southern Mandarin thing, but I've only heard this up north. I don't think this (or its Cantonese reflex lai4/lei4) is used in Cantonese for this purpose.
Aug
27
comment Ordering food from a menu in a restaurant
You could also use 来, as in 来一份牛排套餐.
Aug
20
accepted 佰 vs 百: inconsistency in use
Aug
20
asked Visual puns and phrases
Aug
19
accepted Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese
Aug
13
revised Is there any website of where I can look up the origins of a Chinese character?
added 161 characters in body
Aug
13
answered Is there any website of where I can look up the origins of a Chinese character?
Aug
11
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
2
revised How is the Kanji character 豚 related to the chinese 猪 / 豬
added 421 characters in body
Aug
1
revised How is the Kanji character 豚 related to the chinese 猪 / 豬
added 58 characters in body
Aug
1
comment How is the Kanji character 豚 related to the chinese 猪 / 豬
The part where you ask for the Mandarin reading is really best served by self-research. However, the second half of your question -- why Japanese uses different characters for certain Chinese concepts -- is a good one.
Aug
1
answered How is the Kanji character 豚 related to the chinese 猪 / 豬
Jul
27
comment Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese
Thanks for a well-researched answer.
Jul
27
revised Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese
added 16 characters in body
Jul
27
asked Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese